Surname: Franks

Carter Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

I find it disappointing in the wonderful manuscript of R. A. F. Candage that he failed to provide any substance on the progenitor of the Carter family in Blue Hill, James Carter, Sr. What we can gather, is James arrived in Blue Hill about 1770 from Edgecomb Maine with his young family and settled at the location known later as the Carter Places. He had at least the following children: James and David. The offspring of both James and David are much more thoroughly on this page.

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Slave Narrative of Pet Franks

Interviewer: Mrs. Richard Kolb Person Interviewed: Pet Franks Location: Aberdeen, Mississippi Age: 92 Uncle Pet, 92 year old ex-slave, is the favorite of Ackers’ Fishing Lodge which is situated 14 miles north of Aberdeen, Monroe County. He is low and stockily built. His ancestry is pure African. Scarcely topping five feet one inch, he weighs about 150 pounds. Though he walks with the slightest limp, he is still very active and thinks nothing of cooking for the large groups who frequent the lodge. He has his own little garden and chickens which he tends with great care. “I knows all ’bout slav’ry an’ de war. I was right dere on de spot when it all happened. I wish to goodness I was back dere now, not in de war, but in de slav’ry times. Niggers where I lived didn’ have nothin’ to worry ’bout in dem days. Dey aint got no sense now-a-days. All dey b’lieves in now is drinkin’ an’ carousin’. Dey aint got no use for nothin’ but a little corn likker an’ a fight. I dont b’lieve in no such gwine-on, no sir-ree. Dat’s de reason I stays out here by myse’f all de time. I don’t want to have nothin’ to do wid ’em. I goes to town ’bout once a mont’ to git s’pplies, but I don’ never fool ‘roun’ wid dem Niggers den....

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Slave Narrative of Dora Franks

Interviewer: Mrs. Richard Kolb Person Interviewed: Dora Franks Location: Aberdeen, Mississippi Place of Residence: Aberdeen, Monroe County, Mississippi Age: 100 (?) Dora Franks, ex-slave, lives at Aberdeen, Monroe County. She is about five feet tall and weighs 100 pounds. Her hair is inclined to be curly rather than kinky. She is very active and does most of her own work. “I was born in Choctaw County, but I never knowed zackly how old I was, ’cause none o’ my folks could read an’ write. I reckon I be’s ’bout a hund’ed, ’cause I was a big girl long time fo’ Surrender. I was old ‘nough to marry two years after dat. “My mammy come from Virginny. Her name was Harriet Brewer. My daddy was my young Marster. His name was Marster George Brewer an’ my mammy always tol’ me dat I was his’n. I knew dat dere was some dif’ence ‘tween me an’ de res’ o’ her chillun, ’cause dey was all coal black, an’ I was even lighter dan I is now. Lawd, it’s bean to my sorrow many a time, ’cause de chillun used to chase me ’round an’ holler at me, ‘Old yallow Nigger.’ Dey didn’ treat me good, neither. “I stayed in de house mos’ o’ de time wid Miss Emmaline. Miss Emmaline’s hair was dat white, den. I loved her’ cause she was so...

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Biography of John W. Franks

JOHN W. FRANKS, deceased. In every community some men are known for their upright lives, strong common sense and moral worth rather than for their wealth or political standing. Their neighbors respect them, the young generations heed their example, and when they go to the grave posterity listens with reverence to the story of their quiet and useful lives. Such a man was John W. Franks, who was born in Hardin County, Tennessee, July 13, 1837, and died on his farm near Timbo, in Stone County, Arkansas, November 20, 1886. His father, Jack Franks, died in Tennessee. John W. Franks received no educational advantages in his youth, and at the time of his marriage could hardly write his name, but at odd times thereafter he applied himself to his books and became reasonably well posted in the three R’s. From Tennessee he went to Mississippi; in 1859 came to Baxter County, Arkansas, and located near Big Flat, which was one of the roughest places in that part of the country, but the soil was rich and fertile, and there he determined to pitch his tent.” He was industrious, made good crops, and was ably assisted by his young wife who was as ambitious as he. They had a young yoke of oxen, a few household articles, and in this way commenced their married life. During the Civil War Mr....

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Biography of Richard M. Franks

Richard M. Franks. One of the representative citizens of Philo, Illinois, is Richard M. Franks, who not only is managing important business interests but is also one of the trustworthy public officials of township and village. Mr. Franks was born in Saxony, Germany, February 7, 1868, to which province his people have belonged for generations. His parents were Frederick and Julia (Wiedeman) Franks. They came from Germany to the United States in 1881 and located at Philo in Champaign County, Illinois. There the father died in 1897, the mother passing away at a later date in the city of Dubuque, Iowa. They were the parents of two sons, Richard M. and Otto, the latter of whom died in Germany. Richard M. Franks was thirteen years old when the family came to Champaign County and his schooldays were about ended. He went to work on a farm and continued to be interested in agricultural pursuits until 1904, in which year he came to Philo village and established a lumber yard here and later a yard also at Sidney, and since then has done a large business in this line. He is also agent for the Ford and Studebaker automobiles. Mr. Franks is a man of unusual business enterprise and in furthering his own business concerns has done well for others in affording employment to a number of men and paying...

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Biography of George B. Franks

George B. Franks. Considered as an art, landscape gardening is one that has a definite place in life, appealing to and satisfying that innate sense of the beautiful that all possess to some degree. Nature points the way and it is the precious gift of the landscape gardener to be able to reproduce, in limited space, her noble effects and most pleasing arrangement of tree, shrub and flower. The wonderful facility in this direction, as in other artistic talents, is largely an inherited gift, although to make it practical, of course, there must be much definite knowledge, mathematical and otherwise. Perhaps no university grounds in the country, and certainly none other in the State, have been as carefully and tastefully laid out as those of the University of Illinois and this admirable example of landscape gardening will long perpetuate the name of Franks, a name that has been identified here with flowers and gardening for almost a half century. The business, established in 1871 by the late Thomas Edward Franks, is prosperously continued by his son and partner, George B. Franks, the leading florist and very prominent citizen of Champaign. George B. Franks was born at Champaign, Illinois, November 2, 1879. His parents were Thomas Edward and Annie (English) Franks, the former of who was born in England and the latter in Ireland. Thomas Edward Franks was a nurseryman...

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Franks, W. T. – Obituary

W. T. Franks died at Lostine last Saturday, February 28th, from a relapse of the influenza. He had almost recovered from a severe attack but got out too quick. He had been in the blacksmith business until about a year ago when he sold out. He leaves a wife and five children to mourn his death. Wallowa County Reporter, Wallowa County, Oregon, Thursday March 4,...

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