Surname: Cortelyou

Biography of Luther Cortelyou

Luther Cortelyou was for many years one of the prominent grain merchants of Kansas, and in later years had given his chief attention to the management of the Farmers State Bank of Muscotah, of which he is president. Mr. Cortelyou had resided in Muscotah for nearly thirty years. His family is a prominent one in Atchison County, and his son Peter J. is now postmaster of Muscotah. Mr. Cortelyou was born in Somerset County, New Jersey, December 23, 1851, and is descended from some of the original stock of the Jersey Coast. His ancestors were both Dutch and French. In 1701 a Dutch company from Long Island bought a tract of 10,000 acres in Franklin Township, Somerset County. Among the men in the enterprise were Peter Cortelyou and Jacques Cortelyou. In those early days the name was sometimes spelled Cortilleau. Jacques Cortelyou had arrived in New Amsterdam about 1651 as private tutor to the children of a prominent Dutch family, Van Werkhoven. Jacques Cortelyou married Neltje Van Duyn, and both were of French extraction. Among their children was Jacques h. Hendrick, son of the second Jacques, was born April 11, 1711, and settled on lands owned by his father adjoining the tract of 10,000 acres bought by Peter Cortalyou and others. Hendrick married, August 3, 1731, Antie Coeste Van Voorhees. Their son Hendriek married Sarah Scothoff. Hendrick, third, born...

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Biographical Sketch of Peter J. Cortelyou

Peter J. Cortelyou, third son of Luther Cortelyou, was born on a farm in Talbott County, Maryland, June 25, 1885, and was four years of age when his parents removed to Muscotah, Kansas. He attended the public schools there, graduated from the Atchison County High School in 1904, and then for several years was associated with his father in the grain business. During 1910-12 he owned and edited the Muscotah Record. In November, 1913, he was appointed postmaster of Muscotah, under President Wilson, and had filled that office to the present date. On July 1, 1916, Mr. P. J. Cortelyou again bought the Muscotah Record, and is editor and proprietor. This paper was established in 1884, and had an influential circulation throughout Atchison and adjoining counties. It is conducted independent in politics, and is a weekly paper. The plant and offices are situated on Kansas Avenue. P. J. Cortelyou, who is unmarried, is affiliated with Muscotah Lodge No. 116, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and in politics is a...

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Biography of John V. Cortelyou

John V. Cortelyou, who took the chair of German at the Kansas State Agricultural College in 1904, was at that time only recently returned from Germany. Professor Cortelyou holds his Doctor of Philosophy degree from Heidelberg University, though he is an American by birth and training, and represents a long and interesting lineage of some of the old Dutch families of New Jersey. He was born on a farm near Harlingen in Somerset County, New Jersey, September 19, 1874. He is a son of John G. and Mary (Van Zandt) Cortelyou, both natives of New Jersey and in both lines descended from old families of this country. The paternal ancestry goes back to Jaques Cortelyou, who was a native of Utrecht, Holland, and of both French and Dutch lineage. The name Cortelyou is French. Jaques Cortelyou who came to America in 1652 settled at New Amsterdam, now New York City. His descendants afterwards became numerous in the states of New York, New Jersey and also on Long Island, and they are now represented in many parts of the Union. Professor Cortelyou is in the tenth generation from the original Jaques. Jaques had a son, Jaques Jr.; the heads of the next four successive generations bore the given name Hendrick. Then came an Abraham Cortelyou, and following him James G. Cortelyou, grandfather of Professor Cortelyou. James G. Cortelyou married Cornelia...

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