Surname: Eastman

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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An Historical Sketch of the Seneca County Medical Society

At the anniversary meeting of the Seneca County Medical Society held at Waterloo, July 23, 1885, a resolution was introduced by Dr. S. R. Welles, and adopted by the Society, that a committee be appointed which should prepare biographical sketches of members of the Society from its earliest history to the present time. As a result, this manuscript was published which includes 75 biographies of the early pioneers of the Seneca County Medical Society.

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Hutchinson Family of Norwich Vermont

Hutchinson is an old and numerous family in Norwich, as well as in other parts of the country. They were among the early settlers of Massachusetts and were in Lynn and Salem in that colony as early as 1628, or 1629. A descendant of these early colonists, named Abijah, who was a tailor, removed from Salem to Windham early in the eighteenth century. His son Samuel, born about 1719, in company with his son, John, came to Norwich in 1765. They cleared an island in the Connecticut River, opposite the present residency of John W. Loveland, and planted it with corn. In the fall of that year they returned to Connecticut, and in company with a younger son, Samuel, returned in the spring of 1766, and made a permanent settlement. The elder Samuel spent the remainder of his life in the town, and died February 8, 1809. His wife was Jemina Dunham; she died January 12, 1798. Besides the two sons named above, he had three daughters: Sarah, married Francis Smalley; Tabitha, married Jonathan Delano; Jerusha, married Nathan Roberts. They all died young,’ soon after marriage. Hutchinson, John, son of Samuel, was born in 1741, in Windham, Connecticut, and married Mary Wilson, who was born in Ashford, Connecticut, in August, 1744. He enlisted in the Continental Army, and died at Philadelphia, June 22, 1778. His widow afterwards married Solomon...

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that...

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Biography of Charles O. Eastman

Charles O. Eastman, formerly the Postmaster of Claremont, was born October 25, 1824, in Lisbon, N.H., one of the seven children of Nicholas and Hannah (Baker) Eastman. Until he reached the age of twenty-one years he remained with his parents, receiving his education in the district schools and the Methodist Seminary at Newbury, from which he duly graduated. After leaving the seminary, he taught school for several winters. In 1845 he left home to go to Windsor, Vt., where he remained for five years. Coming to Claremont in 1850, he was first employed in the bookbindery of the Claremont Manufacturing Company. While in their employ he was attacked by a serious illness, from which he never fully recovered during the ensuing thirty-five years of his life. This long period was one of patient suffering and of noble struggle with disease. He was a member of the Republican party. In 1861 President Lincoln appointed him Postmaster of Claremont. Having entered upon the duties of the office on June 17 of the same year, he continued to serve until July 11, 1870, a term of service distinguished by marked ability and faithfulness. He is spoken of as having been most accommodating and exceptionally fitted for the office. Beginning in 1872, he by careful Western New Hampshire. He was a director of no less than four insurance companies of the State, and...

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Biographical Sketch of Jonathan Eastman

Jonathan Eastman, who came to Bristol from Rupert, Vt., in 179l, was born in Norwich, Conn., in 1753. He removed to Rupert with his father, where he married a Miss Haynes, who bore him a daughter; and for his second wife a Miss Dean, who bore him five children. He was chosen as the town’s first justice of the peace, and first representative, in 1792, holding the former office seventeen years, and was again a representative in 1795; was town clerk eleven years and a selectman four years. He died December 6, 1816. Calvin, Oliver and Amos Eastman, brothers of Jonathan, were all respected residents of Bristol, the latter dying at a very advanced...

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Biographical Sketch of Capt. Cyprian Eastman

Captain Cyprian Eastman was born in Norwich, Conn., in 1749, and removed with his father to Beckett, and subsequently to Bennington county, where he married Rosannah Nehon, and soon after, in 1787, removed to this town, locating on the flats. He was chosen one of the first selectmen of the town, and at the organization of a militia company, in June, 1791, was chosen its captain, and was also one of the committee elected to lay out the first division lots and survey highways. He died of small-pox May 23,1798, aged forty-nine years, leaving a family of ten...

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Biography of Frederick Converse Eastman, M. D.

Frederick Converse Eastman was born in Lincoln county, Ontario Province, Canada, December 28, 1842. His parents, William and Catharine Eastman, were also natives of Canada. His father dying when he was live years old, he lived with his mother until he was fourteen, when he was employed in the store of G. C. Fields, of Smithville, Canada, as a clerk. Before leaving home his mother endeavored to give him a fair education. After clerking one year he attended the Academy at Gilsonburg, Canada, and was in attendance for four years. He began the study of medicine in 1861 under Dr. Michael Turner at Smithville, but Dr. Turner dying in the following fall he resumed his studies under Dr. J. Culver, of the same place. While pursuing his medical studies he taught school to defray his expenses. In 1864 he took a medical course in the medical department of the Michigan. State University at Ann Arbor, and in the spring of that year was appointed by Dr. J. C. Hughes, surgeon general of the State of Iowa, medical cadet in the Military Hospital at Keokuk, Iowa, and while performing the duties of cadet he also entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk, from which he graduated a Doctor of Medicine on the 31st of May, 1865. After prospecting awhile he located at Alto Vista, Daviess county, November 15,...

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Biography of Benjamin and Hosea Eastman

Tales of heroism have been the theme of song and story throughout all ages. He who has gone forth to battle for his country, his home or his principles, has figured in history, in literature and in music, and his bravery has stirred the souls of men through all times. All honor to such an one, and yet his heroism is no greater or his daring more pronounced than that of the honored pioneers of the west. Men reared in comfortable homes, accustomed to all the conveniences and privileges of life in the east, have come into the wild western districts and braved danger and hardships untold. Cut off from all comforts and luxuries, they have also had to face death at the hand of the treacherous Indian, and in little bands and oft times singly they have had to fight for liberty and life. Volumes have been written, yet the story of the pioneers has never been adequately told. They deserve all praise and honor and the mighty states of the west with their splendid improvements, enterprises and tokens of civilization are monuments to their memory. The Eastman Brothers, Benjamin Manson and Hosea Bradford, are among those who have founded the state of Idaho and brought about her present prosperity and greatness. They are now numbered among the leading business men of Boise, where many important business interests...

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Biography of L. C. Eastman

The quality of a man’s manhood has everything to do with not only the degree but with the quality of his success. In point of magnitude a man’s success may be great, but it may be of a character pitifully weak, if not dangerous to the public weal. The sold, substantial, honest and admirable success which brings a man not only money but the respect of his fellow men is the kind of success that has crowned the endeavors of the man whose name appears as the title of this article. L. C. Eastman, postmaster at Soda Springs, Idaho, and pioneer and leading druggist of that city, was born at Oskaloosa, Iowa, August 22, 1855, a son of Hon. Enoch and Caroline (Greenough) Eastman. The founder of this family of Eastman in America was Jeremiah Eastman, an English gentleman who had a fine place near some of the landed property of the king of England. Frequently, it is related, he was annoyed by the sheep belonging to His Majesty breaking into his grounds and injuring them. Remonstrance was vain. One day the animals invaded Mr. Eastman’s garden and destroyed it, and in driving them out, not any too gently perhaps, the wronged subject shot one of them, greatly to the displeasure of those who were presumed to have them in charge and to His Majesty’s personal displeasure also, it...

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Biographical Sketch of Seth Eastman

Seth Eastman, born in Brunswick, Maine, January 24, 1808; died in Washington, D. C., August 31, 1875. Was appointed to the Military Academy, West Point, at the age of 16, and was graduated June, 1829. Served at Fort Crawford and Fort Snelling, where he had ample opportunities for studying the Indians who frequented the posts. In November, 1831, he was detailed for duty at the Academy and retired from active service December, 1863. From 1850 to 1855 he was engaged in the preparation of the illustrations used in the work mentioned above, evidently under the supervision of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. View Dakotah Village, Dakotah...

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Biography of William Fisk Eastman

William Fiske Eastman, co-editor with P. S. McGlynn, of the Moline Daily Dispatch and Weekly Review-Dispatch, and postmaster of Moline, was born in Ellisburg, Jefferson County, New York, November 11, 1844. His parents were Charles W. Eastman, Doctor of Medicine, and Cynthia (Fiske) Eastman. He attended the public schools of his native village and Union Academy in the neighboring village of Belleville. Graduating there he attended Union College at Schenectady, New York, graduating in the scientific course in 1866, and taking first honors of that course. In the meantime he had been teaching in the district schools, earning in this way and by conducting a book store in his room at college, the money that paid for his college course. After graduating he came West and taught in the schools of Maquoketa, Iowa, and Sterling and Union Grove, Illinois, expecting to devote his life to that work. In 1872 his health broke down and he sought other business. He purchased the Red Oak (Iowa) Express and conducted it a few months when there came a proposition which he accepted, to go back to Sterling and purchase a half interest in the Sterling Gazette. He held his half interest in this for nearly ten years when he sold it because his health again broke down. He then went to Huron, South Dakota, where he engaged in banking with a partner,...

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