Surname: Boudinot

Biographical Sketch of Richard F. Boudinot

(See Grant, Watie and Adiar.)-Richard Fields, son of William Penn and Caroline M. (Fields) Boudinot, was born June 7, 1856. He married June 8, 1896, Mary Catherine, daughter of James Roe and Rachel Ann (Adair) Treppard, born August 28, 1873. They are the parents of Caroline Mary, born March 22, 1891; Elinor Margaret, born October 25, 1893; Harriet Gold, born November 25, 1897; William Penn, born Nov. 23, 1900; and Rachel Catharine, born Sept. 24, 1903. Mr. and Mrs. Boudinot are residents of Braggs,...

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Biography of Frank J. Boudinot

(See Watie, Grant and Ross)-Frank Josiah, son of William Penn and Caroline (Fields) Boudinot, was born August 20, 1866, in the Cherokee Nation. Educated in Bacone College or Indian University (near Muskogee), Flint High School (Michigan) and University of Michigan. He took a course in law at the University of Michigan in 1894-5-6. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity. His Cherokee name is Kaw-la-nah (Raven) and he belongs to the Cherokee Holly clan. He has been the attorney, counselor and adviser of the Kee-too-wah Society of Cherokees since 1899 and was elected Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation by a Joint session of the National Council on November 21, 1895. He was one of Chief Bushyhead’s Executive Secretaries in 1887, clerk of the Cherokee Supreme Court 1887-89 and was one of the attorneys for the Cherokee Nation before the Dawes Commission in 1896. Under his advice and direction the Eastern Cherokees were organized in 1900 by the Keetoowah Society, which resulted ultimately in the collection of the five million dollar Emigrant Cherokee claim—paid in 1910. Was by act of Congress, Mar. 3, 1919, made special attorney for the Cherokee Nation to prosecute a claim against the United States for interest on the funds which arose out of the judgment in the Emigrant case, the amount claimed being about four million dollars. He married at Fort...

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Biography of Elias P. Boudinot

The subject of this sketch was born January 2, 1854, the son of W. P. Boudinot, a poet and scholar, and brother of the late well-known E. C. Boudinot. Elias is a grandson of the celebrated Elias Boudinot, who was, perhaps, the most illustrious Cherokee of his day. He was almost a full blood, was educated at Cornwall, Connecticut, and there married Miss Harriet Gold, daughter of Rev. B. Gold, a Presbyterian minister, and president of the academy at Cornwall. An account of the tragical death of Elias Boudinot, Sr., will be found in the historical pages of this work. Young Elias’ mother was a member of the Fields family, one of the leading families in the Cherokee Nation. As a pupil of the old Gunnery School, Washington, Connecticut, at the age of eleven years, Elias there went through the ordinary routine of education till his fourteenth year, when he returned to his home in the Indian Territory, and dwelt upon his father’s farm for two years. At the age of sixteen he was apprenticed to the printers’ trade, in the office of the Cherokee Advocate, Tahlequah, and perfected himself in the craft at the establishment of Ennis & Co., St. Louis, at the age of twenty years. Returning to Tahlequah, he took charge of the typographical department of the Advocate. In that office he remained until the fall...

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Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of...

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