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Surname: Clarke

Descendants of Thomas Boyden of Bridgewater, MA

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now BOYDEN (Walpole-Bridgewater family). For a half century – for fifty and more years: – the name Boyden has stood in the town of Bridgewater, Mass., as a synonym for the highest type of useful, ennobling and elevating citizenship, as exemplified in the life of the now venerable principal emeritus of the Bridgewater State Normal School, Prof. Albert Gardner Boyden, who for the long period of fifty and more years has been identified as student, teacher and principal with the noted institution of learning alluded to, and...

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Hussey and Morgan Families of New Bedford MA

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now HUSSEY-MORGAN (New Bedford families). These families, while not among those early here, are of approximately a hundred years’ standing in this community, and with their allied connections are among the very respectable and wealthy families of the locality, the heads of two of these families here considered being the late George Hussey and Charles Wain Morgan, who were extensively engaged in whaling and shipping interests here in New Bedford through much of the first half of the nineteenth century. Here follows in detail arranged chronologically from the first American ancestor the Hussey genealogy, together with that of some of its allied connections, et cetera. Christopher Hussey, baptized 18th of 2d month, 1599, at Dorking, County of Surrey, England, son of John and Mary (Wood) of that place, and for a time in Holland, married Theodate, daughter of Stephen Batchelder, and came from London to New England in the same vessel with Mr. Batchelder, arriving at Boston in the “William and Francis,” in 1632. He probably remained at Lynn, where his father-in-law was sometime minister, until 1636, then went to Newbury and there resided a year or two. He was deputy in 1637, was one of the original settlers of Hampton in 1638, at which time his mother was there with him, and was active and prominent...

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Descendants of Rev. George Shove of Fall River, MA

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now SHOVE. Rev. George Shove, gentleman, son of Margery, who was admitted to the church at Boston as a widow in 1638, and who subsequently was of Rowley and a proprietor and still later of Roxbury, where she married in 1654 Richard Peacock, became the third minister of Taunton, ordained Nov. 17, 1665. Of his ministerial life little is known except that be “preached acceptably,” and taught the Taunton school; and it is said that “no rumor of strife or discord in connection with him comes down to us.” His fame, however, as a land bolder and dealer in real estate bas not failed to reach us. He is represented as having been largely concerned in the secular transactions of the town and possessed of considerable wealth. He was one of the six original proprietors of Assonet Neck, when that purchase was made in 1680. His home lot was that of William Phillips, one of the first settlers on the east side of what is now High street, between Cohannet and Winthrop streets. On July 14, 1664, Mr. Shove married Hopestill, daughter of Rev. Samuel Newman, a learned man, the distinguished minister of Rehoboth. She died March 7, 1673, and he married Feb. 17, 1674-75, Mrs. Hannah Walley. She died in September, 1685, and he married Dec....

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Contributions of the Lowell Massachusetts Historical Society

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The Lowell Historical Society of Lowell Massachusetts published 2 volumes of “contributions” to the recording of the history of Lowell Massachusetts at the turn of the century. These contributions were preceded by the contributions by the Old Residents Historical Association of Lowell, Massachusetts. Table of Contents Volume I Bunker Hill, The Battle of, and Those Who Participated Therein from the Towns from which Lowell was Formed, Mrs. Sara Swan Griffin Fiske, Rev. John, by Henry S. Perham Francis, Mrs. Sarah W., by Miss Mabel Hill Lincoln,...

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History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s,...

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Bloody Scenes in Alabama and Georgia

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now At this period, some exciting scenes occurred in the region now known as North Alabama. We have already followed a party of emigrants to the Cumberland. Many others flocked to that country, and it soon became well settled, for a wild country. The Upper Creeks and Cherokees continually made war upon these Cumberland people. The French, upon the Wabash, had, for a long time, carried on a commerce, near the sites of the present towns of Tuscumbia and Florence. So long as M. Viez was at the head of this trade, the Cumberland people were not harassed; but, recently, he had been succeeded by others, who supplied the Indians with arms, and encouraged them to attack the American settlements. The latter had only acted upon the defensive, but it was now determined to advance upon the frontier towns of the Indians. June 1 1787: One hundred and thirty men assembled, from different parts of the Cumberland region, and marched, under Colonel James Robertson, to the Tennessee river, piloted by two Chickasaws. David Hays was dispatched from Nashville with boats, laden with provisions, destined for the Muscle Shoals. Descending the Cumberland, he was furiously attacked by the Indians, at the mouth of Duck River, and, after some of his men had been killed and others wounded, he...

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Early Residents of Butte, Montana

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Among the prominent citizens of Butte is Dr E. D. Leavitt, a native of New Hampshire. He is a graduate of the Wesleyan University of Middletown, Connecticut, and Harvard Medical College. After passing three years in Colorado, beginning with the Pike’s Peak excitement of 1859, in 1862 he removed to Montana, where he has ever since resided, being now a permanent resident of Butte, and giving his sole attention to his large and increasing practice. In 1888 he was nominated by the republicans as delegate to congress. In 1888 he was elected president of the Medical association of Montana. During 1888 and 1889 he has been and is at present health-officer of Butte. By Gov. Leshe he was lately appointed one of the board of territorial medical examiners. Few men in southern Montana are more widely respected either professionally or for their unselfish devotion to the interests of their adopted state. John L. Murphy was born in Platte County, Missouri, in 1842, and educated in a private school. At the age of 17 years he went to Denver, where he was clerk in a store for a year and a half, after which he went into business for himself. He took a situation subsequently as an agent of Holladay’s express, but finally purchased teams, and began...

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Slave Narrative of Anna Smith

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Geo. H. Conn Person Interviewed: Anna Smith Location: Ohio Place of Birth: Henderson Kentucky Date of Birth: May 1833 Age: 100+ Place of Residence: 518 Bishop Street Writer Wilbur C. Ammon, Editor C.R. McLean, District Supervisor June 11, 1937 Folklore Summit County, District #5 In a little old rocking chair, sits an old colored “mammy” known to her friends as “Grandma” Smith, spending the remaining days with her grandchildren. Small of stature, tipping the scales at about 100 lbs. but alert to the wishes and cares of her children, this old lady keeps posted on current events from those around her. With no stoop or bent back and with a firm step she helps with the housework and preparing of meals, waiting, when permitted, on others. In odd moments, she like to work at her favorite task of “hooking” rag rugs. Never having worn glasses, her eyesight is the envy of the younger generation. She spends most of the time at home, preferring her rocker and pipe (she has been smoking for more than eighty year) to a back seat in an automobile. When referring to Civil War days, her eyes flash and words flow from her with a fluency equal to that of any youngster. Much of her speech is hard to understand as...

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Biography of Rev. John S. Clarke

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Stokes Clarke, Pastor of the Canada Methodist Church, Oshawa, and son of John and Rose (Stokes) Clarke, was born in the town of Clones, in the north of Ireland, February 8, 1833. His father was a merchant and Clerk of the Peace, the ancestors leaving England about the time of William III., the family holding various civic and important positions in the County of Monaghan, Ireland. Our subject received his literary education in the old country, his tutor being the Rev. William White, a Presbyterian Minister. In his seventeenth year he came to Canada West; studied Theology in the Methodist School at Toronto; entered on the ministry in 1834, and has since been pastor at Barrie, London, Bradford, Napanee, Grimsby, Thorold, Whitby and Oshawa, three full years at each place. At most of these villages his preaching has been attended with large ingatherings, between 200 and 300 members having been added to the Oshawa Church since he located here in 1877. As a preacher Mr. Clarke is earnest and practical; he does not abound in figures and illustrations, but uses both with good taste and judgment. As a platform speaker he is easy and forcible, and is an effective advocate of all moral reforms. As a pastor he is very faithful in his duties, especially...

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