Surname: Drummond

Campbell Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Some time between 1766 and 1768, Alexander Campbell removed from Damariscotta to Steuben, and built a mill at Tunk, now called Smithville, on the east side of the river. It was the first mill there. In 1759, he married Betsey Nickels, who was born in Ireland and came to Lynn, Mass., with her parents when about six years old. From Lynn, she came with her brother, Capt. William. Nickels, to Damariscotta. Children of Alexander and Betsey Campbell were: James, Frances, Hannah, Peggy, Polly, William, Samuel, Alexander, and Betsey.

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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Biographical Sketch of James P. Drummond

Was born in Monroe County, West Virginia, September 25, 1813. His parents were George and Easter Boyd Drummond, both natives of Virginia. Our subject was reared and educated in Virginia, his home being on his father’s farm. On June 14th, 1836, Mr. Drummond was married to Miss Sydney Nickell, daughter of George W. Nickell, both residents of Monroe County, Virginia. In the autumn of 1839 he left Virginia for. Daviess County, Missouri, and entered in the same year 160 acres of land in what is now known as Auberry Grove. When he had entered his land in this County he went to live for three years in Monroe County, Missouri. In 1842 he moved on his farm in Daviess County and has been a resident of this County ever since. Mr. and Mrs. Drummond are the parents of eleven children, whose names are as follows: Margaret N., now Mrs. Mann; Elizabeth E., now Mrs. Baldwin; Amanda J., now Mrs. Musselman; Mary, now Mrs. Barnett George W. and Andrew J., twins; William N.; John K.; Caroline, now Mrs. Jenkins; James M. and Charles W. Mrs. Drummond died in November, 1858. July 14, 1859, he married Miss Maria F. Mann, daughter of .John Mann, residents of this County. Our subject is a member of the Masonic order, Lodge No. 116, of Jamesport. He owns one of the finest farms in Daviess...

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Slave Narrative of Christine Mitchell

Interviewer: Martin Richardson Person Interviewed: Christine Mitchell Location: Saint Augustine, Florida Age: 84 Occupation: Field Worker An interesting description of the slave days just prior to the War Between the States is given by Christine Mitchell, of Saint Augustine. Christine was born in slavery at Saint Augustine, remaining on the plantation until she was about 10 years old. During her slave days she knew many of the slaves on plantations in the Saint Augustine vicinity. Several of these plantations, she says, were very large, and some of them had as many as 100 slaves. The ex-slave, who is now 84 years old, recalls that at least three of the plantations in the vicinity were owned or operated by Minorcans. She says that the Minorcans were popularly referred to in the section as “Turnbull’s Darkies,” a name they apparently resented. This caused many of them, she claims, to drop or change their names to Spanish or American surnames. Christine moved to Fernandina a few years after her freedom, and there lived near the southern tip of Amelia Island, where Negro ex-slaves lived in a small settlement all their own. This settlement still exists, although many of its former residents are either dead or have moved away. Christine describes the little Amelia Island community as practically self-sustaining, its residents raising their own food, meats, and other commodities. Fishing was a favorite...

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Slave Narrative of Fannie Alexander

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Fannie Alexander Location: Helena, Arkansas Age: 62 Occupation: Teacher “I was an orphant child. My mother-in-law told me during slavery she was a field hand. One day the overseer was going to whoop one of the women ’bout sompin or other and all the women started with the hoes to him and run him clear out of the field. They would killed him if he hadn’t got out of the way. She said the master hadn’t put a overseer over them for a long time. Some of ’em wouldn’t do their part and he put one of the men on the place over the women. He was a colored foreman. The women worked together and the men worked together in different fields. My mother-in-law was named Alice Drummond. She said they would cut the hoecakes in half and put that in your pan, then pour the beef stew on top. She said on Christmas day they had hot biscuits. They give them flour and things to make biscuit at home on Sundays. When they got through eating they take their plate and say, ‘Thank God for what I received.’ She said they had plenty milk. The churns was up high—five gallon churns. Some churns was cedar wood. The children would churn standing on a little stool. It would take two to churn. They...

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Biography of Anderson C. Smith

As a leader in the affairs of the counties of northeastern Oregon, both in times of difficulty with the Indians and also in the quieter times of civil industry, while also he has been a promoter of good government and of substantial progress in the county, the subject of this sketch stands today as one of the prominent and respected citizens of Wallowa county, having manifested both integrity and sound principles and marked capabilities in all of his career here. In addition to this, Mr. Smith has taken a leading part in the Indian councils that were far reaching to the entire northwest, while in his younger days he was one of the first that stepped to the standard, that had been insulted by the minions of treason, and in its defense he did valiant and intrepid service for his county. In Franklin County, Illinois, Mr. Anderson C. Smith was born in 1831, being the son of Benjamin F. and Sarah C. (Drummond) Smith. The parents lived in that county until the time of their departure from the scenes of earth and their remains lie buried there today. The first venture of our subject when he had arrived to the years of maturity was to rent land, and the proceeds of this were used in attending the academy in Benton and then afterwards he also continued in attendance, working...

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