Surname: Currier

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Partridge Family of Norwich Vermont

Samuel Partridge, Sr., was born in Preston, Connecticut, in 1721. He married Ruth Woodward, and with her and seven of their children (one son remaining in Connecticut to care for the “old folks”) came to Norwich for a permanent settlement about 1765, and settled on a hill farm about one mile west from Norwich village, which farm remained in the possession of the Partridge family for three generations, until sold by the representatives of the estate of Abel Partridge, of the third generation, to the late Deacon John Dutton, who demolished the old mansion. The farm is now owned by the widow of the late Ambrose Currier. By a commission issued by his ”Excellency, Henry Moore, Baronet, Captain General and Governor-in-Chief in and over the Province of New York,” etc., bearing date, the 30th September, 1776, Mr. Partridge was made a lieutenant in the “Regiment of Militia Foot, to consist of the Inhabitants of Norwich in the County of Cumberland, in the Province of New York.” Mr. Partridge died in Norwich Aug. 24, 1826, aged eighty-five years, and his wife passed away April 29, 1786, in the sixty-seventh year of her age. To them were born: Elisha Partridge, who married Margaret, a daughter of Mr. Thomas Murdock, Nov. 14, 1765. Samuel Partridge, Jr., married Elizabeth Wright, daughter of Aaron and Elizabeth (Bliss) Wright, Dec. 6, 1770. Alden Partridge. Isaac...

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Murdock Family of Norwich Vermont

Hon. Thomas Murdock removed to Norwich from Preston, Connecticut, as early as 1767 (in which year he was recorded a voter in town), and located on the farm a little north of Norwich Plain and subsequently occupied by Jared Goodell, George Blanchard, Harvey Knights, and now by Judd Leonard. He married Elizabeth Hatch (sister of John and Joseph Hatch, early settlers in Norwich), to whom were born: Asahel, Constant, Jasper, Thomas, Jr., Anna, who became the wife of Ebenezer Brown, Esq., the first lawyer to locate in Norwich, and Margaret, who married Elisha Partridge, November 14, 1765. Mr. Murdock was prominent in both state and local matters, the offices held by him being noticed in other chapters of this book. He died Dec. 5, 1803, followed by his wife in 1814. Asahel, the eldest son, was a voter in Norwich as early as 1782. He married Elizabeth Starkweather in 1779, and they became the parents of six children. He returned to Connecticut in 1800. Constant was a voter in Norwich as early as 1784. By his first wife, Sarah Jewett, he had one child, and by his second wife, Lucy Riley, he had eight children. His home was in the fine residence now occupied by Albert Davis, on the hill a little north of Norwich village. He died in Norwich in 1828, aged 67 years. His first wife died...

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History of the Merchants of Norwich VT

Peter Olcott had a store near his residence at the Center, in the time of the Revolutionary War. Abel Curtis was for a time associated with him in this business. Stephen Burton, eldest son of Elisha Burton and a graduate of Dartmouth College in 1790, was probably the first to open trade at Norwich Plain, prior to the year 1800. Ichabod Marshall of Hanover, also a Dartmouth graduate in 1790, is understood as having been engaged in mercantile business in Norwich (possibly in partnership with Stephen Burton) for several years. Both these young men emigrated to the West early...

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History of the Industries of Norwich VT

Although the products of the industries in Norwich have not been of great magnitude they have been quite varied in character. Such information in regard to these callings as we have been able to obtain we will present to our readers, though not in strict chronological order. Among the earliest establishments coming under this head was a grist mill established as early as 1770, by Hatch and Babcock on Blood Brook, on or near the site of the grist mill now operated by J. E. Willard, a short distance up the stream from where it empties into the Connecticut...

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Postmasters and Postal Service in Norwich Vermont

It was fifteen years after the admission of Vermont into the Federal Union, and forty years after the settlement of the town, before Norwich had a post office. The first post office was established at Norwich Plain, July 1, 1805, and Jacob Burton was appointed postmaster. Postmaster Burton kept the office in his harness shop on the main street of the village, nearly opposite the present residence of Mrs. William E. Lewis. Probably the duties of the office were not so great as to interfere much with the prosecution of his trade. It is doubtful if Mr. Burton had...

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that...

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First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied...

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Old Norfolk County Massachusetts Records

May 17, 1654, Jno Ward of Haverhill and wife Alice conveyed to Elizabeth Lilford of Haverhill (wife of Tho: Lilford) 4-acre house lot. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Rich: Ormsby. Ack. before Tho: Wiggin May 15, 1658. April 22, 1659, Robert Swan of Haverhill and wife Elizabeth, for £r6, conveyed to John Jonson of Haverhill 6 acres of houselot I bought of Mathias Button, bounded by Theophilus Satchwell, etc. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Symon Bradstreet Oct. 13, 1661. Oct. 12, 1661, Obadiah Eyer (his mark) of Haverhill and wife Hannah, for £5 l0s., conveyed to John Jonson of Haverhill 4 acres in flaggy meadow, bounded by Edward Clarke and Jno Eyer. Wit Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Simon Bradstreet Oct. 13, 1661. April 21, 1659, William Simons (also Simmons) (his M mark) of Haverhill and wife Elizabeth, for £8 10s., conveyed to John Jonson of Haverhill 3 acres of houselot I bought of Theophilus Satchwell, bounded by Daniel Ladd, etc. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Simon Bradstreet Oct. 13, 1661. April 19, 1661, James Davis, sr., (his mark) and wife Cisley (her mark) of Haverhill, for £10, conveyed to George Brown of Haverhill 2 acres of my houselot on the side next grantee’s houselot. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Symon Bradstreet Oct. 17, 1661. Thomas Barnet (signed Barnerd;...

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Biography of David M. Currier, M.D.

David M. Currier, M.D., a successful physician of Newport, was born in Grafton, Grafton County, September 15, 1840, son of David and Rhoda (Morse) Currier. The grandfather, David Currier, presumably came from Salisbury, Mass., and located in Canaan, where he became the owner of a good tract of land, and died at the age of seventy-one years. He married February 2, 1797, Ruth Stevens, David, born February 8, 1803; Edward, born June 12, 1805; Aaron, born September 10, 1813; Dorothy, born January 28, 1799; and Hannah, born June 23, 1800. David, the father of Dr. Currier, was also a farmer. His active life was spent in Canaan and in Grafton. At a later date he moved to the farm, where he died July 2, 1862. His death resulted from injuries from the fall of a tree upon him while at work in the woods. He married Rhoda Morse, who was born in Enfield in 1807, and died March 31, 1894. He was a Free Will Baptist. In his last years he was a Republican. His children were: Rhoda M., who died when two years old; Amanda M. Hadley, who died sixty years of age; Ruth S. Leeds, who lives in Orange, N.H.; Mary Y. Diamond, also a resident of Orange; David M., the subject of this sketch; and William H. Currier, who is a travelling salesman, residing in South...

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Biographical Sketch of John J. Currier

Currier, John J.; jeweler; born, Cleveland, Sept. 7, 1877; son of Daniel and Mary Dunn Currier; educated at St. Augustine’s School; married, Cleveland, Nov. 23, 1904, Theresa Helen Deininger; issue, one son and one daughter; in 1891, went with the Webb C. Ball Co.; eight years in their employ; then with Sigler Bros., for four years, with the Force Bros. Co. for three years; now own business, located at 2631 W. 14th St.; member Knights of Columbus, Augustine Club, The Deutsche, and Tuxedo Clubs; sec’y Jennings Square Business Men’s Ass’n; also...

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Biographical Sketch of Israel Currier

Israel Currier, from Corrinth, Vt., came to Wolcott about 1836, and located upon the farm he now occupies, on road 30. He built his present dwelling in 1851. His father, David, was a ship carpenter of Salisbury, Mass., and served in the Revolutionary...

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