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Surname: Duncan

Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

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Swift Family of New Bedford, MA

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now SWIFT. For a hundred years and more the Swift family in and about New Bedford has been one of prominence, wealth. and influence, not only in the several local communities in which its members have resided but out through the Commonwealth and into the nation, where their extensive enterprises have extended. These Acushnet-New Bedford Swifts, a branch of the Cape Cod family, brought to their new field of effort that activity, industry, ability and honesty that had for generations characterized their forefathers and also the line of business that had enriched earlier generations in the old home section – the dealing in live oak timber and its manufacture into water craft, in shipbuilding for not only the United States government, but for those across the water. William Swift, the progenitor of the Swifts under consideration in this article, was at Watertown in the year 1634, and it seems had then been there some time, coming thither from Booking, England. He disposed of his estate in 1637, removed to Sandwich, and there died in January, 1644. His widow Joan, perhaps a second wife, made her will in October, 1662, mentioning therein her son William and his children. His daughter Hannah married Nov. 5, 1642, Daniel Wing. William Swift (2), son of William the settler, was born in...

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Captain McGehee, G. M. D. No. 673, Harrisonville District

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Captain McGehee, G. M. D. No. 673, Harrisonville District Allen, James A. Allen, John A. Allen, Matthew Arnold, John Bailey, Jeremiah Bailey, Joseph Bailey, William Baley, James W. Barnes, Micajah R. Beck, Jacob Bird, John Black, Joseph Brooks, Biving Brooks, Julius H. Brown, Robert W. Bruster, Sheriff Bryant, Ransom R. Butt, Frederick A. Cardin, Jesse Cardwell, James Cardwell, John Cawsey, Absalom Cawsey, William Chapman, Berry Clark, John Cobb, Samuel B. Coney, William Cook, Philip Cox, Thomas W. Dewberry, Giles Dewberry, John Duke, John M. Duke, Thomas Duncan, Nathaniel Edwards, Asa Evans, William G. Ford, Bartholomew Ford, Jesse Freel, Howell Fuller, David Furgerson, William Galding, Robert Germany, Augustus B. Germany, John P. Glenn, James, Esq. Goode, James S. Goode, Mackarness Gray, Thomas Greer, Henry Grice, Larry Hallsey, Benjamin L. Harrist, Archibald M. Harrist, Daniel Harrist, John Harrist, Thomas M. Hewston, James Hightower, Arnold Holderfield, John Holsey, Benjamin W. Holt, Thomas S. Horn, Joshua Howell, Philip Hutchins, Littleberry Jennings, Coleman Jennings, James R. Jennings, John Johnson, James F. Johnson, Sankey T. Johnston, Isham Johnston, James Johnston, Lindsey Johnston, Posey Johnston, Samuel A. Jones, Jefferson Justice, William Leath, William C. Lee, Athanatius Looser, John C. Loran, John Lyons, Robert Matthews, Frederick McGehee, William McKnight, William McLain, James Meacham, John Menefee, William Miller, Homer P. M. Mitcham, Hezekiah Mitcham, James...

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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Ralph Bacon Genealogy

The Bacon Family Genealogy descends the Bacon family tree through the children of Ralph Bacon, 2nd. Ralph was born in New York State abt the year 1777. At the age of 17, about the year 1794, he traveled to Painesville Ohio. Eventually acquiring some land there, he would marry Mary Jourden in 1801. In 1820 he moved his family to Crawford County, Ohio, owning houses and land in the townships of Liberty and Whetstone. His wife died 5 Oct 1845, he died 15 Jun 1849. This union would produce 13 offspring, twelve of whom would marry and raise families of their own. This Bacon Family Genealogy is their story.

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Church History of Norwich Vermont

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The great achievement of the first generation of Norwich settlers was the building of a meeting house. More than any other event of the time, with the possible exception of the accomplishment of the national independence, this was an undertaking that enlisted the energies and taxed the resources of our forefathers. The building of a meeting house in a New England frontier settlement a century ago was regarded a matter of public concern, to be supported by the whole community without regard to sect or party, like the opening of roads or any other public charge. In less than ten years from the time the first clearing was made in Norwich, the preliminary steps were taken to provide a meeting house to be used for the accommodation of the whole people in the public worship of God. The question of the location of this building was sharply agitated, re-resulting in a keen competition between different sections of the town for the coveted distinction, inasmuch as the location of the house was supposed to fix the site of a possible future village where much of the business of the town would be transacted. When it became apparent that no agreement could be reached, a locating committee of three men from out of town was chosen and summoned...

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Slave Narrative of Mrs. Duncan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now WAYNE CO. (Gertrude Vogler) [Mrs. Duncan:] “After the War was over mammie’s old man did not want us with them, so he threatened to kill us. Then my old mammie fixed us a little bundle of what few clothes we had and started us two children out to go back to the Campbell family in Albany. The road was just a wilderness and full of wild animals and varmints. Mammie gave us some powder and some matches, telling us to put a little down in the road every little while and set fire to it. This would scare the wild animals away from us. “We got to the river at almost dark and some old woman set us across the river in a canoe. She let us stay all night wit her, and we went on to ‘Grandpap Campbells” (We always called him grandpap instead of master, as the others did.) When he saw us comin’ he said ‘Lawd have mercy here comes them poor little chillun’. “I stayed with them that time until I was big enough to be a house girl. Then I went to live with the Harrison family in Albany; and I lived with them till I married old Sam Duncan and come to Wayne County to live. I’ve raised a family...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Lucy Duncan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Grant, Ward and Duncan)-Lucy A., daughter of Joseph H. Polly (Ward) Clark, was born February 7, 1848 on Beatty’s Prairie in Delaware District. She was educated in the Cherokee National Schools. Married December 25, 1869 Joshua B. Duncan, born December 13, 1835; and he died December 14, 1875. They were the parents of Helen Rosencrantz, born ; March 25, 1874, and Annie Ellen Duncan, born April 7, 1876. Mrs. Lucy A. Duncan, on August 30, 1877, married James A. Duncan the brother of her first husband, and he was born June 3, 1825. He died December 26, 1898. They were the parents of Jimmie Abercrombie, born October 30, 1879; Lucy Elizabeth, born March 14, 1884, and Charles DeWitt Duncan, born April 10, 1886. Delen R. Duncan is a very accomplished artist and makes her home in Columbia, Mo. Mrs. Duncan is the owner and proprietor of large farming interests near Afton. She is a member of the Methodist...

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Genealogy of the Cherokee Duncan Family

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Instructions on how to interpret this information 11 ___Dorcas. Benge and Young Charles Gordon Duncan  |A47 1112 Edmond Benge. Mary Rains _______ 2 John Duncan. Elizabeth Abercrombie 3 Rebecca Duncan. James Landrum 4 Emily Duncan. Alexander Kell 5 Elizabeth Duncan* 6 Lewis Duncan* 7 Charles Duncan. Mahala Abercrombie 111213 Charles R. Duncan. Judith Roach 2 Martha Duncan. David Jones OK 3 John R. Duncan* 4 Jennie Duncan. Thomas Carey 5 Edmond Duncan. Maria Richey and Barbara Ashley 6 William B. Duncan. Narcissa Reeves Foreman nee Carey 7 Lewis Duncan. Mary Spears 8 George Washington Duncan* Martha Carey and Margaret Scrimsher 9 Nathaniel Green Duncan. Ellen Martin 10 James R. Duncan. Elizabeth Dennis and Susan Bryant 11 Mary Duncan. James Martin, Samuel K. Weir, Thomas Hiekox and George W. Moore 12 Ross Cherokee Duncan. Mary Goddard and Susie MeLain 112213 Hannah Duncan. Ezekial Buffington McLaughlin A47. John Adair, a Scotchman, married Mrs. Ge-ho-ga Foster, a full. blood Cherokee of the Deer clan. She was a sister of Mrs. Dorcas Duncan, wife of Young Charles Gordon Duncan who was also a Scotchman. Adair had five children that lived to be grown and after her death he married Jennie Kilgore, a White woman, by whom he had ten children. Instructions on how to interpret this information 2 Emily Duncan....

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. John C. Duncan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Duncan, Mrs. John C. (See Grant, Duncan and Sanders)—Joanna Coody Rogers daughter of Charles Rogers Coody and Nancy (Patton) Rogers was born in Cooweescoowee District in 1861. Educat­ed in the Cherokee Nation Schools, graduating from the Female Seminary, June 30, 1881. Taught school. In 1885 she mar­ried at Fort Gibson, John Clinton, son of John Thompson and Elizabeth Ann (Sanders) Duncan, born in 1859 in Flint District, Cherokee Nation. He was educated in the Cherokee Public Schools and Male Seminary. Fortunate in having splendid educations, discriminative and appreciative minds, Mr. and Mrs. Duncan have always been...

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Biographical Sketch of John E. Duncan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (See Grant, Downing, and Duncan)-John Ellis, son of Reverend Walter Adair and Martha (Wilson) Duncan, was born March 26, 1861; educated in the Cherokee Nation. Married January 1, 1890, Susan Elizabeth, daughter of and Catherine (Emory) Carselowry, born July 30, 1873. They are the parents Ellis Crowell, Robert Stewart, Kathleen Nana, Albert Carselowry, Walter Abercrombie, Johnnie May, and Charles D. Duncan. Mr. Duncan was elected Clerk of Tahlequah District in 1893 and was the last elected High Sheriff of the Cherokee...

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Biography of James W. Duncan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now James W. Duncan, born in 1861, is the son of Morgan H. Duncan, a white man, and Penelope C. Craig, a Cherokee descended from Granny Ward, one of the most remarkable women of her time. Young Duncan came with his parents to the Cherokee Nation in 1869, settling in the Delaware district, near the line of Chetopa, Kansas, on the Neosho River. He attended the neighborhood schools until seventeen years of age, after which he went to the Vinita school, and at the age of twenty-three years entered the national male seminary, Tahlequah, graduating from there in 1885. Immediately afterward he was appointed to teach at Carey’s Ferry, and after one term became principal of the Vinita School, having two assistant teachers and one hundred sixty-nine pupils. Mr. Duncan, however, resigned his position before he had taught quite one year, in order to enter Emory College, Oxford, Georgia, where he remained four years, graduating with his B.A. degree in 1890. On his return he was elected professor of English and history in the Cherokee Male Seminary, and taught until the close of the term. Mr. Duncan, during the last general election in his country, took an active part in the defense and support of the National party, speaking publicly at the meetings in Delaware and Coowescowee...

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Biographical Sketch of N. E. Duncan

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now It is with pleasure that we are enabled to write concerning the estimable gentleman whose name is at the head of this article, since he has been one of the potent factors in the development of Harney county, has manifested wisdom and enterprise in all his ways here, has labored as a true pioneer in many other sections of the country and has always manifested the same unswerving integrity, moral uprightness and sound principles, having sustained a reputation as an exceptionally reliable man, and ever arraigned on the side of right. Mr. Duncan was born in Williamson county, Illinois, on March 27, 1838, being the son of Dudley W. and Elizabeth Duncan. On April 16, 1859, Mr. Duncan started to New Orleans on the Panama route to California. He had an adventurous spirit and was ready to grapple with the hard problems of pioneer life and has since proved himself of the right kind of stuff. He stopped five days on the way, at Havana, and then landed in San Francisco on May 16. He worked for wages until the fall of 1861, then went by steamer to Portland, Oregon. On April 16, 1863, he started to Auburn, Baker county, arriving there on the 16th of May, and for fifteen years he was numbered with the hardy...

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