Surname: Burbank

Ancestors of Daniel Waldo Field of Brockton MA

Daniel Waldo Field, an extensive shoe manufacturer of Brockton, Mass., and one of the founders and for a number of years president, of the Clark-Hudson Company, shoe jobbers, of Boston and New York, is a citizen of whom Brockton is justly proud. Besides establishing a large and prosperous industry which has brought plenty and content into many a workingman’s home, he has given largely to philanthropic enterprises, some of which actually owe their existence to his generosity. He was born in Brockton, Feb. 18, 1856, son of William L. and Mary D. (Holmes) Field.

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Kelley Family of New Bedford, MA

KELLEY (New Bedford family Haverhill branch). At New Bedford for several generations have lived what for designation may be termed the Haverhill-New Bedford Kelleys. Reference is made to some of the descendants of William Kelley and his wife Abigail (Cannon) Kelley, both natives of the town of Haverhill, one of whose sons, the late Henry C. Kelley, was in the earlier half of the nineteenth century a merchant in New Bedford, and his son, the present Charles Sampson Kelley, since young manhood has been one of the most active and useful citizens of the city, having coupled his name with most if not all of the projects which have tended to the developing and modernizing of the city, one whose efforts in this direction have been especially conspicuous; and who, as a business man, banker and broker, is the architect of his own successful career.

The name Kelley, which was originally spelled Kelleigh, can be traced back to a period prior to the Norman conquest, and its barons are undoubtedly descended from the ancient Britons. The principal manorial seat of the family in England has been for many centuries located in the small parish of Kelly (or Kelley) in Devonshire. Burke and Shirley both agree as to its great antiquity, and the latter asserts that the Kellys have been lords of the manor from the reign of Henry II. (1154-1189). All the Kelleys in New England prior to 1690, with the exception of David Kelley of Yarmouth, Mass., freeman, 1657, and possibly one other family, appear to have been of English origin, and in all probability were of the Devonshire stock.

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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Wakefield Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Samuel Wakefield and his wife Mary Burbank, came from Kennebunk in 1756 or 57, and settled at the head of the bay on the lot now comprising a considerable part of Steuben village. Their children were Samuel, Lydia, Ruth, Benjamin, Phebe, Hannah and Sally. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Wakefield m. a widow Small, and their children were James, Myriam and Daniel.

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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Bartlett Family Genealogy

Typing on six onion skinned papers, Ralph Sylvester Bartlett presented his lineage in the early 1900’s. His Bartlett family were early pioneers in Kittery Maine in the section later known as Eliot Maine. Whether he ever meant to compile these pages into book form is left for you to interpret, but somebody did eventually compile the 6 pages they had of his family tree. We provide the entire 6 pages in digital format below the transcription.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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History of the Industries of Norwich VT

Although the products of the industries in Norwich have not been of great magnitude they have been quite varied in character. Such information in regard to these callings as we have been able to obtain we will present to our readers, though not in strict chronological order. Among the earliest establishments coming under this head was a grist mill established as early as 1770, by Hatch and Babcock on Blood Brook, on or near the site of the grist mill now operated by J. E. Willard, a short distance up the stream from where it empties into the Connecticut...

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First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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1894 Michigan State Census – Dickinson County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Dickinson County. Breen Township. – William Allen, William H. Morris, George Fugal, Thomas Reiley. Breitung Township. – Philip Schell, James Durand, John L. Buell, Jerome Dakota, George P. Shaver. Felch Township. – Moses Brisk, Henry Duffy, Thomas Reiley, Thomas Quaid. Norway Township. – Robert Fisher, Michael Mullen. Sagola Township. – John Paranto, Richard Cleveland. Waucedah Township. – Salmon P. Saxton, Enos Renier, Henry G. Rothwell. Iron Mountain City, Second Ward. – W. T. Carpenter, Samuel Bassett. Iron Mountain City, Third Ward. – Patrick McCrystal. Iron Mountain City, Fourth Ward. – Joseph W. Burbank, Richard G. Thomas, William W. Felch, James Dewees, George H. Johnson, Edward S. Raymond, [Jos. French]. Iron Mountain City, Fifth Ward. – A. J. Hunting, W. E. Herrington, Robert P. Tuten, Peter Lavarer, Reuben A. Smith, Hiram H. Bradford, O. J. Derache, [William H. Sweet]. Norway City, First Ward. – James B. Lyon, Joseph Coutware, John H. Gauslin. Norway City, Second Ward. – James E. McDonald, John Gatherer, Thomas P....

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B Surnames – Walpole Massachusetts Marriage Records to 1850

BABBITT, Betsey and Samuel G. Clap, Mar. 8, 1843. Sarah P., 21, d. Willard and S., and Luther Hayward, widower [publishment of intention of marriage, omits widower], May 29, 1848. Sophia and George Copeland, Apr. 10, 1842. BACON, Alfred of Dover, and Harriett Perry, Nov. 27, 1834. Anna of Dedham, and William Kindall 1st, publishment of intention of marriage, Mar. 19, 1774. Betsy [publishment of intention of marriage, Betsey] and Jonathan Colbourn [publishment of intention of marriage, Coulbourn], May 23, 1797. Charlotte and George W. Thomas, May 28, 1840. Dean and Sybil C. Smith, publishment of intention of marriage, Nov. 13, 1836. Elijah C., widower [publishment of intention of marriage, omits widower], 41, S. W[illia]m and S., and Adaline Eldridge, Dec. 4, 1848. Ellis and Martha Shepard, publishment of intention of marriage, Feb. 12, 1842. James of N. Y., and Julia [publishment of intention of marriage, adds C.] Whitman, Jan. 8, 1845. Lydia and Hiram H. White, Sept. 27, 1836. Mary and Aaron Ellis, Mar. 17, 1796. Rebecca of Deadham, and Joseph Day, publishment of intention of marriage, July 26, 1772. Sally [publishment of intention of marriage, Betsy] and Horace Dupee, May 30, 1805. Sam[ue]l W. [publishment of intention of marriage, Warren] of Urbana, Va., and Abby P. Clap, Oct. 17, 1839. Sarah L. and Harvey Morse, Jan. 10, 1837. Sopha [publishment of intention of marriage, Sophia] and Pitt...

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Biography of Mrs. Mary E. Burbank

MRS. MARY E. BURBANK. – The wife of Honorable A.R. Burbank was born near Milford, Delaware, January 14, 1827, and is the daughter of Jesse E. and Ellen Eckles. While but a child of sixteen months, she was bereft of her mother by death, and was intrusted to the care of her sable nurse until three years old. At this date she moved with her father and his family of three daughters and two sons to the far West, crossing the Alleghany Mountains in wagons, and settling at Clarkesburgh, Ohio, in the fall of 1830, residing there five years. As the Eden of their expectations had not been reached, this place was left for amore distant seat in Illinois; and a settlement was made upon a farm near Naples. Here she was afflicted by the death of her father, which occurred June 17, 1837; and she was left to the care of her sisters. At the age of seventeen she was united in marriage to Augustus R. Burbank, the ceremony being celebrated May 1, 1845, at the town of Jacksonville, by the Reverend Chancey Hoberts, at the house of Hicholas and Ann Milburn, – parents of Reverend W.M. Milburn, “the blind man eloquent,” and so often chaplain in Congress. She resided six years of her married life in Naples, and spent two years at Bloomington, Illinois. With her husband...

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