Surname: Coker

Biography of James M. Coker M.D.

JAMES M. COKER, M. D. He whose name heads this sketch is a successful practicing physician who has no pet theories to demonstrate at the risk of his patients’ lives, and who is prouder of the confidence reposed in him by the numerous first-class families whom he counts among his patrons than he could possibly be of any fame that could come to him through the following of any fancy calculated to move him. He was born in Marion County, Arkansas, April 28, 1853, the second child of William L. and Elizabeth (Hudspeth) Coker, natives of this State, and grandson of William Coker, one of the first settlers of Arkansas from Alabama. He was a farmer as was his son William I., and the latter accumulated a fair competency by tilling the soil as well as by following mercantile pursuits and stockraising. He died in Boone County, Arkansas, in 1871, and his widow in 1892, they having become the parents of four children: John W., the present sheriff of Marion County; J. M.; Margaret, who died after her marriage with Thomas Raidsbeck, and Martha, who is the wife of James Gilley and lives in Texas. Mrs. Coker was a daughter of George Hudspeth, one of the early settlers of Arkansas, and she was an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Coker was a soldier of the...

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Biography of Edward Coker

EDWARD COKER. This gentleman is one of the active stockmen of West Plains, Missouri, and an influential and progressive citizen of the same. He is a product of Arkansas, born in what is now Boone County, at Lead Hill, August 30, 1856, to the marriage of William and Margaret (Holt) Coker. The Coker family is probably the oldest in north Arkansas. The mother of our subject was a native of Tennessee, and a daughter of William Holt who moved from Tennessee to Marion County, Arkansas, in the thirties. Mr. Holt was a farmer and a prominent man in his section of the State, and he and wife passed their last days there. Our subject was fifth in order of birth of six children, as follows: Sarah, died young; G. W., a merchant of Lead Hill; Winnie; Sarah and Mary. He grew up in Lead Hill, attended the public schools of that place and in 1875 started out to make his own way in life. He first opened up a store at Isabella, Ozark County, Missouri, and continued in business there until 1881, when he moved to Gainesville. Later he went from there to West Plains, embarked in general merchandising by himself, and continued this successfully for six years. After that he engaged in the stock business, buying, selling and shipping, and is now one of the foremost business men...

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Biography of George W. Coker

GEORGE W. COKER. In compiling an account of the mercantile establishments of the town of Lead Hill, Arkansas, it is the desire of the publishers to particularly mention those classes of houses which are the best representatives of each special line of trade, and which contribute most to the city’s reputation as a source of supply. As one of the leading representatives of general merchants and cotton dealers, the firm of G. W. Coker & Co. may well be quoted, for the extensive trade they have built up is the outgrowth of enterprise and commercial sagacity. Mr. Coker was born in Marion County, Arkansas, in 1850, and is a son of William and Margaret (Holt) Coker, both born in the year 1821, the former in Marion County, Arkansas, and the latter in Cannon County, Tennessee Previous to her union with Mr. Coker, the mother of Geo. W. Coker married Thomas Pumphrey in Tennessee, and in 1839 came to Ozark County, Missouri, where she remained a few years. From there she moved to Fulton County, Arkansas, where Mr. Pumphrey died. After the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Coker they resided in Marion County, Arkansas, until the Civil War, when they refugeed to Greene County, Missouri There Mr. Coker died in 1865. He was a successful farmer and stockraiser, a prominent Mason for a good many years, and a Democrat in...

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Slave Narrative of Neil Coker

Interviewer: Martin D. Richardson Person Interviewed: Neil Coker Location: Grandin, Florida Interesting tales of the changes that came to the section of Florida that is situated along the Putnam-Clay County lines are told by Neil Coker, old former slave who lives two miles south of McRae on the road Grandin. Coker is the son of a slave mother and a half-Negro. His father, he states, was Senator John Wall, who held a seat in the senate for sixteen years. He was born in Virginia, and received his family name from an old family bearing the same in that state. He was born, as nearly as he can remember, about 1857. One of Coker’s first reminiscences is of the road on which he still lives. During his childhood it was known as the ‘Bellamy Road,’ so called because it was built, some 132 years ago, by a man of that name who hailed from West Florida. The ‘Bellamy Road’ was at one time the main route of traffic between Tallahassee and St. Augustine. Interestingly enough, the road is at least 30 miles southwest of St. Augustine where it passes through Grandin; the reason for cutting it in such a wide circle, Coker says was because of the ferocity of the Seminoles in the swamps north and west of St. Augustine. Wagons, carriages and stages passed along this road in the...

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Biography of J. W. Coker

J. W. COKER, county sheriff. Connected with the history of the elections of Marion County, Arkansas, no name is more prominent or has borne with it more eclat than that of Coker. This gentleman is admirably adapted to the position he fills, for he is courageous, energetic and wide-awake, yet he has at the same time a pleasant and affable manner, is full of business, and attends to his duties very promptly. As he was born in the county January 29, 1852, and has lived here all his life, the people have had every opportunity to judge of his character and qualifications, and naught has ever been said derogatory to his good name. He is the eldest child born to his parents (see sketch of Dr. J. M. Coker), and his early education was acquired in the district schools, where he gained an excellent knowledge of the “world of books ” through that energy and push that has been so characteristic of him. After reaching manhood he began farming some ten miles southwest of Yellville on Hampton Creek, and there still owns a good farm of 640 acres, some of which is exceptionally fertile, and as it is located in the great mineral belt it is probably rich in minerals also. In 1893 he was elected by the Democrat party, of which he has always been a member, to...

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