Surname: Davidson

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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Higbee Graveyard Madison Indiana

This is an historical transcription of Higbee Cemetery, Madison, Jefferson County, Indiana which was transcribed in 1941 as part of the WPA cemetery transcription project. The value of this transcription is that in many cases they transcribed headstones which may today no longer exist. Had it not been for this project, created to provide employment opportunities during the depression, these records may have been lost due to the natural regression of cemeteries. Many of the cemeteries may be known by a different name today, we use the name they were identified as in 1941. Davidson, Thomas, Apr 22 1767...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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List of the Drummond Island Voyageurs

In 1828 the transfer of the British garrison from Drummond Island to Penetanguishene commenced. A list of voyageurs who resided on Drummond Island at the time of the transfer. In many cases a brief biographical sketch is contained which may provide clues to their ethnicity, family relationships, and the location where they or their ancestors settled.

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Biographical Sketch of Alexander Davidson

Alexander Davidson, of South Carolina, married Sarah Ellis, and settled in Kentucky, from whence, in 1821, he removed to Missouri and settled in Montgomery County. They had three children John, Abraham and Rachel. Abraham was married first to Mary Branson, by whom he had twelve children Alexander, Alfred, Abraham, Stout B., Franklin, Hezekiah, Elizabeth, Sarah, Rachel, Mary, Louisa, and Martha. His first wife died and he was married the second time to the widow Hub-bard, by whom he had William and John A. Mr. Davidson was not out of the County during the last forty-five years of his...

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Address of Col. Allen T. Davidson at Lyceum Asheville, North Carolina

Extract from an Address delivered by Col. Allen T. Davidson, at Lyceum Asheville, N.C. Nov. 7th, 1890. “The most noted characters of the County who were in public life, were John Welch, General Thomas Love and Col Robert Love. These represented the County of Haywood for many years; preserved and maintained a high reputation until their death. Some of these had formerly represented Buncombe County in the Legislature; notably, Thomas Love, who represented Buncombe County from 1800 to 1808 (the sessions of the Legislature were then annual) afterwards served from Haywood form 1808 to 1828, perhaps, the longest service of any one man in the State continuously. He afterwards moved to Macon District of Tennessee; was elected to the Legislature from that State, and was mad Presiding Officer of the Senate. He was a man of very fine appearance. More that six feet tall, very popular, and a fine electioneer. Many amusing stories are told of him, such as carrying garden seeds in his pockets, and distributing them, always with the assurance that his wife had remembered the voters wife and sent them with her regards. The old gentlemen was fond of a good toddy, but did no resort to the mean subterfuge of electioneering with liquor. On one occasion, however, it is said of him that he signed a pledge of the temperance society which was then very...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Ermine Josephine Davidson

(See Ward and Ghigau)-Felix Grundy, son of Isaac and Lucy (Arthur) Nidiffer, was born March 16, 1853. Married April 23, 1876, Joanna Ruth, daughter of John Ross Ana Annie (Hildebrand) Lender, born February 8, 1861. Felix Grundy Nidiffer died October 16, 1896. She died July 2, 1911. They were the parents of Ermina Josephine Nidiffer, born September 2, 1877. Educated in the Female Seminary. Married at Afton March 21, 1899, Thomas David son of William and Jane Davidson, born April 27, 1871, in Bates County, Missouri. They are the parents of Anna Laura, born December 21, 1899, married Everett Holt; Ruth Jane, born June 23, 1902, married Clyde E. Andrews; Athelene, born July 22, 1904, married Hallet Peace; Cecil Kornegay, born November 9, 1906; Thomas Eugene, born June 26, 1910; Freeman Edward, born June 23, 1912; Mary Elizabeth, born November 18, 1914 and Olive Louise Davidson, born June 24, 1918. Everett and Anna Lura Holt are the parents of: Kenneth Eugene, born February 20, 1918; Evelyn Marie, boron September 9, 1919 and Maurice Clyde Hereford Holt, born May 21,...

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Slave Narrative of Caroline Hammond

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Caroline Hammond Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Anne Arundel County MD Date of Birth: 1844 Place of Residence: 4710 Road, Baltimore, MD Interview at her home, 4710 Falls Road, Baltimore, Md. “I was born in Anne Arundel County near Davidsonville about 3 miles from South River in the year 1844. The daughter of a free man and a slave woman, who was owned by Thomas Davidson, a slave owner and farmer of Anne Arundel. He had a large farm and about 25 slaves on his farm all of whom lived in small huts with the exception of several of the household help who ate and slept in the manor house. My mother being one of the household slaves, enjoyed certain privileges that the farm slaves did not. She was the head cook of Mr. Davidson’s household. “Mr. Davidson and his family were considered people of high social standing in Annapolis and the people in the county. Mr. Davidson entertained on a large scale, especially many of the officers of the Naval Academy at Annapolis and his friends from Baltimore. Mrs. Davidson’s dishes were considered the finest, and to receive an invitation from the Davidsons meant that you would enjoy Maryland’s finest terrapin and chicken besides the best wine and champagne on the market. “All of the cooking was supervised by mother, and the table...

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Slave Narrative of Mrs. Hannah Davidson

Interviewer: K. Osthimer Person Interviewed: Hannah Davidson Location: Toledo, Ohio Place of Birth: Ballard County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1852 Place of Residence: 533 Woodland Avenue, Toledo, Ohio Mrs. Hannah Davidson occupies two rooms in a home at 533 Woodland Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. Born on a plantation in Ballard County, Kentucky, in 1852, she is today a little, white haired old lady. Dark, flashing eyes peer through her spectacles. Always quick to learn, she has taught herself to read. She says, “I could always spell almost everything.” She has eagerly sought education. Much of her ability to read has been gained from attendance in recent years in WPA “opportunity classes” in the city. Today, this warm hearted, quiet little Negro woman ekes out a bare existence on an old age pension of $23.00 a month. It is with regret that she recalls the shadows and sufferings of the past. She says, “It is best not to talk about them. The things that my sister May and I suffered were so terrible that people would not believe them. It is best not to have such things in our memory.” “My father and mother were Isaac and Nancy Meriwether,” she stated. “All the slaves went under the name of my master and mistress, Emmett and Susan Meriwether. I had four sisters and two brothers. There was Adeline, Dorah, Alice, and Lizzie....

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Biography of George Davidson

eorge Davidson, sheriff of the county of Waterloo, is a son of John and Margaret Davidson, and was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, May 15, 1814. Both parents belonged to Aberdeen families. John Davidson was a merchant, and burgess of Aberdeen, retiring from business in 1833 and dying in 1853. Our subject was educated at Aberdeen; studied law for about four years in the same place; came to Canada alone in 1835; and took up 200 acres of land partially cleared, in the township of Woolwich, county of Waterloo; and improved it until about 1841, when he moved into Berlin; here bought out a mercantile establishment; traded alone a few years, then took into partnership his younger brother, William Davidson; went himself to New Aberdeen, six miles from Berlin, and there built a saw mill and grist mill, opened a store and a farm of 500 acres, and remained there until the spring of 1852, when he retired from business and returned to Berlin. The next January he became sheriff of the county, and has held that office for twenty-seven years. Sheriff Davidson was the first postmaster at Berlin, receiving his appointment from the British Government; he was also the first postmaster at New Aberdeen; and held many years ago, at sundry times, the offices of township and county councilman and school trustee. He went into the military service as...

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Biography of General William Davidson

General William Davidson was the youngest son of George Davidson, and born in 1746. His father moved from Lancaster county, in Pennsylvania, in 1750, to North Carolina, and settled in the western part of Rowan county (now Iredell.) Here General Davidson received his earliest mental training, and subsequently his principal and final education at Queen’s Museum College in Charlotte, where many of the patriots of Mecklenburg and surrounding counties were educated. At the Provincial Congress which met at Halifax, on on the 4th of April, 1776, four additional regiments to the two already in service, were ordered to be raised, over one of which (the 4th) Thomas Polk was appointed Colonel, James Thackston Lieutenant Colonel, and William Davidson Major. With this regiment, under General Francis Nash, he marched to join the army of the North, under General Washington, where he served until November 1779, when the North Carolina line was ordered south to reinforce General Lincoln, at Charleston. Previous to this time he had been promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the line. As the troops passed through North Carolina, Colonel Davidson obtained a furlough for a few days to visit his family, whom he had not seen for three years. This saved him from the fate which befell Gen. Lincoln and his army at Charleston; for, when he approached that city, he found it so closely invested...

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Biographical Sketch of John Davidson

“John Davidson” was born in Pennsylvania in 1736. He performed much civil and military service to secure the independence of his country. He was appointed by the Provincial Congress, which met at Halifax on the 4th of April, 1776, a field officer (Major) with Adam Alexander as Colonel, John Phifer as Lieutenant Colonel, and George A. Alexander as second Major. He was with General Sumpter in August, 1780, at the battle of the Hanging Rock, and was a General in the State militia service. He was enterprising, and successful in business. With Alexander Brevard, and Joseph Graham, his sons-in-law, he established Vesuvius Furnace and Tirza Forge iron works in Lincoln county. He married Violet, daughter of Samuel Wilson, Sr., and raised a large family. His daughter, Isabella, married Joseph Graham; Rebecca married Alexander Brevard; Violet married William Bain Alexander, son of John McKnitt Alexander; Elizabeth married William Lee Davidson, son of General Davidson, who fell at Cowan’s Ford; Mary married Dr. William McLean; Sallie married Alexander Caldwell, son of Rev. David Caldwell, of Guilford county; Margaret married Major James Harris. He had only two sons, John (or “Jackey”) and Robert; John married Sallie Brevard, daughter of Adam Brevard; Robert married Margaret Osborne, daughter of Adlai Osborne, grandfather of the late Judge James W. Osborne, of Charlotte. Major Davidson’s residence was about one mile east of Toole’s Ford, on the...

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