Surname: Cecil

Biography of William Harrison Cecil

WILLIAM HARRISON CECIL, is a dry goods merchant in Harrison, Arkansas (July 9, 1894), and was born in Newton County, Arkansas, on July 9, 1854. His parents were Riley and Sarah J. (Harrison) Cecil, the former born in Arkansas July IO, 1829, the latter in Tennessee, April 11, 1835. Riley was a son of Solomon Cecil, who was born in Tennessee in 1786, and who was married to Sally Hatfield, in Tennessee, in 1814. There were born to them seven sons and two daughters, Riley being the fifth child. Two sons and one daughter are now living in Visalia, Cal. Solomon Cecil moved to Arkansas in 1827, and settled in Newton County, on what is now known as Cecil Fork of Buffalo River, he being among the first settlers in this part of the country. At that time there were no settlers nearer than what is now called Yellville, then called Shawnee Town, being forty miles away, and this was where he had to do his milling. On Buffalo River the cane grew very thick and tall, growing as high as fifteen to twenty feet, on which horses and cattle would live throughout the winter without any other food; hogs would live there on the mast. He had to raise only corn and vegetables for the use of the family, wheat not being raised, as there were no wheat...

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Biography of William H. Cecil

WILLIAM H. CECIL. The calling of the merchant is one of the most hon-orable lines of industry, and one of its most worthy exponents at Harrison is William H. Cecil, who is a native of Jasper, Newton County, Arkansas, where he first saw the light of day July 9, 1854. His parents, Riley and Sarah (Harrison) Cecil, were born in Tennessee, and the former was a son of William Cecil, who became a resident of Newton County, Arkansas, during the early history of the county and settled on what is called the Cecil Fork of the Buffalo River. There the grandfather died at an early day, and his widow in 1857 started on the overland journey to California, and was in the wagon train that was massacred in Utah by the Mormons and Indians, known in history as the Mountain Meadow Massacre, but fortunately two days before that event she and her sons had left the train and taken another trail and thus escaped a horrible death. She was the mother of six sons and several daughters, of whom Riley was but a lad when his parents came to Arkansas. He was married in Newton County, and for some time thereafter lived on Big Buffalo River, the father dying there in 1856. He was a successful tiller of the soil, and to him-self and wife two children were born:...

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Biographical Sketch of J. F. Cecil

J. F. Cecil was born in Maury County, Tennessee, in 1849. He was taken to Clark County, Ohio, when he was one year old, and he lived there till 1878, when he removed to Shawnee County, Kansas. He had been at his present location since 1882, following the business of raising fruit and nursery stock, and also engaged in a general line of farming. He was married to Miss Hattie Parkhurst, of Madison, Wisconsin in 1885. They have two sons: Kirk, 29 years of age, and Ralph, 27 years old, both of whom are in business in the...

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Earl Cecil

Private, 118th Inf., Co. E, 30th Div. Born in Guilford County; son of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Cecil. Entered the service at High Point, N.C., July 30, 1917. Was sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., and from there to Camp Mills. Sailed for France May 11, 1918. Received machine gun wound at Bellicourt, Oct. 9th. Was sent to Australian Base Hospital No. 23. Was in all battles with the 118th until wounded. Returned to USA Feb. 23, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., May 21,...

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H. A. Cecil

Yeoman 2nd Class. Born March 31, 1890; son of Y. F. and Armanda Cecil, of Guilford County. Husband of Zada P. Cecil. Entered service June 3, 1918, at Raleigh, N.C. Sent to Norfolk, Va., June 4, 1918. Transferred to St. Helena, then to Hampton Roads. On Battleship U. S. S. New Jersey. Later transferred to Newport, R. I., Training Station. Served with clerical forces. Home address, High Point, N.C. Mustered out at Newport, R. I., June 14,...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry Cecil

Henry Cecil, farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. Charleston; owns 215 acres worth $40 per acre; he was born in Mercer Co., Ky., Feb. 15, 1826; lived on the farm, engaged with his father in farming until 21 years of age. Was then married to Hannah E. Robinson Oct. 7, 1847; she was born in Shelby Co., Ky., July 23, 1827; they have had seven children – Keziah F., Margaret J., Henry H., Mary R. E., Adda, Daniel E., and John I., who is dead. Mr. Cecil held the office of School Director six years, and Constable three years; Mrs. Cecil’s parents were one of the first families of Virginia; Mr. Cecil is one the best farmers in the...

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Biography of William C. Cecil, M. D.

William C. Cecil, M. D. A really successful merchant, doctor, lawyer or farmer is the man who enjoys a just and adequate compensation for important service rendered in his particular field. It is that kind of success which is enjoyed by Dr. William C. Cecil of Stark, Kansas. He was the pioneer doctor in that community and for thirty years has given his services to rich and poor, and especially in the early days at the cost of much physical hardship to himself. Doctor Cecil is descended from a notable American family. There is a county back in Maryland named Cecil, and his ancestors furnished that name. The Cecils were originally English people, and a branch of them came over to Maryland at the time of Lord Baltimore, the founder of the colony. Doctor Cecil’s grandfather, William Cecil, was born in Cecil County, Maryland, moved from there to North Carolina, and died about 1828 when his son Reuben was six months old. This Grandfather Cecil at one time owned a distillery in North Carolina. Reuben Cecil, father of Doctor Cecil, was born in North Carolina in 1828. His early years were spent near High Point, North Carolina, and at the age of twenty he came west and found a home in Hancock County, Illinois. He was married there, and for many years followed the trade of blacksmith, and was...

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