Surname: Blood

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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Biographical Sketch of Rear-Admiral George A. Converse

Born at Norwich, May 13, 1844, son of Dr. Shubael and Louvia (Merrill) Converse; was a cadet at Norwich University from 1859 to 1861; graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy in 1864, with the highest honors in a class of 64 members; attached to the European squadron, 1865- ’69, 1870-9 and 1883-85; instructor at the torpedo station at Newport, R. I.; in command of the U. S. S. Montgomery during the war with Spain; now chief of the bureau of navigation, U. S. Navy. He married Laura Shelby Blood, daughter of Henry and Laura (Shelby) Blood, to whom were born several daughters. Admiral Converse‘s great ability in his chosen profession has received merited recognition from his brother...

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History of the Industries of Norwich VT

Although the products of the industries in Norwich have not been of great magnitude they have been quite varied in character. Such information in regard to these callings as we have been able to obtain we will present to our readers, though not in strict chronological order. Among the earliest establishments coming under this head was a grist mill established as early as 1770, by Hatch and Babcock on Blood Brook, on or near the site of the grist mill now operated by J. E. Willard, a short distance up the stream from where it empties into the Connecticut...

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History of Norwich Vermont Education

From the town records it appears that the first attempt to divide the town into school districts, was at a town meeting held November 19, 1782, when John Slafter, Elijah Brownson, Ithamar Bartlett, Joseph Loveland, Paul Bingham, Joseph Hatch, Daniel Baldwin, Abel Wilder and Samuel Brown, Jr., were made a committee for that purpose. Soon thereafter the committee reported that they “could effect nothing on the business of their appointment,” and were discharged. No further move in town meeting towards districting the town for school purposes appears to have been made until March 30, 1785, when, on petition of...

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that...

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Biography of Albert C. Blood

Albert C. Blood, who in 1904, organized the Maplewood Planing Mill Company, of which he has since been the president, has thus been connected with the manufacturing interests of St. Louis for seventeen years. He was born in Fulton county, Illinois, February 26, 1852. His father, Joseph P. Blood, was a native of New Hampshire and about 1850 removed to Illinois, settling in Fulton county, near Lewistown, where he engaged in the operation of a grist and saw-mill and also in stock raising. He married Elizabeth A. Ogden, a native of Indiana, who removed with her parents to Illinois, where her people were large land owners. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Blood was celebrated in Illinois, and they became the parents of three sons And three daughters, of whom Albert C. is the oldest. The father died in 1877, while the mother survived until 1884. Albert C. Blood was educated in the public schools of Henry, Illinois, and started out in the business world with the United States Express Company as a messenger between St. Louis and Chicago. He was employed for six years, after which he had various positions with manufacturers of farm machinery in Peoria. He then came to St. Louis and learned the cabinet-maker’s trade and in 1904 organized the Maplewood Planing Mill Company, of which he is the president. They do a...

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Biography of Hollis Lemuel Blood

Hollis Lemuel Blood, a well-to-do farmer and dairyman of Bradford, Merrimack County, N.H., was born July 16, 1845, in Goshen, Sullivan County, this State, a son of Lemuel and Eliza (Dodge) Blood. On the paternal side he is of Scotch ancestry and on the maternal of English. His paternal grandfather served throughout the Revolutionary War, and in later life was always called General Blood. After the war he removed from Maine to New Hampshire, locating on Blood Hill in Bradford Centre, his son Moody, who later settled in the South, coming here with him. The General subsequently made his home with his son Lemuel in Goshen, living there until his death. Lemuel came from Maine to New Hampshire at the time his father did, but located Goshen, taking up a tract of three hundred acres of wild land, from which he redeemed a farm. He was three times married, his first and second wives, named Bates, having been sisters. He had by his three unions twenty-one children, his last wife, formerly Miss Eliza Dodge, being the mother of five, namely: George F., who served in the war of the Rebellion, taking part in three of the hardestfought battles-Antietam, South Mountain, and another-and died a few years later from the effects of wounds received at the battle of South Mountain; Hollis L., the subject of this sketch; Jeannette, wife of...

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