Surname: Boyd

Chase Family of Fall River MA

CHASE (Fall River family). The Chase family here considered is strictly speaking a Massachusetts-Rhode Island one, springing as it does from the early Roxbury Yarmouth family, a later generation of which located in Portsmouth, R. I. In the third generation from the immigrant ancestor through Joseph Chase, who located in Swansea, Mass., and Benjamin, who settled in Portsmouth, R. I., have descended the Chases who have come from those respective localities. And both branches have shared largely in the commercial and industrial life of this section of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. From the Portsmouth branch came the late Borden...

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1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – B Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. B Surnames BABBITT, Albert C. (Lucile Meadows) Avon R5 Berwick Sec31 T80a Bion Lincoln (1918) Tels. Greenbush and Avon BABBIT, Edwin (Clara Johnson) Ch Livina, Dale, Albert, Florine, *Ira, *Mary, *Emery,*Homer, *Jessie, *Hobart; Avon R5 Berwick Sec27 T355a H.A. and C.E. Saunders (1901) Tels. Avon and Greenbush BACON, Charles A. (Susie Tate) Ch Ernest, Howard, Charming, Marie; Roseville R2 Pt. Pleasant Sec21 T400a B.P. Lee (1895) Tel. Farmers’ Line Swan...

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Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

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History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery Graham Indiana

This is an historical transcription of Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery, Graham, Jefferson County, Indiana which was transcribed in 1941 as part of the DAR cemetery transcription project. The value of this transcription is that in many cases they transcribed headstones which may today no longer exist. Had it not been for this project these records may have been lost due to the natural regression of cemeteries. Many of the cemeteries may be known by a different name today, we use the name they were identified as in 1941. Arbuckle, J. N., 07 Aug 1837 – 10 Dec 1882 Boyd,...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Sergeant Lent Munson – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity and escape of Sergeant Lent Munson, who fell into the hands of the Western Indians at the time of Lieut. Lowry’s defeat. As Lieut. Lowry and Ensign Boyd, with about one hundred men, were escorting two hundred and fifty pack horses with provisions from fort St. Clair to General Wayne’s camp, (six miles in advance of Fort Jefferson,) they were furiously assailed by about half their number of concealed Indians, and totally defeated. They had encamped four miles on their journey on the night of the 16th of October, 1793, and were sufficiently warned during the whole night of what they had to undergo at early dawn. However, no attack was made until the detachment was about ready to march on the morning of the 17th. At this juncture the Indians rushed upon them with great fury, and after a short but bloody engagement the whites were dispersed in every direction. In this onset Lieut. Lowry and Ensign Boyd both fell mortally wounded, and about twenty of their men were among the slain. The rest of this unfortunate escort, excepting eleven, who were taken prisoners, got back to Fort St. Clair. To the smallness of the number of the Indians is to be attributed the escape of any. Sergeant Munson was one of the eleven prisoners, and was hurried off with his companions towards the...

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English Settlement on the Holsten River

In the meantime, the wild region upon the Cumberland river was explored, and some temporary establishments formed at the bluff, on which is now situated the city of Nashville. Captain James Robertson was the hero of these bold adventures, and had several times, with a small party of men, cut his way from extreme East Tennessee to that country, passing over the lofty Cumberland mountains and through dangerous Indian settlements. Returning to the Holston, after having made several of these trips, he raised a large company of emigrants, and built boats at Long Island. When they were nearly ready to be launched, he placed himself at the head of a horse party, and set out over the mountains for the Cumberland, intending to leave signs upon the trees at the head of the Muscle Shoals, after going from Nashville to that place. These signs he intended for the purpose of letting the voyagers know whether it would be practicable for them to disembark at the Muscle Shoals and go to the Cumberland by land. A large number of flat boats, filled with emigrants and their effects, began the voyage from Long Island, upon the Holston. Those recollected will be mentioned, for the gratification of descendants. The large Donaldson family, who, after reaching the Cumberland, settled upon Stone’s river, and became connected by affinity with General Andrew Jackson, all embarked...

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Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County, Idaho continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence.

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Slave Narrative of Annie B. Boyd

Interviewer: Mamie Hanberry Person Interviewed: Annie B. Boyd Location: Hopkinsville, Kentucky Place of Birth: Christian County, KY Date of Birth: August 22, 1851 Place of Residence: Hopkinsville, Kentucky Annie B. Boyd: [TR: Interviewer’s name also spelled also spelled Hanbery.] Annie B. Boyd, born August 22nd 1851, resides at corner of Liberty and First Street, Hopkinsville, Kentucky. Born a slave belonging to Charles Cammack near Gordonsville, Kentucky in Christian County. “My mother and me war put on de block in front of de Courthouse in Hopkinsville and sold to Mr. Newt. Catlett and we brung $500.00. Marse Catlett lived on the corner of Seventh and Clay Streets, Hopkinsville, Kentucky. Wen I was older the white folks had me foh to nurse dar chilluns. I noes wen de war broke out marse had a store and den marsa took me to his wife’s kinfolks down in de country till freedom war declared den my stepfather come an’ got me. Of course I hed ter work and den I went ter nurse foh Dr. Fairleigh and nussed his daughter Madge. De white folks wont good to me. My marster was a good man but my missus wont no good woman. She uster box my ears, stick pins in me and tie me ter de cedar chest and whoop me as long as she wanter. Oh, how I did hate dat woman. “Yes,...

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Biography of David Milton Boyd

David Milton Boyd, secretary of the Traffic Motor Truck Corporation of St. Louis, was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, August 1, 1878, and is a son of Trustin Brown and Emily (Tousey) Boyd, who are now residents of St. Louis. Their family numbered two sons, the younger being Ingram F., who Is the president of the Boyd-Richardson Men’s Apparel Company of this city. In the acquirement of his education, David Milton Boyd attended Smith Academy of St. Louis, which he entered in 1887, completing his course by graduation in June, 1896. He afterward attended Yale University and won his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1899. He started out in the business world as a representative of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, holding a clerical position with that company until 1901. In the following year he entered the employ of Russell Sage at New Paltz, New York, and in 1900 was made general superintendent of the New Paltz & Poughkeepsie Traction Company, so continuing until 1901. In that year he became general manager of the Shore Line Railway at St. Johns, New Brunswick, where he remained until 1904. During the succeeding five years he was again connected with the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, acting as private secretary to the vice president and later was appointed division freight agent at Newark, New Jersey. With his return to St. Louis Mr....

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