Surname: Burns

1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – B Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. B Surnames BABBITT, Albert C. (Lucile Meadows) Avon R5 Berwick Sec31 T80a Bion Lincoln (1918) Tels. Greenbush and Avon BABBIT, Edwin (Clara Johnson) Ch Livina, Dale, Albert, Florine, *Ira, *Mary, *Emery,*Homer, *Jessie, *Hobart; Avon R5 Berwick Sec27 T355a H.A. and C.E. Saunders (1901) Tels. Avon and Greenbush BACON, Charles A. (Susie Tate) Ch Ernest, Howard, Charming, Marie; Roseville R2 Pt. Pleasant Sec21 T400a B.P. Lee (1895) Tel. Farmers’ Line Swan...

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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Marcia Burns, Mrs. John Peter Van Ness

Marcia Burns! What memories the quaint Scotch lassie’s name calls up! The city of Washington disappears and its site spreads before us in flourishing farm lands and orchards. Scattered farm houses raise their chimneys amid primeval oaks and elms, and from the low doorway of the humblest emerges the winsome form of Marcia Burns. Six hundred acres, representing the thrift of generations of Scotch ancestors, surround her. The Potomac, one of the great water-ways of the South, carrying the produce of the fertile lands above into Alexandria for consumption or reshipment, almost kisses her feet. This is her patrimony,...

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Slave Narrative of Hula Williams

Person Interviewed: Hula Williams Place of Birth: Arkansas Date of Birth: July 18, 1857 My mammy use to belong to the Burns plantation back in old Mississippi; that was before I was born, but the white overseer, a man named Kelly, was my father, so my mammy always said. She stayed with the Burns’ until her Master’s daughter married a man named Bond and moved to Jefferson County, Arkansas, about 25 miles south of Little Rock. The old Master give mammy and two other slaves to the girl when she married, that’s how come mammy to be in Arkansas when I was born, in 1857. The record says July 18. Mammy was named Emmaline and after she got to Arkansas she married one of the Bond slaves, George Washington Bond. My step-father told me one time that Master Bond tell him to get some slippery-elm bark, but step-paw forget it. And it seem like the Master done forgot it too, but on the next Sunday morning he called out for step-pappy. “Come here,” he said. “I’m going to give you a little piece of remembrance!” That was a good flogging, and some of the white neighbors look on and laugh. But there was one slave, Boyl Green, who lived on a plantation nearby that my husband told me about after we was married. That Negro said he never would...

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Slave Narrative of George Taylor Burns

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: George Taylor Burns Location: Evansville, Indiana Ex-Slave Stories District #5 Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel THE LIFE STORY OF GEORGE TAYLOR BURNS [HW: Personal Interview] Ox-carts and flat boats, and pioneer surroundings; crowds of men and women crowding to the rails of river steamboats; gay ladies in holiday attire and gentleman in tall hats, low cut vests and silk mufflers; for the excursion boats carried the gentry of every area. A little negro boy clung to the ragged skirts of a slave mother, both were engrossed in watching the great wheels that ploughed the Mississippi river into foaming billows. Many boats stopped at Gregery’s Landing, Missouri to stow away wood, for many engines were fired with wood in the early days. The Burns brothers operated a wood yard at the Landing and the work of cutting, hewing and piling wood for the commerce was performed by slaves of the Burns plantation. George Taylor Burns was five years of age and helped his mother all day as she toiled in the wood yards. “The colder the weather, the more hard work we had to do,” declares Uncle George. George Taylor Burns, the child of Missouri slave parents, recalls the scenes enacted at the Burns’ wood yards so long ago. He is a resident of Evansville, Indiana and his snow white hair and beard bear testimony that...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Wooldridge

Interviewer: Mamie Hanberry Person Interviewed: Mary Wooldridge Location: Hopkinsville, Kentucky Place of Birth: Washington County, Kentucky, Age: (about) 103 Place of Residence: Clarksville, Pike R.R. #1, Hopkinsville, Kentucky “Mary and her twin sister were slaves born in Washington County, Kentucky, near Lexington, belonging to Bob Eaglin. When Mary was about fourteen years old she and her sister was brought to the Lexington slave market and sold and a Mr. Lewis Burns of the same County purchased her. Mary doesn’t know what became of her sister. Five or six years later she was again put on the block and sold to a Negro Trader but Mary does not remember this traders name. While here she was kept in a stockade and it was several years before she again was bought by a white man. Mr. Thomas McElroy near Lexington bought her and she remained his slave until the slaves were freed. Mary looks her age. She is a tall gaunt black Negro with white hair about one inch long and very kinky, and still she dresses as the older slave woman dressed in the past days. She wears an old bodice with a very full skirt that comes to her ankles and this skirt has very long deep pockets and when I asked her why she had such pockets in her skirt her answer was, “Wal you sees honey I...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. S. J. Burns

Burns, Mrs. S. J. (Etta) (See Duncan)—Etta Hitchcock born December 14, 1860 at Park Hill, Cherokee Nation. Educated at home. She married December 30, 1880 Samuel James Burns born March 15, 1851 in Lindsey, Canada. Samuel J. and Etta Burnis have one daughter, Lily Dimple Burns, born September 30, 1881. She graduated from Worchester Academy, Vinita on May 20, 1898. Married Marshall Crutchfield Stevens, born December 1, 1879. Samuel J. and Etta Burns located in Vinita in 1884 and opened a mercantile establishment which is still in existence. Mrs. Burns, whose Cherokee name is Si-hs-shi, affiliated with the Methodist church, the Delphians and Premier Worth While clubs and is a charter member of the Eastern Star Chapter and Past Matron of the same, a member of the White Shrine and Daughters of the American Revolutions. She was President of the local cemetery association at the time it was named Fairview. Etta H. Burns is the daughter of Isaac Brown Hitchcock, born, February 28, 1825 at Dwight Missions, Arkansas Cherokee Nation. He married February 8, 1857 Elizabeth Ann Duncan, born July 10, 1833. She graduated from Female Seminary in February 1856. She died October 4, 1886 and he died January 16, 1911. They were the parents of Timothy Browns, born May 19, 1858, Etta Smith and Irenaeus Duncan Hitchcock, born September 6, 1864 in Tabor, Iowa. Jacob Hitchcock, the grandfather...

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Biography of Louis N. Burns

Louis N. Burns, who holds the offices of secretary and sales manager in the J.. I. Case Plow Works, has been connected with the manufacture of farm implements continuously since he was sixteen years of age with the exception of one, year, and his thorough knowledge of the business, his aggressiveness and sound judgment have been among the most important factors in his success. As sales manager he has developed in the sales organization a tine spirit of co-operation and loyalty to the company and has based the selling policy of the company upon a businesslike and convincing presentation of the superior merits of its products. He was born in Tazewell County, Illinois, on the 16th of January. 1866, and his parents were Louis H. and Julia (Hildebrand) Burns. The father was by occupation a farmer and both are now deceased. After completing his public school course L. N. Burns attended a business college at Peoria, but when sixteen years old began his career, entering the employ of the Kingman Plow Company at Peoria. He remained with them for twenty-nine years and rose through intermediate positions to manager of their St. Louis branch. During the year 1885 he was bookkeeper for the Bank of Dwight, at Dwight, Illinois, but decided that the implement business was more to his liking and accordingly returned to the Kingman Plow Company. He displayed...

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Biography of Robert Burns, Jr., M.D.

Dr. Robert Burns, Jr., physician and surgeon of St. Louis, with offices in the Lister building, was born August 17, 1879, in the city which is still his home. His father, Robert Burns, Sr., was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, and comes of a family that has been distinctively American in its lineal and collateral branches for several generations. He is now a patent attorney of Chicago. He married Emily Mary St. Gem, who was born in Fredericktown, Missouri, the ancestral record of her family dating back to the early part of the seventeenth century. They came to the United States from Montreal, Canada, and were long represented in Missouri. The marriage of Mr. And Mrs. Robert Burns, Sr., was celebrated in St. Louis in 1878. Their only child is Robert Burns, Jr., who was educated in the public schools of St. Louis, in Smith Academy and in Washington University. He pursued his professional course in the last named institution, winning his M. D. degree in 1901. He was then appointed assistant to Dr. Herman Tuholski in the St. Louis Surgical Hospital and from 1901 until 1911 he also held the offices of junior assistant and senior assistant in Washington University Hospital. From 1911 until 1917 he was operating assistant to Dr. Herman Tuholski and through the succeeding two years was in the army service. Since 1909 he has been...

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Slave Narrative of Julia Brown (Aunt Sally)

Interviewer: Geneva Tonsill Person Interviewed: Julia Brown (Aunt Sally) Date of Interview: July 25, 1930 [TR:?] Location: 710 Griffin, Place, N. W., Atlanta, Georgia Ah Always Had A Hard Time Aunt Sally rocked back and forth incessantly. She mopped her wrinkled face with a dirty rag as she talked. “Ah wuz born fo’ miles frum Commerce, Georgia, and wuz thirteen year ole at surrender. Ah belonged to the Nash fambly—three ole maid sisters. My mama belonged to the Nashes and my papa belonged to General Burns; he wuz a officer in the war. There wuz six of us chilluns, Lucy, Malvina, Johnnie, Callie, Joe and me. We didn’t stay together long, as we wuz give out to different people. The Nashes didn’t believe in selling slaves but we wuz known as their niggers. They sold one once ’cause the other slaves said they would kill him ’cause he had a baby by his own daughter. So to keep him frum bein’ kilt, they sold him. “My mama died the year of surrender. Ah didn’t fare well after her death, Ah had sicha hard time. Ah wuz give to the Mitchell fambly and they done every cruel thing they could to me. Ah slept on the flo’ nine years, winter and summer, sick or well. Ah never wore anything but a cotton dress, a shimmy and draw’s. That ‘oman didn’t care...

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Biography of W. F. Burns

W. F. Burns, who has engaged in general merchandising in Nampa since 1893, and is one of the successful merchants of the town, was born in McDonald county, Missouri, on the 25th of February, 1859, and is of Scotch and Irish line-age. His parents, E. F. and M. E. (Kennedy) Burns were natives of Georgia and Tennessee, respectively, and several generations of the family lived in the south. The paternal great grand father of our subject was one of the heroes who fought for the independence of the nation. E. F. Burns was a prominent farmer, and successfully carried on agricultural pursuits for many years. He belonged to the Methodist church and took an active part in public affairs, being called to many positions of honor and trust. He served as United States marshal for a number of years and discharged his duties with marked promptness and fidelity. At the commencement of hostilities in the civil war he espoused the cause of the south, joining the Confederate army, but early in the struggle he was made a prisoner of war and incarcerated in Indiana until the war was al-most ended. He departed this life in the seventy-fourth year of his age: and his wife, who had died some years previously, was sixty-six years old at the time of her demise. They were the parents of eight children. W. F....

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