Surname: Carver

Carver, William Lyman – Obituary

Funeral rites have not been arranged for William L. Carver, about 75, Black Eagle, who died Thursday [September 18, 1947] at his home, 1915 Smelter Avenue. Carver was an early-day Montana cowboy and for many years was deputy sheriff and state stock inspector of Chouteau County. The body is at Croxford’s Mortuary. Carver was born in Klamath Co., Ore., and came to Montana in 1886. Survivors include seven children, Clarence Harold Peterson, a stepson, of Danvers, Mont.; Mrs. Pile Marcoff, Ashuelot, Mont.; Mrs. Rose Mosley, Glasgow; George W. Carver, Highwood; William J. Carver, Black Eagle; James L. Carver, Black Eagle, and Mrs. Sue McElry, Detroit. One brother, James, of Ellensburg, Wash., and four sisters, Mrs. Thomas Williams, Pasco, Wash.; Mrs. Hattie Harris, Ellensburg; Mrs. J. H. Ferguson, Ellensburg, and Mrs. J. A. Grimm, Clarkston, Wash., and 26 grandchildren, also are survivors. Great Falls Tribune, September 19, 1947 Contributed by: Shelli...

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Carver, William – Obituary

William Carver, of Baker Dies William Carver, about 52 years of age, died suddenly, at 10:30 o’clock Monday morning while engaged at his duties at the slaughter plant of the Smith Packing company. Mr. Carver had been engaged as a packing house man for about 30 years, the past 15 years in the employ of the Smith Packing company. He is survived by his widow and two sons, John and George all residents of Baker. Oregon Trail Weekly North Powder News Saturday, August 20,...

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Biography of Byron Jennings Carver

Byron Jennings Carver, who served as county attorney for Miami County from 1913 to 1917, had not only proved his ability on many occasions as an able lawyer, but also as a forceful man of affairs and one who is willing to fight for his convictions and his position as to right. Mr. Carver had a hard struggle to get into the legal profession, being a poor young man and having to teach and struggle along at the same time that he was studying and qualifying for the bar. He is a native of Indiana, having been born at Franklin in Johnson County July 31, 1874. He was one of the seven children of Captain Socrates and Mary (Day) Carver, both natives of Indiana. His father was a son of an associate judge of the Court of Common Pleas, who had come from Virginia to Indiana. Grandfather Judge Carver married a Miss Tracy. The Tracy family came to America in 1640, from Scotland, and located in Maryland. They were a mingling of Scotch, Irish and English ancestry. Nathaniel Tracy and some of his brothers, Charles, Thomas, Philip and William, were also soldiers in the Revolutionary war. Nathaniel Tracy subsequently removed to Kentucky and lived there until 1818. Thomas and John F. Tracy, sons of William and Elizabeth (Tanner) Tracy, were soldiers in the Mexican war and fought at Buena...

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