Select Page

Surname: Beavers

Slave Narrative of Jane Montgomery

Person Interviewed: Jane Montgomery Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Homer, Louisiana Date of Birth: March 15, 1857 Age: 80 I was born March 15, 1857, in Homer, Louisiana. I claim to be 75 years old, but that’s jest my way of counting. My mother was Sarah Strong and my father was Edmond Beavers. We lived in a log cabin that had jest one door. I had two sisters named Peggy and Katie. Mammy was bought from the Strong family and my pappy was bought from Beavers by Mister Eason. We slept on wooden slabs which was jest make-shift beds. I didn’t do no work in slave times ’cause I was too little. You jest had to be good and husky to work on that place. I listened and told mammy everything I heerd. I ate right side dat old white woman on the flo’. I was a little busy-body. I don’t recollect eating in our quarters on Sunday and no other time. I don’t remember no possums and rabbits being on our place, ’cause when white folks killed a chicken for their selves, dey killed one for the niggers. My pappy never ate no cornbread in all his put-together. Meat was my favorite food. I never ate no dry bread without no meat. We wore homespun clothes. My first pair of shoes was squirrel skin. Mammy had...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of John W. Beavers

John W. Beavers, deceased; was born in Hampshire Co., Va., Sept. 3, 1814; he married Miss Mary A. Madden Sept. 10, 1840; she was born in Hampshire Co., Va., March 26, 1819; they had seven children, six living – Samuel M., John B., Richard R., George W., Marcellus S. and Mary E. He lived in Virginia until 1854, when he moved to Illinois, and settled about one-fourth of a mile west of the present village of Humbolt; in 1856, he moved to Iowa, and in 1857 he came to the present place; he was one of the first Road Commissioners in this township under organization; he also held the office of Supervisor for a number of years; he lived on the present place until his death, April 14, 1875. Mrs. Beavers and family all live here on the old homestead. All the children are single except Marcellus S., who married Miss Sallie A. Nicholson, of Humbolt Tp., Feb. 23,...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Matthias Beavers

Matthias Beavers, farmer; P. O. Hutton; was born in Meade Co., Ky., June 6, 1823; his parents, William and Nancy, came to Clay Co., Ind., while he was an infant, and settled near Bowling Green, and after remaining there some six or seven years, came to Clark Co., and lived in the ” Rich Woods,” near Westfield, and about the year 1833, came to Coles Co. Mr. Beavers remained with his parents up to the age of 21, when he married Miss Elizabeth Endsley, daughter of Andrew Endsley, of Hutton Tp., on Jan. 2, 1845; shortly after, he came to his present farm on Sec. 13, where he at present resides; he owns 180 acres, mostly improved. Mr. Beavers remembers well when the Indians were encamped near the cabins of the settlers, and was present when they took up their march at the call of Black Hawk. His wife was born Oct. 8, 1820; they had nine children, six living – Albert, born Oct. 15, 1845; Matilda J. (now Mrs. R. Bennett, of Clark Co.), born Sept. 7, 1848; Isabel (now Mrs. Andrew Lee, of Clark Co.), born Aug. 28, 1850; Nancy E., born April 24, 1854; Sarah C. (now Mrs. Owen Lee, of Hutton Tp.), born Oct. 15, 1856, and Louis R., born May 1,1860, and three boys, who died in infancy. His son Albert enlisted in the...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of William Beavers

William Beavers, farmer; P. O. Hutton; is one of the pioneers of this county, and was born in Loudoun Co., Va., on 23d day of July, 1797; at the age of 17, he left home, driving a team to Barren Co., Ky., remaining there for four or five years. In the year 1818, he married Miss Nancy Bradenburg (daughter of Henry Bradenburg), and after remaining at the home of her parents one year, rented a farm for one year, and, in 1820, went to Clay Co., Ind., remaining there for seven years; in 1827, he came to Clark Co., Ill., near Westfield, and lived there for three years, and, in the year 1830, entered and moved upon the land upon which he now resides, on Sec. 10, near the village of Salisbury; he owns eighty acres. Mr. Beavers first built a log cabin, with a “puncheon floor.” The Kickapoo Indians at that time owned this land and lived all around him; while cutting some ” bee-trees ” in Long Point, this county, he saw the ” runners ” that had been sent by Black Hawk calling the Indians together. Mr. Beavers is remarkably active at his time of life, now being in his 82d year; his mother died in Virginia while he was an infant, and his father in Locust Grove, Adams Co., Ohio, where he had moved some...

Read More

Search

Genealogy Specials and Codes

Access Genealogy is the largest free genealogy website not owned by Ancestry.com. As such, it relies on the revenue from commercial genealogy companies such as Ancestry and Fold3 to pay for the server and other expenses related to producing and warehousing such a large collection of data. If you're considering joining either of these programs, please join from our pages, and help support free genealogy online!


Free Shipping with DNA Kit Purchase! Use Code: FREESHIPDNA


40% Off -
Special Offer for Fold3


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest