Surname: Crary

Dwelly Family of Fall River, MA

DWELLY (Fall River family). The name Dwelly is an uncommon one and the family not numerous in New England annals. The Fall River Dwelly family is a branch of the Rhode Island family and it of the Scituate (Mass.) family, the immediate Fall River family here considered being that of Dr. Jerome Dwelly, who for some threescore or more years has administered to the ailments of humanity in and about Fall River, where he has most surely been to this people the “beloved physician” and one of the city’s substantial men. In the succeeding generation, one of his sons – the late Frank H. Dwelly – was the treasurer of both the Tecumseh Mills and the Ancona Company, extensive manufacturing concerns of Fall River. Here follows in detail and chronologically arranged from the first known American ancestor of the family the history of this Fall River branch of the Dwelly family. Richard Dwelly, of Scituate in 1665, or earlier, probably the same who was in Lancaster in 1654, and in Hingham in 1663, sold his estate in Hingham and removed to Scituate. His farm in the latter place was on the road leading from the third Herring brook to the harbor. For service in King Philip’s war he received a grant of land between Cornet’s mill and the Plymouth road. He had meadow land at Till’s creek, which stream...

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Hutchinson Family of Norwich Vermont

Hutchinson is an old and numerous family in Norwich, as well as in other parts of the country. They were among the early settlers of Massachusetts and were in Lynn and Salem in that colony as early as 1628, or 1629. A descendant of these early colonists, named Abijah, who was a tailor, removed from Salem to Windham early in the eighteenth century. His son Samuel, born about 1719, in company with his son, John, came to Norwich in 1765. They cleared an island in the Connecticut River, opposite the present residency of John W. Loveland, and planted it with corn. In the fall of that year they returned to Connecticut, and in company with a younger son, Samuel, returned in the spring of 1766, and made a permanent settlement. The elder Samuel spent the remainder of his life in the town, and died February 8, 1809. His wife was Jemina Dunham; she died January 12, 1798. Besides the two sons named above, he had three daughters: Sarah, married Francis Smalley; Tabitha, married Jonathan Delano; Jerusha, married Nathan Roberts. They all died young,’ soon after marriage. Hutchinson, John, son of Samuel, was born in 1741, in Windham, Connecticut, and married Mary Wilson, who was born in Ashford, Connecticut, in August, 1744. He enlisted in the Continental Army, and died at Philadelphia, June 22, 1778. His widow afterwards married Solomon...

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Biography of Doctor Ira Davis

The son of Moses Davis, Esq., was born at Dracut, Mass., probably about the year 1797 or 1798. He established himself in the practice of medicine at Norwich Plain in 1830 or 1831, and there continued till his death in March, 1873. He was in constant practice of his profession for more than thirty years.

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Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next with 1,605 and 1,542 respectively. Exceptional causes made the little town of Guilford (now numbering scarcely more than one thousand inhabitants), till after the year 1800, the most populous town in the state. In Norwich, the great falling off in the size of families in recent years is seen in the fact, that in the year 1800, the number of children of school age was 604, out of a total population of 1,486, while in 1880 with a nearly equal population (1,471) it was but 390. In the removal of large numbers of the native-born inhabitants by emigration, we must find the principal cause of the decline of our rural population. Preeminently is this true of Norwich. The outflow of people began very early and now for more than...

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Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected to conform to a recommendation made to the towns in Cumberland and Gloucester Counties by the Convention at Westminster which declared the independence of Vermont the preceding January. 1Governor and Council, Vol. I, p. 47. It is pretty certain that a company of militia was organized in Norwich as early as the year 1774 or 1775. Of this company Peter Olcott was chosen Captain and Thomas Murdock, Ensign, doubtless by the votes of the men enrolled in the same. The company was probably a purely voluntary organization of patriotic young men, in Colonel Seth Warner‘s regiment of Rangers in 1775, in the continental service. Colonel Timothy Bedell, of Haverhill, N. H., also raised a regiment the same year for service in Canada. Fresh regiments were enlisted early in the...

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Biography of Clarence S. Crary

Mr. Clarence S. Crary is not only a banker, but has in the comparatively few years of his business career, earned the title of “Builder of Banks.” Mr. Crary is the Cashier of the Bank of Burlingame, and resides in Burlingame, where he is prominently identified with the business and social life of that city, being the Treasurer of the Burlingame Commercial Club and the Treasurer of the Merchants’ Association of San Mateo and Burlingame. He is also a member of the San Mateo lodge of Elks, and a member of the Delta Tau Delta Fraternity at Stanford University, where he graduated with the class of 1903. Mr. Crary was born in Boone, Iowa March 30, 1879 and attended preparatory school at Grinnell, Iowa, where he went to Grinnell College prior to entering Stanford University, California. Upon graduation, he accepted a position with the St. Francis Hotel as Assistant Clerk. Shortly before the San Francisco fire he left the hotel to enter the real estate business where he was associated with Bovee Toy & Co., San Francisco. His first step in the banking business came after this. From 1906 to 1908 he was cashier of the Mayfield bank. From there he went to the Merchants National Bank of San Francisco where he remained a year in the capacity of Assistant Cashier of their Fillmore Street Branch, and was promoted...

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