Surname: Dewey

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Descendants of Edmund Hobart

The East Bridgewater family bearing this name, the head of which was the late Hon. Aaron Hobart, long one of the town’s leading citizens and substantial men, and whose father before Him, Hon. Aaron Hobart, was an eminent lawyer and efficient public servant, holding many positions of trust and responsibility, State senator, member of the United States Congress, etc., is a branch of the older Abington Hobart family, in which town the Hobarts were long prominent, and that a branch of the still older Hingham family of the name. It is the purpose here to consider the East Bridgewater...

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1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Hutchinson Family of Norwich Vermont

Hutchinson is an old and numerous family in Norwich, as well as in other parts of the country. They were among the early settlers of Massachusetts and were in Lynn and Salem in that colony as early as 1628, or 1629. A descendant of these early colonists, named Abijah, who was a tailor, removed from Salem to Windham early in the eighteenth century. His son Samuel, born about 1719, in company with his son, John, came to Norwich in 1765. They cleared an island in the Connecticut River, opposite the present residency of John W. Loveland, and planted it with corn. In the fall of that year they returned to Connecticut, and in company with a younger son, Samuel, returned in the spring of 1766, and made a permanent settlement. The elder Samuel spent the remainder of his life in the town, and died February 8, 1809. His wife was Jemina Dunham; she died January 12, 1798. Besides the two sons named above, he had three daughters: Sarah, married Francis Smalley; Tabitha, married Jonathan Delano; Jerusha, married Nathan Roberts. They all died young,’ soon after marriage. Hutchinson, John, son of Samuel, was born in 1741, in Windham, Connecticut, and married Mary Wilson, who was born in Ashford, Connecticut, in August, 1744. He enlisted in the Continental Army, and died at Philadelphia, June 22, 1778. His widow afterwards married Solomon...

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Free Masonry in Norwich Vermont

It does not appear that any Masonic Lodge has ever existed in Norwich. Quite a number of our citizens, however, as might be expected, have at different times belonged to lodges in adjacent towns. In the list of members of Franklin Lodge, established at Hanover, N. H., in 1796, we find the names of the following Norwich men, with the year of their admission: Reuben Hatch, Freegrace Leavitt (1798), William Sumner (1799), Thomas Brigham, Erastus Leavitt, and Moses Hayward (1800), Reuben Partridge, Andrew Dewey, William Little, Levi Richards, Aaron West (1801-1807), Lyman Lewis, Elijah Slafter, Simon Baldwin, Enos Lewis, Jasper Johnson, Noah Lewis (1808), Charles Hutchins, Sewell Gleason (1809), Ephraim Hall, George Olds, Jr., and Pierce Burton (1810), Manly G. Woodbury, Silas Morse, Ammi B. Allen, and Barzilla Bush, Jr. (1813-1820). The roll probably bears other Norwich names that we do not now recognize. The Franklin Lodge was moved to Lebanon in 1821, where it still flourishes. In 1807 and 1808, Doctor Thomas Brigham of Norwich was master of the lodge, who, on his sudden departure from town and abandonment of his family, was promptly expelled therefrom by notice published in the Vermont Journal at Windsor, in April, 1809, ”for immoral conduct unworthy a Mason and a gentleman.” Other Norwich Masons of that time, not of the Franklin Lodge, were Captain Calvin Seaver, Jeremiah Bissell, Ebenezer Spear, 2nd, Lyman...

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A Brief History of Norwich University

In 1835, the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy became “Norwich University,” by virtue of an act of incorporation granted by the legislature of Vermont the previous year. Captain Alden Partridge remained at the head of the institution until 1843, and soon after sold the buildings and grounds to the Trustees of the University. There was one feature in the scheme of education established at Norwich University which honorably distinguished it from nearly all other similar institutions of its time in New England. From the first it was wholly free from sectarian influence. This principle was prominently set forth...

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Biographical Sketch of Noble S. Dewey

Dewey, Noble S., Middlebury, was born in Middlebury, Addison county, Vt., in February, 1835. His parents were Enoch and Sallie (Cushman) Dewey. He was educated in the common schools, and brought up to farming, remaining at home until becoming of age, when he went to New York city, where he engaged in the wall paper and window curtain business with his brother, J. E. Dewey, and remained there until 1882, when he settled on the place formerly the home of his father, Enoch Dewey. He engaged in farming seventy-five acres in addition to the home place, and also the former Leland place of 135 acres. He occupies a residence which was built by his father as early as 1810. He was married on April 2, 1861, to Alice L. Leland, who was a daughter of F. A. and B. J. Leland. F. A. Leland is now living and is in his seventy-fourth year. They have had six children born to them, of whom three are now living, two daughters and one son — Carrie L., Robert A., and Florence E. Mr. Dewey is a self-made man and a very prosperous...

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Biographical Sketch of Homer W. Dewey

Dewey, Homer W., Middlebury, was born in Whiting, Addison county, Vt., on May 10, 1828. His parents were Truman and Elizabeth (Pratt) Dewey. Truman Dewey was born in Connecticut, and came to Addison county, Vt., with his mother and her family about 1785, settling in West Salisbury, Vt., and cleared a place there. He was a farmer and lived in various towns, and was a justice of the peace for many years. He had a family of two daughters and six sons, five of whom are now living. He died on April 1, 1864. Homer W. Dewey was educated in the common schools and received a fair education, and was brought up to farming at home until he reached the age of twenty-one years, when he learned the painter’s trade, a trade which he has followed ever since. He was married on March 20, 1857, to Eliza A. Woodcock, a daughter of Almon Woodcock, of Salisbury, Vt. They have had two children, one daughter and one son — Clara (now Mrs. Arthur Peacock, a resident of Waterford, Wis.) and Earnest T. (who resides with his parents). Mr. Dewey came to East Middlebury in the spring of 1874, where he has since resided. He is one of the prominent men of his...

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Biography of Colonel William H. Dewey

Among the prominent influential citizens of Idaho, Colonel Dewey, of Dewey, enjoys a unique position and reputation. He is a pioneer Idahoan in the true sense of that word, and the marvelous development of the interests and industries of his adopted state is largely attributable to his enterprise and sagacity. He is a man of remarkable resources, and has never failed to measure fully up to all the requirements and emergencies of life. Although over seventy years old, he is well preserved and exhibits unabated vigor of mind and body. Colonel Dewey is a native of the state of New York, and his first American ancestors were early settlers in Massachusetts. In the autumn of 1863 he came to Idaho and located where the town of Dewey now is, but subsequently removed to where the town of Ruby City was located, and with others, March 21, 1864, laid out the town of Silver City. The gentleman whose name introduces this review is a born miner, and from his first arrival in Idaho the Colonel became prominently connected with the mining interests of the northwest, in which connection it is perfectly fair to say that he has been one of the leading and principal factors in the development of the mineral resources of this state. He owned nearly half of the South Mountain camp during the period of its greatest...

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Biographical Sketch of H. P. Dewey

H. P. Dewey, lumber dealer, and a prominent citizen of Tullahoma, was born in Michigan in 1838, and is the son of Cyrus J. and Maria (Beulah) Dewey, natives of the Green Mountain State. The father was born in 1812 and died in 1864, and the mother was born in 1813 and died in 1853. Both were members of the Old School Presbyterian Church. Our subject was raised in Washington County, Michigan, and educated in the public schools and at Monroe College, Michigan. He farmed and attended school alternately until the fall of 1862; he became a member of Company H, Eighteenth Regiment Michigan Infantry, and served until honorably discharged in June 1865. He then spent a year in Iowa at general merchandising. He returned to Michigan in 1867, and after a year’s farming, engaged in steam saw milling. In 1874 the firm removed their mill to Franklin County, Tennessee, six miles below Winchester. In 1880 he was appointed United States guager in the revenue department and in 1881 came to Tullahoma. He engaged in his present business in the spring of 1886. Mr. Dewey was married, January 16, 1866, to Minnie E., daughter of Nathaniel Gardner, of Coldwater, Michigan, she being born in 1849. Their two children are Lillie E., born October 1867, and Eddie L., born November 1869. He was elected alderman in 1885, receiving 328 out...

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Frank A. Dewey

1st Class Private, Inf., Co. D, 30th Div., 119th Regt. Born in Wayne County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Dewey. Entered the service April 27, 1915, at Goldsboro, N.C. Sent to Camp Glenn and then transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. Sailed for France May 27, 1918. Fought in all actions of 30th Div., up to the time of receiving shrapnel wound at Cambrai and St. Quentin Front, Oct. 17, 1918. Sent to Base Hospital 33, English Fosett Roads. Enlisted in N.C. N. G. was in actual duty June 19, 1916, to Jan. 26, 1919. Served on Mexican border seven months. Returned to USA Dec. 16, 1918. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 26,...

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Julia Eliza Todd Smith of Jackson MI

SMITH, Julia Eliza Todd7, (Daniel6, Daniel5, Daniel4, Daniel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born July 5, 1825, in East Rodman, N. Y., died Nov. 30, 1898, in Jackson, Mich. She married in Rodman, N. Y., Jan. 1, 1846, Andrew Jackson Smith, who was born May 3, 1825, died May 15, 1852. Children: I. Milo Ezra, b. April 21, 1848, in Rodman, N. Y., d. Nov. 20, 1903, in Mason, Wash. II. Florence Amelia, b. June 30, 1850, in Rodman, N. Y., m. Jan. 19, 1871, George Smith Dewey, they live in Jackson, Mich. Issue: (1) Claude C., b. Nov. 17, 1873; (2) Ada I., b. March 22, 1876; (3) Merritt O., b. Aug. 23, 1878; (4) Glen, b. April 30, 1887, twin with next; (5) Genevieve, b. April 30, 1887. III. Alice Melissa, b. Oct. 13, 1852, in Rodman, N. Y., there she died July 13,...

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Biography of Melvil Dewey

MELVIL DEWEY AMONG the noted librarians of our country who have shown great efficiency, untiring devotion and unusual progressiveness in their calling, stands in the front rank Melvil Dewey, director of the state library and secretary of the University of the State of New York. Born December 10, 1851, in the rural village of Adams Center, Jefferson county, New York, he is the youngest son of Joel and Eliza Green Dewey. His love of books – a love which has never forsaken him – began as soon as he was able to read. His greatest delight was to be among books, arranging and classifying them to suit his juvenile ideas. He loved also to call them his own. Like Dr. Isaac Watts when a child, he would say when money was given to him: “A book, a book; buy a book.” When, in 1864, the present edition of Webster’s unabridged dictionary came out, this incipient librarian went ten miles to the book store in Watertown, and brought home the coveted volume for which he paid $12 of his own childish savings, the largest coin of which was a five-cent piece. In 1865, when the collegiate institute was opened at Adams, three miles away, our boy was, of course, there as a pupil on the day of opening, and in 1867 he was one of the last students to leave...

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