Surname: Bruner

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Read More

1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – B Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. B...

Read More

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Read More

1921 Farmers Directory of Audubon Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; (), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Allexander, David. Wf. Clara; ch. Alice, Frank and Mable. Anita, R. 1. R. 160 ac., sec. 33. Isabell Duthie. Alt, Wm. Ch. Ruth, Raymond and Marie. P. O. Exira, R. 4. O. 50 ac., sec. 7; O. 275 ac., sec. 8 (8.) Anderson Bros. P. O. Adair, R. 3. R. 80 ac., sec. 12;O. 40 ac., sec. 1. (45.) Owners, G. A. Anderson and Andrew Anderson. Anderson., Chris. Wf. Alvilda; ch.Nels and Elsie. P. O. Exira, R. 4. O. 161.51 ac., sec....

Read More

Slave Narrative of Peter Bruner

Interviewer: Evelyn McLemore Person Interviewed: Peter Bruner Date of Interview: 1936 Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co. Date of Birth: 1845 ESTILL CO. (Evelyn McLemore) Story of Peter Bruner, a former slave: Peter Bruner, was born in Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co., in 1845. His master was John Bell Bruner, who at that time treated him fairly well. When Peter was 10 years of age his master brought him and his sister to Irvine. After arriving in Irvine, Peter’s master was very cruel to him. They got only cornbread, fat meat and water to eat. If his master’s hunger was not satisfied, he would even take this little from them. The[TR:?] were tables to eat from. Once Peter, was taken into his master’s house to nurse the children and was made to sleep on the floor with only a ragged quilt to lie on and one thin one over him. Often he was whipped because his mistress said the washing was not clean, when it was. On one occasion when he was beaten his master took a piece of sole leather about 1 foot long and 2 inches wide, cut it full of holes and dipped it in water that was brined. He then took the leather and lashed the poor slave’s back. Joe Bruner, was a better master to his slaves than John. Once when Peter...

Read More

Biography of Presley M. Bruner

A prominent practitioner at the bar of Hailey, and ex-district attorney of Alturas (now Blaine) County, Idaho, Presley Morris Bruner, was born in Chillicothe, Ohio. September 15, 1850. On the paternal side is of German lineage, and on the maternal of Scotch descent. His father, J. A. Bruner, was born in Virginia, a representative of one of the old and prominent families of that state, living in the Blue mountain region. He married Miss Margaret Morris, a daughter of Judge Presley Morris, of Chillicothe, Ohio. Her father was a descendant of the McDonald clan of the highlands of Scotland, and traced his ancestry back to Mary, Queen of Scots. Mr. Bruner’s father was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, and devoted fifty-six years of his life to spreading the gospel of peace on earth, good will to men. He removed to California in 1856, going by way of the isthmus, and spent the remainder of his days as a member of the California conference. He was a man of scholarly attainments, of marked ability in his chosen calling, a persuasive speaker and a power for good among men. He departed this life in 1892, at the age of seventy years, and his wife passed away three years previously, at the age of sixty-nine. She was to him a most faithful helpmeet, ably assisting him in his work, and...

Read More

Search

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 3,835 other subscribers

It takes a Village to grow a Family Tree!


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Recent Comments

Pin It on Pinterest