Surname: Craig

Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

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Hussey and Morgan Families of New Bedford MA

HUSSEY-MORGAN (New Bedford families). These families, while not among those early here, are of approximately a hundred years’ standing in this community, and with their allied connections are among the very respectable and wealthy families of the locality, the heads of two of these families here considered being the late George Hussey and Charles Wain Morgan, who were extensively engaged in whaling and shipping interests here in New Bedford through much of the first half of the nineteenth century. Here follows in detail arranged chronologically from the first American ancestor the Hussey genealogy, together with that of some of its allied connections, et cetera. Christopher Hussey, baptized 18th of 2d month, 1599, at Dorking, County of Surrey, England, son of John and Mary (Wood) of that place, and for a time in Holland, married Theodate, daughter of Stephen Batchelder, and came from London to New England in the same vessel with Mr. Batchelder, arriving at Boston in the “William and Francis,” in 1632. He probably remained at Lynn, where his father-in-law was sometime minister, until 1636, then went to Newbury and there resided a year or two. He was deputy in 1637, was one of the original settlers of Hampton in 1638, at which time his mother was there with him, and was active and prominent in citizenship for many years; was town clerk in 1650; selectman in 1650-58-64-68;...

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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – C Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. C Surnames CABLE BROS., Arthur L. Benn D., Monmouth R6 Floyd Sec18-30 O160a (1860) Mutual Tel. Monmouth CABLE, Charles H. (Phebe Jane Baldwin) Ch *Florence M., *Newton B.; Monmouth R6 Floyd Sec29 O60a (1860) Mutual Tel. Berwick CABLE, Frank E. (Irene Sheldon) Ch Ruth, *H Sheldon; Berwick R1 Berwick Sec8-17 O400a (1862) Private Tel. Berwick CABLE, Hiram Sheldon (Eunice Ralston)Ch Martha; Berwick R1 Berwick Sec8 T76a Mrs. Irene Cable (1893)...

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Genealogies of the First Settlers of Passaic Valley

Passaic Valley in New Jersey was first settled in the early 1700’s, primarily by families from Long Island, New York and Connecticut. The Family records, or, Genealogies of the first settlers of Passaic Valley and vicinity above Chatham provides genealogies of these early settlers from family records when they could be obtained, otherwise the author used family members to provide the information. Since some of the information comes from memory of individuals, one should validate what is written before relying on it to greatly.

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Washington Settlers from Oregon

William Craig was born in Greenbriar County, Virginia, in 1810. He entered the service of the American Fur Company in 1830, and for ten years led the life of a trapper. When the fur companies broke up, about 1810, he came to Oregon, and settled not long after at Lapwai, near Spalding’s mission, to which he rendered valuable assistance in controlling the Indians. He also was of much service to Gov. Stevens in making treaties with the Indians of eastern Washington. Stevens appointed him on his staff, with the rank of Lieutenant colonel, and he was afterward appointed Indian agent at Lapwai, for’ which position he was well fitted, and which he held for a long time. ‘But for his liberality he would have been rich, but he has given away enough to make several fortunes.’ Walla Walla Union, Oct. 23, 1869. ‘He was the comrade in the mountains of Kit Carson, J. L. Meek, Robert Newell, Courtenay Walker, Thompson, Rahboin, and a host of other brave men whose names are linked with the history of the country.’ Walla Walla Statesman, in Portland Oregonian, Oct. 30, 1869. Here are a few men who settled in Washington at an early period, but who had first resided in Oregon: Solomon Strong, born in Erie co., N. V., Nov. 11, 1817. At the age of fourteen years removed to Ohio, thence to...

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Idaho, the Gem of the Mountains, Origin of the Name

The Mountains have ever been the bulwarks of freedom. Valor is born there; virtue is cherished there, and these are the seeds of song and story. No land ever yet had a literature to endure that had not these for its theme, these off-springs of the pure, sweet atmosphere and sublime splendor of inspiring Mountains; and the more glorious the Mountains, the more glorious the song and story. What then may we not prophesy for Idaho when her torn and devastated placer fields all are terraced vineyards, as in Savoy, and the peace and rest of the old pastoral days of Greece shall possess her? Meanwhile it remains for us to dwell rather upon the vital present; to note the assurances offered in the fair new state of Idaho as this wonderful nineteenth century draws rapidly to its close. Here nature has been lavish to prodigality; here mountain and valley yield forth their treasures; and here are the homes of a progressive, enlightened and a loyal people who honor and receive honor from the whole noble sisterhood of states. The Gem of the Mountains may well challenge admiration, and it is hoped that the pages of this work may bear their part in perpetuating the dramatic story of the brave men and virtuous women who gathered about the cradle of the infant Idaho, and also tell the latter-day story...

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Biography of Victor Craig

Victor Craig, of England, came to America in 1760, and settled in Maryland. He had four sons, William, James, Robert, and Samuel. William and James lived in Albemarle County Va. Samuel was drowned in the Susquehanna River. Robert was a soldier of the revolutionary war. He was married first to Susan Carter, of Virginia, who was afterward killed by the Indians. She lived nine days after having been scalped. Mr. Craig was married the second time to Sarah Ellington, of New Jersey, by whom he had-John, David, Victor, Jonathan, Jacob, Cynthia, Nancy, and Sally. Mr. Craig settled in Montgomery County in 1829, and died the following year. His eldest son, John, married Nancy Cobb, and settled in Montgomery County in 1826. He was a blacksmith by trade, and the first one at Danville. In 1831 he built the Dryden horse-mill, on the Booneslick road, below Danville. The mill was run by a cog wheel, and it required three or four hours to grind a bushel of grain. The hermit, Baughman, whose history is given elsewhere, carried the stones of this mill to his cave, many years after the mill ceased running, and arranged them so he could do his own grinding, by hand. He still uses the same stones. Col. David Craig, brother of John, settled in Montgomery County in 1817, and is still living, in his 87th year....

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Biographical Sketch of A. H. Craig

(See Ghigau and Conrad) Nancy Jane, daughter of Daniel and Annie (Ballard) Ratliff, born February 21, 1874. Married September 3, 1891 Amon Hale Craig, born February 15, 1858 in Jackson County, Tennessee. They are the parents of Ada Starr, born August 15, 1893 ; Amon Hale, born June 6, 1896; Clifford Cravens, born August 2, 1898, and Warren Reed Craig, born October 22,...

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Biographical Sketch of William S. Craig

William S. Craig, farmer, Section 13, P. O. Craig, is a native of Harrison County, Ohio; was there engaged in farming; in 1870, came to Nebraska; located on this farm. He owns about 1,800 acres of land and donated the land where the station and town of Craig are now being built. Mainly through his exertions the station was located here. He has under fence about 450 acres, which are largely used for pasture. His attention has been largely directed to raising sheep. Lately the number has been largely reduced. He now owns about 500. Is Treasurer of the Presbyterian Church, Treasurer of the School Board, Justice of the Peace, and other...

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Biography of Adna C. Craig

ADNA C. CRAIG. Deceased. – Among the prominent citizens of Union county stands the gentleman whose name initiates this paragraph, and we are constrained because of his real merit and worth, and because of his activities in advancing the welfare of this county, to grant him this memoir in the history of the county where he wrought so faithfully. In pioneer life he was a leader in many sections, and the rugged life of the frontiersman was his to pass through for many years, and his vigor and energy led the way into many scenes where others would only follow. Intimately acquainted with every phase of the existence of those who opened the country for their fellows to follow. Mr. Craig always manifested that same steady nerve in danger, fortitude and endurance in hardships, and ability and keen foresight in the business world. Our subject was born in Ohio, on October 14, 1821, being the son of James and Margaret Craig. He early learned the brick mason’s trade, and wrought at the same until the memorable year of 1849, when he joined the exodus for the golden west, and landing in Redbluff, California, after a weary journey across the plains, he at once set to mining. As early as 1861, he was in the Florence and Oro Fino camps, being among the very first ones to step foot on...

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Craig, Marcia Lareen Parker Mrs. – Obituary

North Powder, Union County, Oregon Marcia Lareen Parker Craig, 69, died Dec. 12, 2005, at Boise from complications of a long, hard-fought and painful battle with throat and mouth cancer. At her request, there will be no funeral. A memorial service and celebration of her life will take place March 18 at the First Presbyterian Church in Baker City, with a reception following at the church, 1995 Fourth St. Services are under the direction of Gray’s West & Co. Mrs. Craig was born March 20, 1936, at Baker City to Gifford Henry and Elfleda Midde Maxwell Parker. She grew up on her parents’ ranch at North Powder, where she attended school grades 1 through 12, graduating from North Powder High School in 1954. She was active as a cheerleader, and she played drums in the high school band. On Aug. 1, 1954, she married Alfred L. “Larry” Craig of North Powder. Most of their married life was spent in Alaska, where she pursued a career in public finance, becoming the finance director for the city of Kodiak, and later for the city of Palmer, excelling at both positions. She also served as a member of the Kodiak City Council. Mrs. Craig enjoyed gardening, reading, traveling and creating lovely cross-stitched pieces for her friends and family. She was a loving, generous wife, best friend, mother and grandmother. Her leaving has...

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Craig, Edwin L. – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon 1923-2007 Edwin Leonard Craig, 83, of La Grande, died March 9 at his home. A funeral service will be held at 1 p.m. Tuesday at Loveland Funeral Chapel. Mr. Craig was born May 13, 1923, to Leonard Clinton and Marguerite Elizabeth (Kinsloe) Craig in Hutchinson, Kan. He was raised in Twin Falls, Idaho, and graduated from high school in Rock Springs, Wyo. He married Norma Bluhm Aug. 7, 1942, and served in the Army during World War II. Norma died while he was stationed in France. On April 14, 1946, Mr. Craig married Sylva Fay Gilson in Rupert, Idaho. In 1954 they moved to La Grande, where he operated Craig’s Cleaners until he retired in 1986. Mr. Craig was an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He enjoyed boating and waterskiing with his family and was an avid golfer. Survivors include his wife, Sylva Fay Craig of La Grande; sons and daughters-in-law, Edwin B. and Lesta Craig of Montclair, Calif., John L. and Jody Craig of La Grande, Thomas A. and Teri Craig of Eastside, Steve A. and Rhonda Craig of Albany and Bruce D. Craig of Salem; and nine grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the LDS church library or a charity of choice in care of Loveland Funeral Chapel, 1508 Fourth St.,...

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Herbert Bingham Craig

1st Lt. 123rd Inf., Co. I, 31st Div. Born in Alamance County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Craig. Entered the service May 15, 1917, at Mebane, N.C. Was sent to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., and from there to Camp Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Camp Wheeler, Ga. Sailed for France Oct. 9, 1918. Commissioned as 2nd Lt. Aug. 15, 1917, and as 1st Lt. Oct. 1, 1917. Returned to USA Oct. 28, 1919. Served as commanding officer of P. W. E. 245 while in France. Mustered out at Camp Dix, N. J., Oct. 31,...

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Alfred Carr Craig

Sergt. Was born in Gaston County, N.C., Nov. 7, 1892, his family being one of the oldest in the Piedmont section of the Carolinas. Several of his lineal ancestors participated in the American cause during the Revolutionary War. Henry Craig was wounded in a skirmish with the British in South Carolina during the summer of 1781 and was confined to his bed at the time of the battle of Kings Mountain. His grandfather, Patrick Craig, was a captain in the Confederate army, commanding Co. B, 1st Regiment of South Carolina Volunteers. Alfred Craig entered the service of the USA at Camp Jackson, S. C., June 25, 1918; was assigned to the 16th Co., 4th Tr. Bn., 156th Depot Brig.; was assigned the first day after arriving to the Company mess as a cook. After cooking for about thirty days was given charge of the Company mess. On Sept. 25, 1918, was transferred in advance of his company to Camp Sevier, S. C., to prepare Company mess quarters. He remained with the 156th Depot Brig., at Camp Sevier until Jan. 4, 1919, when the Brigade was transferred back to Camp Jackson, S. C., where the Brigade was discharged the 30th, division and casual units. Here Craig received his warrant as Sergt., 1st class, March 1, 1919, and was discharged April 25, 1919, being the only man in the outfit at...

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