Surname: Buckner

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Viola Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Allen, Charles F. Wf. Libbie; ch. Ray and Fred. P. O. Gray, R. 1. O. 468.64 ac., sec. 7. (40.) Allen, R. L. Wf. Laura. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 160ac., sec. 7. (20.) Owner, Chas. F. Allen. Anderson, Charles. Ch. Jennie, Fred, Frank and John. P. O. Coon Rapids, R. 3. O. 298.41 ac., sec. 1;O. 40 ac., sec. 12. (27.) Anderson, D. B. Wf. Lillie; ch. Bessie, Nellie, Alice, Mary and Hope. P. O. Audubon, R. 2....

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Melville Township

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Anderson, L. A. Wf. Mathilda; ch.Emmert and Lucile. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 160 ac., sec. 36. (18.) Breeder of Poland China Hogs. Andresen, Christ. Wf. Hansena; ch. Mary, Nina, Emil, Estra, Hu1ga and Hannah. P. O. Audubon,R. 3. R. 240 ac., sec. 26. (22.) Owner, H. M. McClanahan. Andrews, James. Wf. Allie; ch. Lois and Harvey. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 160 ac., sec. 28. (37.) Breeder of Poland China Hogs and Holstein Cattle. Arts, John N....

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Lincoln Township

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Ahrendsen, Herman. Wf. Annie; ch. Lawrence, Arthur, Alta. P. O. Manning, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 7; O. 80 ac., sec. 8. (9.) Aikman, Geo. R. Wf. Mae; ch. Ethel M. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 26. (38.) Aikman, R. F. Wf. Jennie; ch. Vera, Floyd, Olive, Donald and Myron. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 24. (34.) Asmus, Fred. Wf. Edith; ch. Dwight, Hazel and Harry. P. O. Audubon, R. 1....

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Cameron Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Aikman, C. M. Wf. Alma. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 160 ac., sec. 6. (26.) Breeder of Short Horn Cattle. Owner, W. F. Aikman. Aikman, W. F. Wf. Nettie; ch. Glen, Fern, Lloyd and Gladys. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 260 ac., sec. 7; R. 240 ac., sec. 8; O. 160 ac., sec. 6. (40.) Breeder of Short Horn Cattle. Owner, J. F. Liken. Albertsen, M. and A. Hansen. P. O. Gray, R. 1.R. 400 ac., sec. 21....

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Biographical Sketch of William B. Blackburn

One of the first resident lawyers of Hopkinsville, and one of the able men of the State, was William B. Blackburn. He came from Woodford County about 1799, a young lawyer just admitted to the bar. He remained four or five years, and during his stay made his home in the family of Bartholomew Wood, the pioneer of Hopkinsville. What his success was while practicing law here is not known, as there is no one here now who knew him then, and it is only through Col. Buckner, of Louisville, who served in the Legislature with him many years later that any facts of him have been obtained. He finally returned to Woodford County probably about 1803, and for years was a prominent lawyer and politician there. He served in the Lower House of the Legislature from 1804 to 1816 inclusive, with the exception of 1808-09-10; and from 1825 to 1828 inclusive. He served in the Senate in 1818-20, 1822-24, and 1832-34, and was an active member throughout his long term of service. He was a brother to Dr. Churchill Blackburn, of Covington, Kentucky, and a cousin of Edward M. Blackburn-the father of ex-Governor, and of Senator Joe Blackburn. He died about 1842 at his home in Woodford...

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Biography of Hon. Joseph B. Crockett

The following sketch was written by Hon. James F. Buckner, of Louisville, for the Kentucky New Era. Col. Buckner was a student of Mr. Crockett, and for several years his law partner, hence no one is better qualified to write an impartial sketch of the man, and he pays a noble tribute to his old friend, partner and preceptor. He says: Joseph B. Crockett, the son of Col. Robert Crockett, was born in 1808, at Union Mills, in Jessamine County, Kentucky, and settled on a farm near Russellville. It was while Col. Crockett was pursuing the vocation of a farmer in Logan County that the son enjoyed the advantages of the tuition of Daniel Comfort, a gentleman who for many years taught a classical school in that vicinity, and to whom many of the most distinguished men of that section were indebted for instruction. In the spring of 1827 he entered the University of Tennessee at Nashville, but in con-sequence of the straitened pecuniary condition of his father he was compelled to leave Nashville after having enjoyed the benefit of the University for less than one year. When only nineteen years of age he came to Hopkinsville and entered upon the study of law in the office of Hon. Charles S. Morehead, who was then one of the most promising young attorneys of the State, and who was rapidly...

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Choctaw Indian Mounds

I read the following in the American Antiquarian over the signature of H. F. Buckner: “Mr. Maxwell, in a historical address, says: My conviction is that the high grade of military skill displayed by the Mound Builders at Carthage, Alabama, attests a know ledge of the necessities of attack and defense unknown to the mode of warfare practiced by the tribes found here by De Soto.” Mr. Maxwell does not state in what respect the high grade of military engineering skill displayed by the Mound Builders at Carthage, Alabama, attests a knowledge of the necessities of attack and defense...

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Slave Narrative of George Washington Buckner

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: Dr. George Washington Buckner Location: Evansville, Indiana Date of Birth: December 1st, 1852 Ex-Slave Stories District #5 Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel A SLAVE, AMBASSADOR AND CITY DOCTOR [DR. GEORGE WASHINGTON BUCKNER] This paper was prepared after several interviews had been obtained with the subject of this sketch. Dr. George Washingtin [TR: Washington] Buckner, tall, lean, whitehaired, genial and alert, answered the call of his door bell. Although anxious to oblige the writer and willing to grant an interview, the life of a city doctor is filled with anxious solicitation for others and he is always expecting a summons to the bedside of a patient or a professional interview has been slated. Dr. Buckner is no exception and our interviews were often disturbed by the jingle of the door bell or a telephone call. Dr. Buckner’s conversation lead in ever widening circles, away from the topic under discussion when the events of his own life were discussed, but he is a fluent speaker and a student of psychology. Psychology as that philosophy relates to the mental and bodily tendencies of the African race has long since become one of the major subjects with which this unusual man struggles. “Why is the negro?” is one of his deepest concerns. Dr. Buckner’s first recollections center within a slave cabin in Kentucky. The cabin was the home of...

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Slave Narrative of Kate Billingsby

Interviewer: Mamie Hanberry Person Interviewed: Kate Billingsby Location: Hopkinsville, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1828 Place of Residence: R.R. #2, Hopkinsville, Ky Kate Billingsby, Ex-slave, according to a record in a Bible the Buckners gave her when she married was born in 1828. She was owned by Frank and Sarah Buckner. Born in this County and has spent her life in and around Hopkinsville. She lives on what is known as the Gates Mill Road about one half mile east of US 41E and owns her own home. Aunt Kate as she is generally called is a small black negro and in going into her home you will find it furnished in lovely antique furniture in a disreputable state of repair. She met me with a dignity and grace that would be a credit to any one of the white race to copy, illiterate though she may be. Her culture and training goes back to the old Buckner family, at one time one of the most cultured families in Christian County. She is not a superstitious negro. Being born a Buckner slave, she was never sold and her manners and ways proclaim that she surely must have been raised in “De white folks house” as she claims, being a maid when old enough, to one of Frank Buckner’s daughters. She stated, “Dese Buckners war sho good to me, eben now...

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Biography of William T. Buckner, Hon.

Hon. William T. Buckner of Wichita was born at Washington Court House, Ohio, January 2, 1846, and secured his early education in the public schools. He was still a lad in his early ‘teens when the Civil war came on, but succeeded in enlisting as a private in Company I, Seventy-third Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which he was in almost constant service at the front. His enlistment had been for three years, but the hard life of the army broke down the young soldier’s health and after two years he was given his honorable discharge because of disability and returned for a while to his home. After his recovery, he again enlisted, this time in Company F, One Hundred and Seventy-fifth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and again went to the front, his service continuing until the close of the war and his final discharge being given him in July, 1865. As a member of two regiments, he was a participant in a number of important engagements in Virginia and in the Southwest, including the battles of McDowell, Cross Keys, Franklin and Nashville, and his record as a soldier was a most honorable one. When his military career was finished, he returned to his home and took up the study of law under the direction of his cousin, Judge Robert M. Briggs, of Washington Court House. After some preparation...

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Biography of Clemence Charles Buckner

An able and efficient public official, faithful and devoted to the interests of the Easthampton Board of Health, and to those of the constabulary with which he is associated, Clemence Charles Buckner has resided in this township nearly all his life, and is known both to industrial and civic affairs as a man of representative citizenship. He is a son of Clemence Buckner, who was born in Coburg, Germany, in 18m, and died April 27, 1871, in Northampton, and whose father was a manufacturer in Germany. Clemence Buckner attended the public schools and college in his native town, and he then went to work in his father’s mill. Coming to America in the fifties, he at first work in the Lancaster Mills at Clinton, Massachusetts, and he was later employed in South Hadley Falls mills as a designer. Removing to Easthampton about 1863, he became an American citizen, and he was employed in the mills of the Glendale Elastic Fabric Company to the time of his death. Clemence Buckner married, in Clinton, Christina Hannah, who was born in Scotland, and died August 22, 1909, at the age of seventy-seven years, daughter of John and Mary (Kennedy) Hannah. Their children: 1. George Stephen, died February 12, 1916; had served as tax collector in Easthampton, was engaged in the real estate and insurance business, and from 1891 to the time of...

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