Surname: Farmer

Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

Read More

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Read More

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Read More

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Read More

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC...

Read More

Captivity of Elizabeth Hanson – Indian Captivities

God’s Mercy Surmounting Man’s Cruelty, Exemplified in the Captivity and Surprising Deliverance of Elizabeth Hanson, Wife of John Hanson, of Knoxmarsh, at Kecheachy, in Dover Township, who was Taken Captive with her Children and Maid-Servant, by the Indians in New England, in the Year 1724. – The substance of which was taken from her own mouth, and now published for general service. The third edition. Philadelphia: reprinted; Danvers, near Salem: reprinted and sold by E. Russell, next the Bell Tavern, MDCCLXXX. At the same place may be had a number of new Books, &c., some of which are on the times. Cash paid for Rags. This edition of Mrs. Hanson’s narrative is copied from that printed at Dover, N. H., in 1821. These editions correspond, and I have discovered no disagreements in them. From a MS. extract, in the hand-writing of Mr. John Farmer, upon the cover of a copy of the Dover edition, it seems there was some doubt in his mind about the exact date of the capture of the Hanson family; for in that memorandum above mentioned, purporting to have been taken from the Boston News-Letter of 1722, it is stated to have happened on the 27th of August of that year. I have not been able to refer to the News-Letter, but I find the event noticed in Pemberton’s MS. Chronology as happening on the...

Read More

Slave Narrative of H. H. Edmunds

Interviewer: Albert Strope Person Interviewed: Rev. H. H. Edmunds Location: Elkhart, Indiana Place of Birth: Lynchburg, Virginia Date of Birth: 1859 Place of Residence: 403 West Hickory Street Elkhart, Indiana Albert Strope, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project St. Joseph County-District #1 Mishawaka, Indiana EX-SLAVE REV. H.H. EDMUNDS 403 West Hickory Street Elkhart, Indiana Rev. H.H. Edmunds has resided at 403 West Hickory Street in Elkhart for the past ten years. Born in Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1859, he lived there for several years. Later he was taken to Mississippi by his master, and finally to Nashville, Tennessee, where he lived until his removal to Elkhart. Mr. Edmunds is very religious, and for many years has served his people as a minister of the Gospel. He feels deeply that the religion of today has greatly changed from the “old time religion.” In slavery days, the colored people were so subjugated and uneducated that he claims they were especially susceptible to religion, and poured out their religious feelings in the so-called negro spirituals. Mr. Edmunds is convinced that the superstitions of the colored people and their belief in ghosts and gobblins is due to the fact that their emotions were worked upon by slave drivers to keep them in subjugation. Oftentimes white people dressed as ghosts, frightened the colored people into doing many things under protest. The “ghosts” were feared far more...

Read More

Slave Narrative of Lizzie Farmer

Person Interviewed: Lizzie Farmer Location: McAlester, Oklahoma Age: 80 “Cousin Lizzie!” “What.” “I’se seventy years old.” And I say, “Whut’s you telling me for.” I ain’t got nothing to do with your age!” I knowed I was one year older than she was and it sorta riled me for her to talk about it. I never would tell folks my age for I knowed white folks didn’t want no old woman working for ’em and I just wouldn’t tell ’em how old I really was. Dat was nine years ago and I guess I’m seventy five now. I can’t work much now. I was born four years before de war. “The one what set the cullud folks free.” We lived on a big plantation in Texas. Old Master’s name was John Booker and he was good to us all. My mammy died just at de close of de war and de young mistress took me and kept me and I growed up with her chillun I thought I was quality sure nuff and I never would go to school ’cause I couldn’t go ‘long to de same school with de white chillun. Young mistress taught me how to knit, spin, weave, crochet, sew and embroider. I couldn’t recollect my age and young Mistress told me to say, “I’se born de second year of de war dat set de cullud...

Read More

Biography of Jasper N. Farmer

JASPER N. FARMER. The peculiar responsibility which attaches to the compounding and dispensing of prescriptions and kindred functions, imparts to the calling of the druggist an interest and importance somewhat unique in this respect among the arts and sciences, and therefore it is that accuracy and vigilance become elements closely akin to knowledge and skill in the laboratory. In such connection we make due reference to Mr. Jasper N. Farmer, the prominent drug man at Sparta, whose neat and popular pharmacy com-mends itself to all. This prominent business man was born in Christian County, on the old home place, July 2, 1855 and is the son of Andrew J. and Nancy (Preston) Farmer, natives of Roane County, Tennessee Our subject attended the schools of Sparta and began his business career about 1878. The drug business has occupied his attention for the most part, but he was engaged in other occupations for the short time he resided in Springfield. In selecting his companion in life Mr. Farmer chose Miss Eliza Smith, a native of this county and a daughter of Eason Smith, of Ozark. Four children are the fruits of this union: Claude, Donnie B., Rose and Anna. In his political views Mr. Farmer is a Democrat and takes a deep interest in politics. He has made a complete success of his business and is the owner of considerable real...

Read More

Biography of Andrew J. Farmer

ANDREW J. FARMER (deceased). When a citizen of worth and character has departed from this life, it is meet that those who survive him should keep in mind his life work, and should hold up to the knowledge and emulation of the young his virtues and the characteristics which distinguished him and made him worthy the esteem of his neighbors. Therefore, the name of Andrew J. Farmer is presented to the readers of this volume as a public-spirited citizen and a man well and favorably known throughout the county. He was born in Roane County, Tennessee, in 1824, and at an early date came to Missouri, being the first of the family to settle in this county. This was about 1845 and he made his home here until his death in 1862. He was a son of Archibald Farmer, who was also a native of Tennessee, the family being an old and prominent one of that State. Our subject grew to mature years in his native State, received his education there, and was there married to Miss Nancy (Preston) Farmer, a native of the Big Bend State, born in Roane County in 1826. As above stated, Mr. and Mrs. Farmer came to Missouri in 1845, making the trip by wagon, and took up land near the present site of Sparta. Mr. Farmer was a prominent man of this county,...

Read More

Biography of Nathan K. Farmer

Nathan K. Farmer, who for twenty-nine years has occupied a beautiful home at Muskogee, has since 1883 resided in this section of the country, his attention being most successfully given to agricultural pursuits and stock raising. He was born in Callaway County, Missouri, July 22, 1848, and is a son of Jessie and Nancy (Reid) Farmer. The father, a native of Virginia, came to Missouri in his boyhood days and the mother was a native of the latter state, in which both were reared and married. They continued residents of Missouri until called to their final rest and were highly esteemed as citizens of the community in which they made their home. Nathan K. Farmer, their only child, was reared on the old homestead and pursued his education in the public schools of Missouri and in Westminster College. When his textbooks were put aside he turned to the occupation to which he had been reared, and throughout much of his life has been closely connected with farming and stock raising. In 1883 he disposed of his farm interests in Missouri and came to Oklahoma, then the Indian Territory, settling in the Creek agency. Here he engaged in merchandising, continuing in the business for about four years, or until 1887, when he again took up farming and stock raising, in which he has since been active. As the years have...

Read More

Biography of Edgar W. Farmer

EDGAR W. FARMER, a railway postal clerk on the New York Central Lines between Cleveland, Ohio, and St, Louis, Missouri, lives on Indiana Avenue, North Anderson, He was born here February 23, 1868. The Farmer family is better known, probably, than any other family in Anderson Township outside of the city of Anderson and ranks among the older ones in the County, Charles M. Farmer (April 16, 1846-June 27, 1910) and Mary L. Cummins Farmer (Nov. 27, 1848- Nov, 16, 1900), the parents of Edgar, moved from Henry County, Indiana, immediately after their marriage and bought two acres of land of Isaac Clifford. There were then about six houses in what is now known as North Anderson. Indiana Avenue was then a mud road lined by woods on both sides except an occasional clearing for a dwelling, A. little house was built on the land purchased, and here the children, Edgar W., Harold W., and Jessie M., and John S. were born, Charles, the father, had been left an orphan at the age of nine years and was the oldest of a family of four children, His first work was in a brick yard at twenty-five cents a day, From this on he toiled early and late, managed carefully and lived frugally, By this means he kept his mother in comfort, supported his brothers until their death in early...

Read More

Search

Subscribe to Website via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this website and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 3,631 other subscribers


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Recent Comments

Pin It on Pinterest