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Surname: Blair

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – B Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. B Surnames BABBITT, Albert C. (Lucile Meadows) Avon R5 Berwick Sec31 T80a Bion Lincoln (1918) Tels. Greenbush and Avon BABBIT, Edwin (Clara Johnson) Ch Livina, Dale, Albert, Florine, *Ira, *Mary, *Emery,*Homer, *Jessie, *Hobart; Avon R5 Berwick Sec27 T355a H.A. and C.E. Saunders (1901) Tels. Avon and Greenbush BACON, Charles A. (Susie Tate) Ch Ernest, Howard, Charming, Marie; Roseville R2 Pt. Pleasant Sec21 T400a B.P. Lee (1895) Tel. Farmers’ Line Swan...

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Descendants of John Ames of West Bridgewater MA

The Ames surname is of early English origin, and the family living at Bristol bore the following coat of arms: Argent, on a bend cotised sable, three roses of the field. Motto: Fama Candida rosa dulcior. Crest: A white rose. (I) John Ames was buried at Bruton, Somersetshire, England, in 1560. (II) John Ames (2), son of John, died in 1583; married Margery Crome. Children: John Ames. Launcelot Ames. William Ames. (III) John Ames (3), son of John (2), born in 1560, died in 1629, married Cyprian Browne. Children: William Ames. John Ames, went to New England, settling first...

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1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East...

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Mission’s Among the Southern Indians

In the year 1819 the Synod of South Carolina resolved to establish a mission among the Southern Indians east of the Mississippi river. The Cherokees, Muskogee’s, Seminoles, Choctaws and Chickasaws then occupied Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Rev. David Humphries offered to take charge of the intended mission. He was directed to visit the Indians, obtain their consent and select a suitable location. Rev. T. C. Stewart, then a young licentiate, offered himself as a companion to Mr. Humphries. They first visited the Muskogee’s (Creeks), who, in a council of the Nation, declined their proposition. They then traveled through...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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War With The Modoc – Indian Wars

Early April 16th, the Modoc had a big fire in their camp. Major Thomas dropped a shell directly into it, provoking a frantic war whoop, and causing the sudden extinguishing of the fire. Another shell was dropped in the same locality, and was followed by yells of pain and dismay. The Modoc then appeared and challenged the soldiers to come out and fight. Another shell was the answer, and they were driven back. At 4 o’clock A. M. , after another fight, the Modoc gave up the attempt to break through the line and retired. Scattering shots were fired on the...

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Letter from John Blair to Thomas D. Love

Letter from John Blair to Thomas D. Love Washington City, 3rd February, 1829. Dear Sir: Yours of the 20th, last month came to hand, to which I hasten to reply. You ask for information respecting the mode to be adopted in taking the next Census; and for my aid in procuring for you that appointment in Carter County. As to the inquiry, I can say the bill has not passed. Many members think it ought not at this term. I believe it should and that old mose of taking it is decidedly best. I am in favor of leaving responsibility and holding on to the person thus responsible. Some think the members of Congress best acquainted in their Districts, and, of course, the proper persons to give those appointments. On that plan you can easily see that there would be no regularity-no head to give the proper instructions, so as to procure uniformity and be responsible for such rules and regulations: hence I say the Marshalls should take the Census, and be responsible for their deputies or agents. The Present Marshall, Calloway, is an Administration man “and goes by the board”, when Jackson comes into Office. Therefore, I do not think it expedient before the passage of the law to send you a recommendation to a man, who must go out before the appointment is to be made. As...

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Letter from Thomas D. Love to John Blair

Letter from Thomas D. Love to John Blair Dear Sir: Elizabethton, Tenn, Jan. 20th, 1829. I have discerned from the newspapers Fifth Census, or enumeration of the people is about to be taken. What method will be adopted by Congress for taking, has not appeared in the papers that I take. Should a different plan be thought advisable by Congress to take the enumeration, than the old method of taking it, towit: by the marshals of the different states under the instructions of the Secretary of the United States, and the authority of doing it be place in other, men, then, in that event, I would take it as a particular favor that you would aid me by your influence to procure me and office in that business, if you should think I am capable and worthy of such an appointment; but should the old method be sanctioned by the wisdom of Congress, which it likely will be the case, than as I presume you are acquainted with the men of East Tennessee, I would be very thankful if you would give my your assistance to procure me the Office of this County of Carter for that purpose. Perhaps, you could get H. White to aid you in the business, as I should suppose his influence would be of great benefit in that case, as he must be acquainted...

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Note Sent by Robert Love to Thomas D. Love

Copy of a note sent by Robert Love to Thomas D. Love and is self explanatory. “I paid $31 into the hands of John Blair 12th, July 1825 to be given over to Aaron Finch in payment of a note and proven out W.K. Vance had of J.B. Love, with which I left a letter from W.K. Vance to said Finch that he would pay all costs that he might claim on the same. Now do you get these papers from J. Blair or Finch for me. 20th of Sept. 1826 R....

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John Blair

Note: I copy now from “Thirty Years in the United State Senate” by Thomas H. Benton, then Senator from Missouri. John Blair was elected to Congress from the First District of Tennessee in the year 1826, as also was John Bell, David Crockett and James K. Polk. In 1828, the same gentlemen with others serves as Representatives from this said State; also in the year 1831, and voted against the renewing of the charter of the Bank of the United States; Blair, Bell, Crockett and Polk were again elected in 1833-this was Blair’s and Crockett’s last term. Blair went to Missouri, and afterwards became Representative from that State for several years, and then United States Senator. he died in Missouri and left quite a posterity there. The history of Missouri would not be complete without the history of John Blair, nor would that of Tennessee without the history of Bell and the same Blair.-F.D....

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Genealogy of the Cherokee Blair Family

Instructions on how to interpret this information 11 Quatie.   Jonathan Blythe 1112 Sarah George Blair 2 Nannie Blythe. George Blair 3 James Blythe* 111213 James Blair* 2 Elizabeth Blair. John Lowrey 3 Lewis Blair. Polly Benge* and 4 Catherine Blair. _____McCuen 5 Lucy Blair. Samuel Houston Benge 6 Amy Blair* 7 Margaret Blair. Obediah Benge 8 Jonathan Blair* 9 Charles Blair* 10 Thomas Blair. Margaret Sanders 11 Sallie Blair* 12 Susannah Blair* 13 Eliza Blair. George Washington Baldridge 14  Mary Blair. Albert Johnson 15 Bettie Blair. Robert E....

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Slave Narrative of Emoline Satterwhite

Interviewer: G. Leland Summer Person Interviewed: Emoline Satterwhite Date of Interview: May 19, 1937 Location: Newberry, South Carolina “I am bad-sick woman, in bed and can’t hardly talk and can’t ‘member much. I was born near Broad River in de Blair section. I belonged in slavery to de Blair family. My mudder and papa was Grace and Samuel Blair, and dey belonged to Capt. Blair. When dey was sold, I was put in de house wid a good free nigger woman to raise me and to stay ’till de war was over. Den I come to de Blair house, and helped around de house. My sisters could card, spin and weave, and I helped dem wid it. I didn’t have but one dress. When it got dirty, I went down to de creek and washed it and put it against de lims to dry, but I had to put it back on before it got good dry. “When I got old enough, I worked in de field, hoeing and picking...

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Biographical Sketch of G.G. Blair

L.G. Blair, photographer, was born in Ill.; moved to Wis. when quite young, and in 1876 moved to Denison, Iowa. He came to Ida grove in 1879, and established business. He has a branch establishment at Odebolt; is prepared to do first-class work at low...

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Biography of Joseph C. Blair

JOSEPH C. BLAIR. The success which has attended the efforts of Mr. Blair in the various occupations he has filled is by no means a matter of chance, nor was he in any sense an especial favorite of fortune, for when he started out in life for himself he began near the bottom of the ladder. In his case fortune smiled upon him as an agriculturist and as a public official because of his untiring efforts, his close and intelligent application to his duties, and his uprightness and honesty, which should bring success under any circumstances and in any field of labor. Mr. Blair is now the genial, courteous and capable county collector of Taney County, Missouri, and was born in Harlan County, Kentucky, at the headwaters of the Cumberland River, June 22, 1848. He was the eldest but one of a family of nine children born to Absalom and Nancy (Campbell) Blair. The father was also a native of Harlan County, Kentucky, born in 1816, and the son of Joseph Blair, who was a native of North Carolina. The latter married in North Carolina, and he and wife were early set-tlers of Kentucky, in which State he lived to a good old age, engaged in tilling the soil. Absalom Blair became a farmer in his native county, and there passed his entire life, dying in 1886. He was...

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