Surname: Bond

Ancestors of Horace Alden Keith of Brockton, MA

Horace Alden Keith, founder of the Brockton Webbing Company, one of the successful and thriving industries of Brockton, and one of that city’s enterprising and progressive business men, is a descendant on both his paternal and maternal sides of historic old New England ancestry. Mr. Keith was born in West Bridgewater May 25, 1862, eldest son of the late Henry Snell and Thalia (Alden) Keith. The ancestral line of the branch of the Keith family in this country to which Horace Alden Keith belongs, and which follows, is given in chronological order from the first American ancestor. Rev. James Keith, born in 1644, was educated in Aberdeen, Scotland (as tradition says at the expense of a maiden aunt), where he was graduated likely from Marischal College, his name appearing on the roll of 1657, said college having been founded by George, the fifth Earl of Keith Marischal, in 1593. At the age of eighteen years he emigrated to this country, arriving at Boston in 1662. He was introduced to the church at Bridgewater by Dr. Increase Mather, and became settled as the minister of the Bridgewater Church Feb. 18, 1664. Rev. James Keith passed away in West Bridgewater July 23, 1719, aged seventy-six years, having labored in the ministry of the town for fifty-six years.

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1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – B Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. B Surnames BABBITT, Albert C. (Lucile Meadows) Avon R5 Berwick Sec31 T80a Bion Lincoln (1918) Tels. Greenbush and Avon BABBIT, Edwin (Clara Johnson) Ch Livina, Dale, Albert, Florine, *Ira, *Mary, *Emery,*Homer, *Jessie, *Hobart; Avon R5 Berwick Sec27 T355a H.A. and C.E. Saunders (1901) Tels. Avon and Greenbush BACON, Charles A. (Susie Tate) Ch Ernest, Howard, Charming, Marie; Roseville R2 Pt. Pleasant Sec21 T400a B.P. Lee (1895) Tel. Farmers’ Line Swan...

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Muster Roll of Captain Nathan Barker’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Nathan Barker’s Company of Light Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the sixth day of March, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta Maine, to the twenty-sixth day of March, 1839, when discharged or mustered. Captain Nathan Barker. Lieutenant Ephriam Harmon. Ensign John S. Willson. Sergeants Simon A. Dyer. Benjamin Boothby. Lothrop Worcester. William Proctor. Corporals James W. Stevens. Stephen Swett. S. V. R. G. Brown. Henry Towle. Musicians Thomas Pennell. William Pike. Privates Babb, Joseph...

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Norwich Vermont an Independent Township

In America the germ of political organization is the Township, older than the County, older than the State. In New England we find towns established as independent communities, endowed with distinctive rights and privileges, as early as the middle of the seventeenth century. It is to these town governments that we must look for the foundation of republican liberty, to the town meeting, where all citizens meet on a plane of equality to choose their local officers and manage their local affairs. Here is the firm basis upon which all free institutions can rest. Ralph Waldo Emerson once proposed that the records of a New England town should be printed and presented to the governments of Europe, to the English nation as a thank-offering and as a certificate of the progress of the Saxon race; to the continental nations as a lesson of humanity and love. De Tocqueville said that the government of a New England township was the best specimen of a pure democracy that the world has ever seen. The town charters granted by New Hampshire conferred upon the inhabitants of each township, from its first organization, the right of self-government in town meeting, by the election of town officers and general ejection of town affairs. Such, also, had long been the practice in Connecticut, from whence a large proportion of all the early settlers had immigrated...

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Biography of George S. Bond

George S. Bond, a manufacturer of Charlestown, was born in that town, March 2, 1837, son of Silas and Alice (Abbot) Bond. His grandfather, William Bond, who was born in Watertown, Mass., at the age of twenty years came to Charlestown, and thereafter carried on general farming during the remainder of his active life. One of his six children was Silas Bond, who married Alice Abbot, and also was the father of six children, including the subject of this sketch. George S. Bond was educated in the district schools of the town. At the age of seven years his father died. When about nine years old he went to Fall River, where he worked for two years. After his return to Charlestown he worked on various farms in Charlestown and Acworth for about five years. He subsequently went to Brockton, Mass., learned the shoe finishing business, and remained there until he was eighteen years of age. He then went to Syracuse, N.Y., where he worked at bis trade for two years. In 1856 he returned to Charlestown and took up the tinsmith trade. He then went to Putney, Vt., where he worked for four years. In 1865 he bought out the tin store of W. B. Downer, and afterward carried it on for fifteen years. On retiring from that business, he bought out the violin case manufactory that had...

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Slave Narrative of Hula Williams

Person Interviewed: Hula Williams Place of Birth: Arkansas Date of Birth: July 18, 1857 My mammy use to belong to the Burns plantation back in old Mississippi; that was before I was born, but the white overseer, a man named Kelly, was my father, so my mammy always said. She stayed with the Burns’ until her Master’s daughter married a man named Bond and moved to Jefferson County, Arkansas, about 25 miles south of Little Rock. The old Master give mammy and two other slaves to the girl when she married, that’s how come mammy to be in Arkansas when I was born, in 1857. The record says July 18. Mammy was named Emmaline and after she got to Arkansas she married one of the Bond slaves, George Washington Bond. My step-father told me one time that Master Bond tell him to get some slippery-elm bark, but step-paw forget it. And it seem like the Master done forgot it too, but on the next Sunday morning he called out for step-pappy. “Come here,” he said. “I’m going to give you a little piece of remembrance!” That was a good flogging, and some of the white neighbors look on and laugh. But there was one slave, Boyl Green, who lived on a plantation nearby that my husband told me about after we was married. That Negro said he never would...

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Biographical Sketch of Doctor Franklin Bond

Bond, Doctor Franklin, Cornwall, was born in Cornwall, Addison county, Vt,, on April 15, 1821. He was a son of Asa and Lucy (Janes) Bond. Asa Bond was born in Chelsea, Orange county, Vt. He came to Addison county about 1811, and in 1812 he purchased a portion of the place which is now owned by his son, Franklin Bond. He was a tanner and currier by trade, a business which he followed for many years. He had a family of eight children, six of whom are now living. The latter part of his life he devoted entirely to farming. His death occurred in February, 1868. Doctor Franklin Bond was educated in the common schools. He was brought up to farming and the tanning business, which he followed until twenty years of age, when he attended an academy at Brandon, Vt. He also took a partial scientific course at Middlebury College, and was at Dartmouth College one year, taking the medical course there; was at the Castleton Medical College for two years, and graduated from that institution in 1847. He commenced the practice of medicine with his preceptor, Doctor M. O. Porter, with whom he studied in Cornwall, Vt., previous to his graduation, after which he went to Sheboygan Falls, Wis., and there practiced medicine for about eleven years, after which he returned to the home place to take...

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Biography of H. Wheeler Bond, M. D.

Dr. H. Wheeler Bond, a St. Louis physician and surgeon, comes from a family that has left many distinguished names upon the records of the medical profession in America. His ancestral line can be traced back to Dr. Thomas Bond who was the progenitor of the family in the new world and who later founded the first school of medicine in the United States. This was established in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which city has always been a center of medical learning. The records show that Dr. Thomas Bond came to this country from England with a nephew, John Bond, who studied medicine and surgery under him in Philadelphia. This Dr. John Bond at the outbreak of troubles between the French colonies of Canada and the British colonies along the Atlantic, joined a Pennsylvania regiment and was with General Braddock in the French and Indian war, in which he was taken prisoner and was for a time incarcerated at Fort Duquesne, which is now the city of Pittsburgh. He was afterward taken by the Indians to Canada. In recognition of his service to the chief’s son he was given his freedom. After his return home he again entered upon active military professional duty in the British Colonial army. At the outbreak of the Revolutionary war his sympathies were entirely with the colonies, so he resigned from the British service, but owing...

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Biography of John Alexander Bond

John A. Bond. Among the family names that have been known and respected for more than a half century in Shawnee County, is that of Bond. Industrious, honorable, intelligent and religious, the Bonds have helped in every way the development of this section and have reflected credit on both family and community. John Alexander Bond, the present leading representative of the family and its pioneer settler in Kansas, now lives in comfortable retirement on his fine farm situated in Rossville Township. John Alexander Bond was born in Virginia, May 20, 1834, the eldest of his parents’ seven children. He is a son of Thomas and Margaret (Ireland) Bond, both of whom were born in Virginia. The paternal grandfather of Mr. Bond came from England to the United States and landed at Baltimore, Maryland, later removing to Virginia, and was a planter there. The maternal grandfather probably was born in Ireland. He was discovered as a stowaway child, on a sailing vessel bound for America and as he was too young to remember his real name he was called Ireland by those who first cared for him and this name he later adopted and lived to honor it. In the course of time he became a substantial farmer in Virginia, married there and reared an estimable family. His daughter, Margaret Ireland, became the wife of Thomas Bond. Mr. Bond and...

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Biography of William Henry Bond

William Henry Bond came up the Missouri River in 1865 to the City of Leavenworth and founded the wholesale grocery establishment of Bond & Funk. Though now living retired with home in Kansas City, Missouri, Mr. Bond had been more or less vitally and closely identified with Leavenworth’s welfare and progress for half a century. He was born in the State of Missouri at Weston on July 19, 1840. His parents, William H. and Mary (Hitchcock) Bond, arrived in Missouri when it was on the western frontier. His father was a miner by occupation. Mr. Bond is a direct descendant of Joseph Bond who came from England in 1721 and settled in Pennsylvania. He was a Quaker. Part of Mr. Bond’s youth was spent in New Orleans but for the most part he was reared in St. Louis, where he received his early education. At St. Louis on April 21, 1862, he married Miss Josephine Fisher. It was three years after his marriage that he became a resident of Leavenworth. He continued in business as a wholesale grocery merchant for nine years, and after that had many diverse business interests and was also closely connected with the community’s affairs. He was a pronounced republican in politics and was allied with the organization from the time of the Civil war. In 1872 he was elected a member of the Kansas...

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