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Surname: Cooke

Ancestry of the Embert Howard Family of Brockton Massachusetts

EMBERT HOWARD, long one of the most successful business men of Brockton, of which city he is also one of the foremost citizens, is a worthy representative of a family which has historic identity with the earliest settling of New England. For two hundred and sixty and more years the family bearing this name has dwelt in the Bridgewaters and in the region of country thereabouts, the posterity of John Haward, who was one of the early settlers of Duxbury, Mass. The genealogy following traces the line in chronological order from this immigrant ancestor.

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Ancestry of Herbert Isam Mitchell of Brockton, MA

The family bearing the name of Mitchell is one of the oldest in the New World, its progenitor being Experience Mitchell, who came over in 1623 in the “Ann,” and from that time to the present the records of various towns of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, chiefly Plymouth, Duxbury and the Bridgewaters, bear mute testimony of the prominence in peace and war of the members of the family in the different generations, and the present head of the family in Brockton, Isam Mitchell, president of Isam Mitchell & Co., lumber dealers and contractors, and his son, the late Herbert Isam Mitchell, active in business with his father and prominent in fraternal circles, have proved themselves firm in purpose and able in business.

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The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

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Thompson Family of Brockton, MA

Albert Cranston Thompson, a resident of Brockton, Plymouth county, for over forty years, was a citizen of proved worth in business and public life. His influence in both is a permanent factor in the city’s development, a force which dominates the policy of at least one phase of its civil administration, and his memory is cherished by the many with whom he had long sustained commercial and social relations. As the head of an important industrial concern for a period of over thirty years, as chairman for nearly ten years, up to the time of his death, of the sewerage commissioners of Brockton, as president of the Commercial Club, as an active worker in church and social organizations, he had a diversity of interests which brought him into contact with all sorts and conditions of men and broadened his life to an unusual degree. Good will and sympathy characterized his intercourse with all his fellows. As may be judged from his numerous interests and his activity in all he was a man of many accomplishments, of unusual ability, of attractive personality and un-questionable integrity. He was earnest in everything which commanded his attention and zealous in promoting the welfare of any object which appealed to him, and his executive ability and untiring energy made him an ideal worker in the different organizations of every kind with which he was connected. Mr. Thompson was a native of the county in which he passed all his life, having been born Dec. 19, 1843, in Halifax, a descendant of one of the oldest and best known families of that town. The families of Thompson and Fuller were very numerous and prominent in that region, so much so that according to tradition a public speaker once, in opening his address, instead of beginning with the customary “Ladies and Gentlemen” said “Fullers and Thompsons.” So much for their numbers. The line of descent is traced back to early Colonial days.

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Ancestors of Mereitt G. Perkins of Bridgewater, MA

The Perkins family is one of long and honorable standing in America, being one of the oldest in New England, where it is first found of record in Hampton – then in Massachusetts, now in New Hampshire. This family has numbered among its members men who have been prominent in the learned professions as well as in the business and financial circles of this country. This article is to particularly treat of that branch of the family through which descended the late John Perkins, of Bridgewater, of which town his ancestors were early settlers, and where he was actively identified with the iron manufacturing industry for a number of years. The ancestral line of this branch of the family is here given in chronological order from the first American settler, Abraham Perkins. Through his grandmother, Huldah Ames Hayward, who became the wife of Asa Perkins, Mr. Perkins is also descended from another of the oldest and best known families of Massachusetts. The progenitor of this family, Thomas Hayward, came from England to New England, becoming one of the early settlers of Duxbury before 1638. In the early part of the eighteenth century many of the Haywards changed their name to Howard, the two names in all probability having been the same originally, as both have the same Norse origin. Among the distinguished descendants of this Hayward or Howard family may be mentioned William Howard Taft, president of the United States. The branch of the family through which Mr. Perkins descends is herewith given, in chronological order.

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Harris Family Genealogy of East Bridgewater Massachusetts

The Harris family here briefly considered — that of some of the descendants of the late Deacon and Hon. William Harris, of East Bridgewater, who for a quarter of a century was town clerk, for several years town treasurer, and a representative in the Massachusetts General Court — is one of the ancient and honorable families of the Bridgewaters. Deacon Harris’s son, the late Hon. Benjamin Winslow Harris, lawyer, statesman and judge through nearly sixty years, had a long, useful and honored public career; and his son, Hon. Robert Orr Harris, has for thirty years held a high place...

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Ancestors of Warren A. Reed of Brockton Massachusetts

The Reed family of Brockton, Mass., a leading member of which was Judge Warren A. Reed, lawyer and jurist, who for over a third of a century had been one of the foremost citizens of Brockton, and during the greater part of that long period connected with the judicial, civic and financial interests of the city, district and State, is one of long and honorable standing in this Commonwealth, and one the forerunner of which came to these shores over two hundred and fifty years ago. Many members of this historic family have given good account of themselves, and many are there who have been prominent in the history of this country. An account of the branch of the family to which Judge Reed belongs is here given in chronological order, beginning with the earliest American ancestor.

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History of Cayuga County New York

This history of Cayuga County New York published in 1879, provides a look at the first 80 years of existence for this county, with numerous chapters devoted to it’s early history. One value of this manuscript may be found in the etched engravings found throughout of idyllic scenes of Cayuga County including portraits of men, houses, buildings, farms, and scenery. Included are 90 biographies of early settlers, and histories of the individual townships along with lists of men involved in the Union Army during the Civil War on a regiment by regiment basis.

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Cooke, Hazel Dougatry – Obituary

Mrs. Hazel Cooke, wife of Jay Cooke of the Colockum died in Spokane, Tuesday, March 13, at 2 o’clock. Mrs. Cook has been in poor health for sometime and was in Spokane with her mother, Mrs. Margaret Perry in the hopes of benefiting her condition. The body will be brought to Wenatchee Friday. Funeral arrangements will be made later. Hazel died from peritonitis due to an entopic pregnancy. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Cooke, Ellsworth V. – Obituary

Ellsworth V. “E. V.” Cooke, 94, of Grants Pass died Wednesday, June 14, 2006, at Redwood Terrace. A graveside service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at Laurel Cemetery in Cave Junction. Grants Pass Funeral Alternatives is in charge of arrangements. Cooke was born April 8, 1912, in Entiat, Wash., and was raised on a ranch near Entiat. During World War II, he spent time mining copper in Butte, Mont. He moved to the Illinois Valley in 1944 and worked in the logging industry. In the 1970s, he moved to Grants Pass, where he promoted garlic production in the state of Oregon. He was married five times and, though he had no children, he helped raise five families. He was a member of the Eagles and Masonic lodges and the White Shrine. He enjoyed memorizing poems, songs, and stories. Survivors include a sister Gladys Fattig of Eureka, Calif. Contributed by: Shelli...

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Biography of Josiah Cooke

Josiah Cooke, from Coventry, Conn., came to Alstead in 1774. He married Huldah Bassett for his first wife, Lucy Desmond for his second, and reared one son and two daughters. The son, Capt. Josiah, married Sarah Emerson, who bore him three sons and two daughters-John, Arva. Beniah, Polly and Sarah. John married Eunice Parker, rearing one son and one daughter, the latter of whom, Philetta, resides in town. Arva married Rhoda Willard, who bore him five children, three of whom are living. lie was a farmer, served the town as selectman, and died in 1844, aged forty-nine years. His eldest son, Josiah W., resides in Chesterfield. Charles E. has always resided in town, spent his early life on the Cooke homestead, owned and operated a saw and grist-mill (with Wilson D. Holt) eleven years, and in 1869 bought the foundry business of Robb & Kidder, which he still continues. He represented the town in 1863-64, has been selectman six years and has also served as town treasurer. He married for his first wife Luthera Holt, and for his second Maria H., widow of Nelson E. Beckwith, and has three children-Charles H., Oliver A., and Hattie A. (Mrs. S. S. Wilder). Beniah, the youngest son of Capt. Josiah, pursued a collegiate course at Schenectady, N. Y., became a teacher in Fitchburg, Mass., edited a newspaper there a short time, then...

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Biography of Anson S. Cooke, Hon.

Hon. Anson S. Cooke. A resident of Kansas during a period of forty-five years, a pioneer of the prairies of Mitchell County, and for twelve years a member of the State Senate, Hon. Anson S. Cooke is well and favorably known in various parts of the commonwealth, and particularly so at Topeka where he now is living in retirement. During his long and useful career he has risen from poverty to affluence and from obscurity to prominence, and while engaged steadfastly and successfully in the promotion of his personal interests has also contributed to the welfare of the state which has so long been his home. Senator Cooke was born August 13, 1849, in Lake County, Illinois, a son of Daniel G. Cooke. The family is of Quaker stock, with all the sterling characteristics of that creed, and originated in this country in New England, from whence came David Cooke, the grandfather of Anson S. David Cooke was an early settler of Oneida County, New York, arriving there at a time when the country was still new and wild game abundant, the bears being so numerous that it was almost impossible to raise livestock with any degree of success. Senator Cooke says that he has frequently heard his grandfather tell of driving them out of his hog pen. Daniel G. Cooke, father of the senator, was born in 1822,...

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Cooke, Earl Patten – Obituary

Earl P. Cooke, 57, resident of Yakima for the past seven years, died in a Yakima hospital Monday [December 27] evening. He had made his home at 301 N. 26th Ave. Mr. Cooke was born in Ellensburg. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Morand D. Cooke were pioneers of the Ellensburg District. He is survived by his wife, Hazel; one sister, Mrs. Laurin T. Dawes, Ellensburg, and three brothers, Lester V. of Ellensburg, Charlie P. of Ellensburg and Frank M. of Seattle. Mr. Cooke was a member of the Elks. He had previously lived in Menlo, Wash. for 19 years. He was a teacher at the time of his death was instructing veterans in farm training. Yakima Daily Republic, December 28, 1954 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Cooke, Daisy Victoria Storey – Obituary

Mrs. Daisy Victoria Cooke, 78, of 410 S. 49th Ave., died Monday [September 19, 1977] in St. Elizabeth Hospital. Mrs. Cooke was born in Cumberland, Wash. Her parents, George C and Emma Storey, were Washington State pioneers. Mrs. Cooke was educated in Seattle Public Schools. On Sept. 19, 1922 she married Howard P. Cooke in Wenatchee. Today was their 55th wedding anniversary. They moved to Yakima 10 years ago from Port Orchard. She was a lifelong member of the Episcopal Church, served as a musician for many drill and degree teams for fraternal organizations, was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary Post 279, Cooties, Women of the Moose Post 389 in which she hild a friendship degree, Fraternal Order of Eagles Auxiliary 2229 of Toppenish, American Legion Auxiliary Post 36. She also was a member of the National Federation of Grandmothers of America. Survivors are her husband; two sons, Clifford Cooke of Bremerton, and Howard P. Cooke Jr., of Sam Jose, Calif.; one daughter, Mrs. Lewis (Dorothy) Hunt of Phoenix, Ore.; a sister, Mrs. Ray Goodwin of Seattle; nine grandchildren; seven great grandchildren. Yakima Herald Republic, September 20, 1977 Contributed by: Shelli...

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