Surname: Douglass

Cushman Family of Acushnet, MA

For perhaps fifty years there has lived in what is now Acushnet and figured largely in the industrial life of the locality a branch of the ancient and historic Cushman family of the Old Colony, in the immediate family of the late Emery Cushman, whose early life was passed in Duxbury; himself the founder of an enterprise here in which he was succeeded by his son and the latter by his sons, all of whom contributed through the manufacturing plant to the material progress and welfare of their locality.

It will be remembered that Robert Cushman was one of the most active and influential men in all of the preliminary movements of the Pilgrims in going to Leyden and thence to New England, he the ancestor of the Cushman family here in question, the marriage of whose son into the Howland family further identifies it with the “Mayflower” party.

There follows the history and genealogy of this Acushnet Cushman family in chronological order from this first American ancestor.

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Carleton Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

It appears by the records that there were four person who settled in the south part of the town by the name of Carleton, whose given names were Edward, Dudley, Moses and David, all from Andover, Massachusetts, and evidently brothers. They built the mills first known as Carleton’s mills, mentioned in the town records in 1770 for the first time when Dudley Carleton was elected a selectman, in 1771 was re-elected and in 1772 was chosen one of a committee to keep the fish course clear at Carleton’s mills.

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1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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Treaty of February 11, 1837

The said bands assent to the provisions of the treaties concluded on Aug. 5 and Sept 23, 1836, in which were ceded to the U.S. certain lands in the State of Indiana reserved for said bands by the treaties of Oct 26 and 27 1832, and hereby cede to the U.S. all their interest in said lands and agree to remove to a country that may be provided for them by the President of the U.S., SW of the Missouri river, within two years from the ratification of this treaty.

The U.S. agree to convey by patent to the Potawatomies of Indiana a tract of country, on the Osage river SW of the Missouri river sufficient in extent and adapted to their habits and wants.

The U.S. agree to purchase the “five sections in the prairie, near Rock Village” reserved for Qui-qui-to in the second article of the treaty of October 20th 1832 for the sum of $4,000.

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Slave Narrative of Alice Douglass

Person Interviewed: Alice Douglass Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Sumner County, Tennessee Date of Birth: December 22, 1860 Age: 73 I was born December 22, 1880 in Summer County, Tennessee. My mother, I mean mammy, ’cause what did we know ’bout mother and mama. Master and Mistress made dey chillun call all nigger women. “Black Harmy.” Jest as I was saying my mammy was named Millie Elkins and my pappy was named Isaac Garrett. My sisters and brothers was Frank, Susie and Mollie. They is all in Nashville, Tennessee right now. They lived in log houses. I ‘member my grandpappy and when he died. I allus slept in the Big House in a cradle wid white babies. We all the time wore cotton dresses and we weaved our own cloth. The boys jest wore shirts. Some wore shoes, and I sho’ did. I kin see ’em now as they measured my feets to git my shoes. We had doctors to wait on us iffen we got sick and ailing. We wore asafedida to keep all diseases offen us. When a nigger man got ready to marry, he go and tell his master that they was a woman on sech and sech a farm that he’d lak to have. Iffen master give his resent, then he go and ask her master and iffen he say yes, well, they...

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Biographical Sketch of John Douglass

John Douglass lived on the place now owned by C. and C. E. Ward; Colonel Benajah Douglass on the place where his son N. B. Douglass now lives. N B. Douglass and his three children, James, Maria, and Lilian, are the only descendants in town of James Marsh...

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Biographical Sketch of James Marsh Douglass

The same year James Marsh Douglass, from Cornwall, Conn., pitched in the south part of the town on a lot afterwards occupied by Elias Douglass, and later still by Eli Stevens. He probably remained here most of the time until 1784, when he brought his family from Connecticut. He owned about five hundred acres in different lots in this vicinity, and apparently intended to have his sons settle about him. He died, however, in 1790, and the estate was divided among his...

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Biography of Robert Douglass, A. V., M. D.

Robert Douglass, the oldest physician and surgeon in Port Elgin, is a native of this Province, dating ‘his birth in the Township of Nelson, County of Halton, June 8, 1833. His father, Robert Douglass, senior, was from the State of New York; his grandfather from Scotland. His mother was Jane McGill, from Belfast, Ireland. Dr. Douglass was educated in the Arts at Queen’s College, Kingston, being graduated in 1851, and spent one year in the study of medicine at the same institution, and three years at Trinity College, Toronto; received the Degree of M.D. from the former school in 1855. He practiced three or four years at Jarvis, County of Haldimand, and after a respite of one year or more on account of ill health settled in Port Elgin in the spring of 1861. He soon built up a good practice, has stuck close to his profession, and has made it a success. His reputation for skill is excellent. Dr. Douglass has been a Coroner of the county for the last fifteen or sixteen years, and is a member of the School Board, giving considerable attention to educational matters, for which his own thorough drill in the sciences at an early day eminently qualified him. Dr. Douglass is an. earnest Reformer, and in 1867 was the candidate of his party for the House of Commons, for the North Riding...

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Biographical Sketch of George Douglass, M.D.

George Douglass, M.D., was born in Canada in 1843; graduated in 1868 from the Eclectic Medical College of Ohio; came to Iowa in 1870, and settled in Iowa County. He removed to Sioux City in 1872, where he is now in the practice of his profession. He held the office of county physician for several years, and in 1871, he married Sarah Tufts, daughter of John Tufts, of Grinnell, Iowa. They have one...

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Slave Narrative of Ambrose Douglass

Interviewer: Martin D. Richardson Person Interviewed: Ambrose Douglass Location: Brooksville, Florida Age: 92 In 1861, when he was 16 years old, Ambrose Hilliard Douglass was given a sound beating by his North Carolina master because he attempted to refuse the mate that had been given to him–with the instructions to produce a healthy boy-child by her–and a long argument on the value of having good, strong, healthy children. In 1937, at the age of 92, Ambrose Douglass welcomed his 38th child into the world. The near-centenarian lives near Brooksville, in Hernando County, on a run-down farm that he no longer attempts to tend now that most of his 38 children have deserted the farm for the more lucrative employment of the cities of the phosphate camps. Douglass was born free in Detroit in 1845. His parents returned South to visit relatives still in slavery, and were soon reenslaved themselves, with their children. Ambrose was one of these. For 21 years he remained in slavery; sometimes at the plantation of his original master in North Carolina, sometimes in other sections after he had been sold to different masters. “Yassuh, I been sold a lot of times”, the old man states. “Our master didn’t believe in keeping a house, a horse or a darky after he had a chance to make some money on him. Mostly, though, I was sold when...

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Death of Frederick Douglass

The unexpected and sudden death of Mr. Douglass has awakened a sense of profound sympathy never before expressed toward a person identified with the Negro race, and seldom toward one of the white race. We are not surprised at the manifestations of profound respect and sorrow of the colored people, and we rejoice, too, that the white race has shown almost equal regard for his memory, by their attendance when he lay in state in Washington, and when his body was interred in Rochester. The press has voiced the sentiment of the nation in the full and eulogistic notices of his life. Frederick Douglass deserved it all. No man, perhaps, in this country has broken through so heavy a crust of ignorance, poverty and race prejudice as was done by this boy born on a slave plantation, stealing his education, fleeing from his slave home and then achieving for himself a rank among the foremost men of the nation in intelligence, eloquence and of personal influence in the great anti-slavery struggle of this country. He has achieved honors in the public service of the nation, and has faithfully and honorably fulfilled every trust laid upon him. Mr. Douglass is among the last survivors of that band of Abolitionists that were so potent in their influence in arousing the nation to the evils of slavery. The recent death of Theodore...

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