Surname: Cooper

Slave Narrative of Uncle Dave White

Interviewer: Samuel Addison Person Interviewed: Dave White Location: Congaree, South Carolina Date of Birth: (about) 1842 Age: 91 There Was No God But Mossa An’ Missus “My pa name was Nat White who tell me dat I was bo’n about 1842. My ma was name Jane White. My pa use to carry all de votes from McClellanville to Charleston. He come from Tibbin, South Carolina. He also been all ’round de United States. My Ma’s Ma bin name Kate. I had sense to know ’em all. “I know a heap o’ sojus had on nice buttons an’ had plumes in dere hats. Dey wus singin’ an’ playin’ on a flute dis song, ‘I wish I wus in Dixie,’ an’ dey went in de big house an’ broke up ebery thing. Dey say to me, ‘you are as free as a frog,’ an’ dey say to my pa, ‘all your chillun are free.’ Dey say ‘little niggers is free as a frog’ an’ we holler much. “I aint nebber do no work, but I kin ‘member I use to wear a pant you call chambery. Ma cook a pot o’ peas an’ weevils wus always on de top. Ma would den turn mush an’ clean a place on de floor, she make a paddle an’ we eat off de floor. She use to bake ash cake too. I didn’ know...

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Slave Narrative of Manda Walker

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Manda Walker Location: Winnsboro, South Carolina Age: 80 Manda Walker lives with her son-in-law, Albert Cooper, in a three-room frame cottage in Winnsboro, S.C. Albert’s first wife was her daughter, Sallie. Five of their children and Albert’s second wife, Sadie, occupy the house with Albert and Manda. “Does you know where Horse Crick (Creek) branch is, and where Wateree Crick is? Ever been ‘long de public road ‘tween them water courses? Well, on de sunrise side of dat road, up on a hill, was where my slavery time marster live. “I was born in de yard, back of de white folks’ house, in a little log house wid a dirt floor and a stick and mud chimney to one end of de house. My marster was name Marse Tom Rowe and my mistress name Missy Jane Rowe. They de ones dat tell me, long time ago, dat I was born befo’ de war, in 1857. Deir chillun was Miss Mary and Miss Miami. “I no work much ’til de end of de war. Then I pick cotton and peas and shell corn and peas. Most of de time I play and sometime be maid to my young misses. Both growed into pretty buxom ladies. Miss Miami was a handsome buxom woman; her marry Marse Tom Johnson and live, after de war, near Wateree...

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Slave Narrative of Morgan Scurry

Interviewer: G. Leland Summer Person Interviewed: Morgan Scurry Date of Interview: May 19, 1937 Location: Newberry, South Carolina Place of Birth: Newberry County SC “I was born in Newberry County, near the Laurens County line, above Chappells Depot. My father and mother were Tom and Francis Scurry and belonged as slaves to the Drury Scurry family. Dr. Drury Scurry bought them from Col. Cooper of Laurens County. He was a fine man and mighty good to his slaves. I worked around the house as a boy, and in the fields when I got old enough. Some of the nigger boys hunted ‘possums, rabbits and squirrels. Dr. Scurry had 100 acres in woods. They were just full of squirrels and we killed more squirrels than you can count. “The slaves didn’t have a garden, but after the war, we stayed on wid Marse Scurry. When freedom come, he come to us in the yard where we had congregated and told us we was free and could go anywhere we wanted, but if any wanted to stay on wid him, he would pay wages. All of us stayed on wid him. He give us a one-acre patch of ground to raise anything we wanted to raise. He had white overseers during slavery, but none ever whipped us ’cause the master wouldn’t let them. He had a plantation of about 300 acres...

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Slave Narrative of Sarah Harris

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Sarah Harris Date of Interview: May 19, 1937 Location: North Carolina Date of Birth: April 1861 Interviewed May 19, 1937. Sarah Harris is my name. I wuz borned April 1861, on the plantation of Master John William Walton. My father wuz name Frank Walton and my mother wuz name Flora Walton. My brothers wuz name Lang and Johnny. My sisters: Hannah, Mary, Ellen, Violet and Annie. My grandmother wuz name Ellen Walton. She wuz 104 years old when she died. My mother wuz 103 years old when she died; she has been dead 3 years. She died in October, 3 years this pas’ October. I ‘member seeing the Yankees. I wuz not afraid of ’em, I thought dey were the prettiest blue mens I had ever seed. I can see how de chickens and guineas flew and run from ’em. De Yankees killed ’em and give part of ’em to the colored folks. Most of de white folks had run off and hid. I can’t read and write. I nebber had no chance. De Yankees had their camps along the Fayetteville road. Dey called us Dinah, Sam, and other names. Dey later had de place dey call de bureau. When we left de white folks we had nothing to eat. De niggers wait there at de bureau and they give ’em hard tack,...

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Slave Narrative of Sarah Harris

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Sarah Harris Date of Interview: May 19, 1937 Location: North Carolina Date of Birth: April 1861 Age: 76 Sarah Harris is my name. I wuz borned April 1861, on the plantation of Master John William Walton. My father wuz name Frank Walton and my mother wuz name Flora Walton. My brothers wuz name Lang and Johnny. My sisters: Hannah, Mary, Ellen, Violet and Annie. My grandmother wuz name Ellen Walton. She wuz 104 years old when she died. My mother wuz 103 years old when she died; she has been dead 3 years. She died in October, 3 years this pas’ October. I ‘member seeing the Yankees. I wuz not afraid of ’em, I thought dey were the prettiest blue mens I had ever seed. I can see how de chickens and guineas flew and run from ’em. De Yankees killed ’em and give part of ’em to the colored folks. Most of de white folks had run off and hid. I can’t read and write. I nebber had no chance. De Yankees had their camps along the Fayetteville road. Dey called us Dinah, Sam, and other names. Dey later had de place dey call de bureau. When we left de white folks we had nothing to eat. De niggers wait there at de bureau and they give ’em hard tack, white potatoes,...

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Biography of James Cooper

One of the leading manufacturers in the Dominion a self made man in the fullest sense of the term a man of the people, and one held in the highest esteem by those who know him; is the subject of this sketch, senior member of the firm of Messrs. Cooper and Smith, wholesale boot and shoe manufacturers. Mr. Cooper is a native of Gainsboro, Lincolnshire, England, where he was born in 182S, the thirteenth of a family of fifteen children of whom twelve are still living. He received but a limited education, such as was attainable forty years ago in the mother country, by children of people in ordinary circumstances, and at an early age was apprenticed to learn the shoemaking trade. Not satisfied with home prospects, he, in 1847, immigrated to Canada, and is the only one of the family who ever crossed the Atlantic with the single exception of a younger brother who came on a visit a few years ago. When he landed in this country his worldly possessions were only sufficient to meet his immediate wants, but he was endowed with a wonderful amount of energy, courage, and perseverance, and these traits of character, added to his knowledge of the shoemaking business, laid the foundation of his success as one of the foremost business men of Canada. After working for a short time in Quebec...

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Biographical Sketch of Elijah Cooper

Elijah Cooper, who came to Hinsdale at an early day, married Sarah Sanger, April 4, 1777, and reared four children, as follows: Lucy, born November 5, 1777; Elijah, born November 26, 1782; Mary, born April g, 1785; Arad, born April 10, 1787; and Pearly, the date of whose birth we are unable to give. Mr. Cooper settled as a farmer upon the place Daniel Smith now occupies, where he reared his family, and finally died at the residence of his son Arad. Of the children, Lucy died unmarried; Mary married a Mr. Stearns, and went west; Elijah married and also moved west; Pearly died unmarried; and Arad married Hannah Fisher and spent his life in the town. He located first in the village, where he worked as a shoemaker, but soon engaged in farming on the homestead, where he remained about twenty years. He then sold the farm and purchased the place known as Cooper’s Point, the former residence of Lieutenant Cooper, a cousin of his father, where he resided over twenty years, and finally bought the place where his daughter, Mrs. Sarah A. Elmore, now resides, on Pleasant street, and known as the Congregational parsonage. Here he died, May 6, 1856, aged sixty-nine years. The only living representatives of this family now residing in the town are Mrs. Sarah A. Elmore, Charles E. Cooper and Arad Cooper, with...

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Biography of J. O. Cooper, M.D.

Dr. J. O. Cooper, engaged In the practice of medicine in Jefferson City, was born March 19, 1884, at Cooper Hill, Osage county, Missouri, the place of his birth having been named in honor of the family of which he is a representative. His parents, Thomas McCuin and Martha Jane (Cox) Cooper, were also natives of Missouri, the former born in Gasconade county and the latter near Cooper Hill in Osage county. Thomas M. Cooper was a farmer throughout his active life and was also prominent in public affairs. He served as notary public for thirty years and was deputy sheriff in Gasconade county and also collector in that county. He filled the office of postmaster at Useful, Missouri, and during the Civil war enlisted from Gasconade county on the Union side. becoming first sergeant of Company I, Ninth Missouri Regiment. He was captured by Price at Mount Sterling, Missouri, and afterward taken to Jefferson City, where be was released. His life was indeed a busy, active and useful one and he passed away June 27, 1918. Dr. Cooper, having completed a high school course in Osage county, became a student in the Barnes University of St. Louis, where he pursued his medical study, winning his professional degree upon graduation with the class of 1907. He at once entered upon general practice in Osage county and a little later...

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Biography of W. J. Cooper

W. J. COOPER. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is well known throughout the section in which he resides as a man of unblemished reputation, whose energy, perseverance and integrity have placed him in an independent financial position and has won for him the respect of his fellow-citizens. The fine farm on which he resides comprises 178 acres of land, but he is also the owner of real estate in other parts of the county which amounts to some 500 acres. He has ever been an enterprising, thorough and practical farmer, and his valuable property is looked after in a manner that would at once indicate his thorough knowledge of his calling. In connection with his farming operations he is the owner of a fine steam grist mill and cotton gin, both of which have proven very successful, and as he is located about eleven miles from Marshall, his mills are largely patronized. He is a product of the county in which he is now living, his birth occurring May 18, 1854, therefore it is not to be greatly wondered at that he has every interest of the county warmly at heart and at all times manifests much public spirit. His parents, Newton and Sadie (Thornton) Cooper, were born on Tennessee soil and were there reared and married, their removal to Arkansas taking place in October, 1853. They...

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Cooper, Harry W. Rev. – Obituary

Rev. Harry W. Cooper Dies of Influenza Rev. Harry W. Cooper, pastor of the Church of God, passed away yesterday at five o’clock from the effects of the dread disease that is taking so many lives in all parts of the world. The deceased was born in Butler County, Kansas and was thirty-two years old. He leaves a wife and three children, and parents who live at Moscow, Idaho. His father was at the bedside of his son. Rev. Cooper had been sick about ten days and was thought to be improving but the disease had weakened his heart and he passed away very suddenly yesterday morning. He came to this city from Idaho to take charge of the Church of God and has built up the church and was universally liked. The funeral services were held at the grave in the Enterprise cemetery this morning at 10 o’clock. Wallowa County Reporter, Wallowa County, Oregon, Thursday January 2,...

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Cooper, Edith L. – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Services for Edith L. Cooper, 82, of Newberg, were held Wednesday, Nov. 10, at 1 p.m. at Macy and Son Funeral Chapel in McMinnville. Interment will follow at the Enterprise Cemetery. She died Nov. 6, 1993, at the Chehalem Care Center in Newburg. She was born June 17, 1911, in Lostine, the daughter of Martin Luther and Hattie Jane (Biggs) Greenough. On July 8, 1929, she married William H. Cooper in Enterprise. Mrs. Cooper was raised and school in Lostine. She helped raise her brother and sisters and then lived on her uncle’s farm and helped him farm. In 1961 she moved to Newberg and in the late 70s she moved back to Lostine until 1984 when she moved back to Newberg. She loved to play cards. Survivors include five sons, William Jr., Ramon, Darrell, Gary and Steven Cooper, all from Newberg; three daughters, Carol Jane Prine, White Salmon, Wash., Lois A., Trent, Puyallup, Wash., and Susan Perez, McMinnville; one sister, Louise Gettling, Klamath Falls; 27 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by a son; Wesley Cooper, two brothers, one sister and three grandchildren. Wallowa County Chieftain, Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon, Thursday November 11, 1993 Page...

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Biography of John T. Cooper

Checotah numbers among her representative citizens John T. Cooper, attorney at law with offices in the Peoples National Bank building. He is a southerner by birth, born in Scottsboro, Jackson county, Alabama, on the 7th of August, 1881, a son of Abe and Julia (Anderson) Cooper, both natives of that state. The father engaged in agriculture in Alabama until 1894, in which year he removed to Indian Territory and located at Sallisaw. He engaged in farming there for three years and subsequently came to McIntosh County. He became one of the prominent and successful agriculturists of this community. He is now living retired, enjoying well earned rest, at the age of seventy years. Mrs. Cooper died in 1897. John T. Cooper received his early education in the public schools of Alabama, removing to Indian Territory with his parents at the age of eleven years. He completed his preliminary education in the public schools of Sallisaw and later entered Harrell Institute, now the Spaulding Institute, at Muskogee. In due time he was graduated from that school and for the next eight years was engaged in educational work. During that time he studied law by correspondence and he was admitted to the bar in 1915, in which year be came to Checotah, where he has since practiced. For more than six years he has had offices in the Peoples National Bank...

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Biography of James T. Cooper

James T. Cooper, a lawyer, banker and widely known citizen of Fredonia, was born in Woodson, but then Wilson, County, Kansas, August 30, 1866, and represents a family that came to Kansas while it was a territory. The ancestry of Mr. Cooper is particularly interesting. He is descended from that Sir Ashley Cooper, the Earl of Shaftsbury, who founded a colony on the Ashley River in North Carolina, and from that settlement the family name had become widely dispersed. It may be of interest to recall the fact that the noted John Locke, the great English philosopher, prepared a model charter or constitution for the government of Sir Ashley’s colony, and while the rules exemplified a beautiful theory, they did not prove entirely practical or successful in handling the administration of the colony. Later ancestors of the Kansas lawyer were his great-grandfather, Vinson Cooper, who was born in North Carolina in 1769; and the grandfather, David C. Cooper, who was born in Tennessee in 1806. Albert J. Cooper, father of James T., was born in Montgomery County, Tennessee, in 1824, and when ten years of age removed with his parents to Bates County, Missouri, where he grew up and where he married. He took up farming, and in 1857 he joined some of the early settlers in Kansas, locating on the Verdigris River in Woodson County. He homesteaded a...

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James Crawford Cooper

2nd Lt., Inf., Marines, 74th Co., 2nd Div., 6th Regt.; of Vance County; son of C. J. and Mrs. M. A. F. Cooper. Husband of Mrs. Lucy Parham Cooper. Entered service April 11, 1917, at Henderson, N.C. Sent to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. Transferred to Hoboken, N. Y. Sailed for France Sept. 15, 1917. Fought at Verdun Front, two months, March to June, 1918. Chateau Thierry June and July, 1917. Gassed at Verdun. Instructor Inf. Tactics 61st Brigade, Camp Wheeler, Ga. Instructor 20th Div., 48th Inf. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., Jan. 13,...

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Seth Todd

Seth Todd4, (Eleazer3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Feb. 16, 1738-39, died Dec. 3, 1803, married Mary Ives, who was born 1744, died April 14, 1819. Children: 233. Ira, b. Jan. 29, 1766. *234. Mary, b. Dec. 13, 1767. 235. Sarah, b. July 17, 1769, m. James Cooper. 236. Mabel, b. Sept. 13, 1771. *237. Eleazer, b. 1774. *238. Bede, b. Dec. 2, 1779, m. Eli Todd, who was a descendant of Samuel. For children see No. 303. *239. Linus, b. Mar. 3,...

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