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Surname: Caldwell

Ancestry of the Embert Howard Family of Brockton Massachusetts

EMBERT HOWARD, long one of the most successful business men of Brockton, of which city he is also one of the foremost citizens, is a worthy representative of a family which has historic identity with the earliest settling of New England. For two hundred and sixty and more years the family bearing this name has dwelt in the Bridgewaters and in the region of country thereabouts, the posterity of John Haward, who was one of the early settlers of Duxbury, Mass. The genealogy following traces the line in chronological order from this immigrant ancestor.

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Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War, 1U.S. House, Executive Documents, 22d congress, first session, no. 116, President’s Message submitting the memorial of the Creek Indians. “when we had not...

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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Muster Roll of Captain Albion P. Arnold’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Albion P. Arnold’s Company of Artillery in th6 Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service “by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the seventeenth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered. Captain Albion P. Arnold. Lieutenant Charles B. Bates. Sergeants George W. Armstrong, Sylvanus Fairbanks. Rufus K. Lane. John S. Morrill. Corporals Daniel F. Ayer. William P. Caldwell. Cyrus C. Fairbanks. William Walker. Musicians Charles E. Hodges. Sumner Smith. Privates Allen, George. Allen, Josiah. Atwood, George M Blaisdell, Orrin W. Brown, John W. Butler, Samuel. Campbell, Rufus. Choate, James R. Dudley, Stephen. Earle, Joseph. Fogg, Francis A. Follett, John E. Folsom, Cyrus H. Haines, George W. Hall, Samuel P. Hammond, George W, Jacobs, John. Knowles, Augustus. Knowles, John. Lawton, Daniel. Leeman, Moses D. Lyon, William. Melvin, Adorno L. Moody, Edlon D. Moshier, Stephen. Page, Charles R. Page, David L. Patch, Jonathan. Perkins, William. Pinkham, William, Quint, Ivory. Ramsdell, Harvey. Russell, Samuel B. Stanley, George W. Webster, Nathan. Whittier, Jonathan, Wiggin, James M. Yeaton, Phineas,...

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Leroy Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Albertsen, Albert. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. R. 274.63 ac., sec. 1. (16.) Owner, Edwin F. Johnson. Anderson, A. R. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 360 ac., sec. 25. (33.) Anderson, Chris. Wf. Christina; ch. Christina, Lauritz, Amelia, Iler, Alfred, Samuel and Clarence. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 80 ac., sec. 26. (8.) Anderson, Jens C. Wf. Marie; ch. A. H. C., Carrie, Dagmar, Samuel, Dorcas and Theodora. P. O. Audubon, R. 6. O. 240 ac., sec. 19,...

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Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to...

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Rood Creek Mounds

Rood Creek Mounds (also known as Roods Creek Mounds) is a very large Native American town site in southwestern Georgia that is immediately east of the Chattahoochee River in Stewart County. It was one of the largest Native American towns in the eastern United States. The original palisade enclosed about 120 acres and eight mounds. The final palisade enclosed at least eight mounds and 150 acres.   The archaeological zone is now within Rood Landing Recreation Area, a US Army Corps of Engineers facility on Lake Eufaula. Relatively little is known about this archaeological zone. Four mounds (A, B, D...

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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

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Biographical Sketch of Gilman Caldwell

Caldwell, Gilman, Bristol, was born in the town of Ware, N. H., on August 26, 1812. He was a son of Isaac J. and Sarah (Richards) Caldwell. His father was one of the prominent men of the town of Ware, N. H., and was a son of James Caldwell, who was a Revolutionary patriot, participating in the battles of Bunker Hill and Bennington, and was a resident of New Boston, N. H. Gilman’s parents settled in Lincoln, Vt., about 1839. He has been engaged in the manufacture of shingles, and also in the lumber business in general. He made the first clapboards and shingles which were ever manufactured in Lincoln, Vt. He settled in Bristol, Vt., in 1871. He was married on January 17, 1841, to Harriet Goodnow, a daughter of Levi and Clarissa (Wheeler) Goodnow, who were natives of Salisbury, Mass. Harriet was born in Peacham, Washington county, Vt., on March 28, 1819. Their children were Alma J. (born on September 6, 1842, now Mrs. Jesse Ridley, of Bristol, Vt.; she has a family of four children), Josephine (born on June 3, 1845, now Mrs. Milo Varney), and Mary B. (born on May 18, 1848, now at home with her...

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Biographical Sketch of B. M. Caldwell

(See Grant and Duncan) -Benjamin Morris, son of John Johnson and Caroline Maria (Thompson) Caldwell, was born August 9, 1889. Educated in the Cherokee Public schools, and married Cora Bell Smith. Caroline Maria Caldwell, nee Thompson, was born July 18, 1860. She married January 12, 1879 John Johnson Caldwell, born February 27, 1849, in Pendleton County, Kentucky. She died February 2, 1894. They were the parents of Benjamin Morris...

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Biographical Sketch of Henry C. Caldwell, M.P.P.

William Clyde Caldwell, member of the local Legislature for North Lanark, W and a prominent business man in that riding, is a son of Alexander and Mary Ann (Maxwell) Caldwell, both natives of Scotland, and both dying in 1872. He was born in the village of Lanark, Ontario, May 14, 1843, and received his education at Queen’s College, Kingston, whence he was graduated in 1864. His father was a lumberman, which business our subject also makes a specialty, cutting about 6,000,000 feet annually, and shipping most of it to Oswego, New York. He also manufactures flour, doing custom and merchant work, and has a farm of something like 400 acres, partially under improvement. Mr. Caldwell has held the office of village councilor, reeve, school trustee, etc., and has devoted considerable time to municipal and other local interests. He’s possessing a large share of public spirit as well as enterprise. In 1872 Daniel Galbraith, member of the Ontario Parliament for North Lanark, resigned his seat, in order to run for the House of Commons, and Mr. Caldwell was elected to take his place. At the general elections in 1875 he was again a candidate, and was defeated. In 1879 he contested the seat once more, and received a majority of more than two hundred votes; it being a Reform constituency, and he drawing out the full strength of the...

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Biographical Sketch of Captain Samuel Caldwell

Samuel Caldwell was born in Orange County, N.C., on the 10th of February, 1759, and moved to Tryon county, afterward Lincoln, in 1772. He first entered the service in Captain Gowen’s company in 1776, and marched against the Cherokee Indians beyond the mountains. In 1779, he volunteered (in Captain William Chronicle’s company) in the “nine months service,” and joined General Lincoln’s army at Purysburg, S.C. In March, 1780, he joined Captain Isaac White’s company, and marched to King’s Mountain. In the battle which immediately followed, he and his brother, William actively participated. Shortly after this celebrated victory, he attached himself to Captain Montgomery’s company and was in the battle of the Cowpens, fought on the 17th of January, 1781. Soon afterward he marched to Guilford, and was in the battle fought there on the 15th of March, 1781. In the following fall, he substituted for Clement Nance, in Captain Lemmonds cavalry company in the regiment commanded by Col. Robert Smith and Major Joseph Graham. At the Raft Swamp, they attacked and signally defeated a large body of Tories; and in two days afterward defeated a band of Tories on Alfred Moore’s plantation opposite Wilmington. On the next day, the same troops made a vigorous attack on the garrison, near the same place. After this service, he returned home and was frequently engaged in other minor but important military duties...

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Biography of Capt. Thomas Caldwell

Capt. Thomas Caldwell, of Irish parentage, was born in the eastern part of Mecklenburg county, (now Cabarrus), in 1753. He early espoused the cause of liberty, and entered the service in 1775, in Capt. John Springs’ company as a private, and marched to the protection of the frontier settlements from the murderous and plundering incursions of the Cherokee Indians. He again joined the service in Capt. Ezekiel Polk’s company and marched against the Tories in South Carolina, near the post of Ninety-Six. In 1776, he volunteered under Captain William Alexander, Colonels Adam Alexander and Robert Irwin, General Rutherford commanding; marched to the Quaker Meadows, at the head of the Catawba River, and thence to the Cherokee country, beyond the mountains. After severely chastising the Indians, killing a few, and laying waste their country, causing them to sue for peace, the expedition returned. In 1870, he was appointed Captain by General Thomas Polk to assist in opposing the advance of Lord Cornwallis. After Cornwallis left Charlotte, in October, 1780, he raised a company, placed himself under Colonel Williams, of South Carolina, and fought under him and Colonel Lee, at Pyles’ defeat, on Haw River. He also acted for some time as Quartermaster, at the Hospital, in Charlotte. In 1781 he volunteered under Colonel Davie, and was with him at the battle of Hanging Rock. This was Captain Caldwell’s last important...

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Slave Narrative of Alice Battle

Interviewer: Elizabeth Watson Person Interviewed: Alice Battle Date of Interview: 1936 Location: Hawkinsville, Georgia During the 1840’s, Emanuel Caldwell—born in North Carolina, and Neal Anne Caldwell—born in South Carolina, were brought to Macon by “speculators” and sold to Mr. Ed Marshal of Bibb County. Some time thereafter, this couple married on Mr. Marshal’s plantation, and their second child, born about 1850, was Alice Battle. From her birth until freedom, Alice was a chattel of this Mr. Marshal, whom she refers to as a humane man, though inclined to use the whip when occasion demanded. Followed to its conclusion, Alice’s life history is void of thrills and simply an average ex-slave’s story. As a slave, she was well fed, well clothed, and well treated, as were her brother and sister slaves. Her mother was a weaver, her father—a field hand, and she did both housework and plantation labor. Alice saw the Yankee pass her ex-master’s home with their famous prisoner, Jeff Davis, after his capture, in ’65. The Yankee band, says she, was playing “We’ll hang Jeff Davis on a Sour Apple Tree”. Some of the soldiers “took time out” to rob the Marshal smokehouse. The Whites and Negroes were all badly frightened, but the “damyankees didn’t harm nobody”. After freedom, Alice remained with the Marshals until Christmas, when she moved away. Later, she and her family moved back to...

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