Surname: Barnett

1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – B Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. B Surnames BABBITT, Albert C. (Lucile Meadows) Avon R5 Berwick Sec31 T80a Bion Lincoln (1918) Tels. Greenbush and Avon BABBIT, Edwin (Clara Johnson) Ch Livina, Dale, Albert, Florine, *Ira, *Mary, *Emery,*Homer, *Jessie, *Hobart; Avon R5 Berwick Sec27 T355a H.A. and C.E. Saunders (1901) Tels. Avon and Greenbush BACON, Charles A. (Susie Tate) Ch Ernest, Howard, Charming, Marie; Roseville R2 Pt. Pleasant Sec21 T400a B.P. Lee (1895) Tel. Farmers’ Line Swan...

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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Biography of Alfred F. Barnett

Alfred F. Barnett was born in Mercer County, Kentucky, November 23,1816, and lived there two years, when his parents, Zacharius and Nancy Burnett, migrated to Missouri and settled near Fayette, Howard County. There he was reared, and lived until 1847, when he removed to Daviess county and settled on a farm in Jefferson township, continuing in agricultural pursuits for two years. In 1849 he came to Gallatin and engaged in the mercantile business with R. S. Owings, under the firm name of Barnett & Owings, and continued in the business until the summer of 1851, when he retired from the firm, and, for a short time, again engaged in farming. He next went to Smithton, Kansas, and was the manager of a store at that place for the firm of Holt, Tipton & Co., of Savannah, Missouri, remaining there until 1857, when he returned to Gallatin and was appointed deputy sheriff by James J. Minor, holding the position four years. In 1861 he joined the Confederate army, enlisting in General Sterling Price’s brigade as a private, and served during the war, returning to Gallatin after the declaration of peace in 1865. His first employment was the running of a steam flouring-mill for R. T. West, in which business he was engaged up to 1874, when he was elected treasurer of Daviess county, reelected in 1876, serving both terms and...

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Slave Narrative of Ned Thompson

Grandfather was a Alabama slave. His master had a lot of boys who were named Tom so as Grandfather took care of the cows all the time when he was a boy they started to calling him “Cow Tom” when they wanted him. Each boy called according to his work to keep them all from answering. That name stayed with Grandfather all his life. When the agreement was made to sell the land in Alabama for land here he was forced to follow his master to see if the land was suitable to trade. That trip was made two years prior to the immigration. There were no towns but they crossed the Arkansas River Southwest of Ft. Smith on horseback, then went southeast of Checotah, due northwest to North Fork, and then on South. As they were going northwest they passed a high hill and saw some birds flying toward them. He thought there must be water up there and the birds had been there to drink but others said it was too high a hill to have water on top of it. They went to see and found a spring that had been chopped out before 1832. It is thought that some Mexicans had chopped out the spring as they came through going South as they explored clear to Ft. Sill. Grandfather then returned to Alabama and sent...

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Biography of Raymond Griffin Barnett

Raymond Griffin Barnett, who had the well earned title of captain of the American army in the World war and who is now engaged in the practice of law in Kansas City, was born at Carthage, Hancock county, Illinois, October 8, 1882, and is a son of Fred P. and Adele (Griffin) Barnett, the former a native of Missouri and the latter of Illinois. The father went from this state to Iowa and afterward returned to Kansas City. He is by profession a court reporter and is now the vice president of the Shorthand Reporting Company, with offices in the Temple building of Kansas City. To him and his wife were born three children but one has passed away, the surviving daughter being Edith Barnett. After completing a course in the Central high school of Kansas City, Raymond G. Barnett attended the University of Missouri and then went to the coast, where he entered the Stanford University of California, winning his Bachelor of Arts degree as a member of the class of 1905. Subsequently he studied law there and in 1906 was admitted to the bar of Kansas City, where he has since engaged in practice. He is thorough in his work, energetic in his tasks and capable in handling the legal business entrusted to his care. His professional career is characterized by the thorough preparation of his cases...

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Slave Narrative of Lizzie Barnett

Interviewer: Mrs. Rosa B. Ingram Person Interviewed: Lizzie Barnett Location: Conway, Arkansas Age: 100? “Yes; I was born a slave. My old mammy was a slave before me. She was owned by my old Miss, Fanny Pennington, of Nashville, Tennessee. I was born on a plantation near there. She is dead now. I shore did love Miss Fanny. “Did you have any brothers and sisters, Aunt Liz.?” “Why, law yes, honey, my mammy and Miss Fanny raised dey chillun together. Three each, and we was jes’ like brothers and sisters, all played in de same yard. No, we did not eat together. Dey sot us niggers out in de yard to eat, but many a night I’se slept with Miss Fanny. “Mr. Pennington up and took de old-time consumption. Dey calls it T.B. now. My mammy nursed him and took it from him and died before Mr. Abe Lincoln ever sot her free. “I have seen hard times, Miss, I shore have. “In dem days when a man owned a plantation and had children and they liked any of the little slave niggers, they were issued out to ’em just like a horse or cow. “‘Member, honey, when de old-time war happened between the North and South, The Slavery War. It was so long ago I just can ‘member it. Dey had us niggers scared to death of the Bluejackets. One day...

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Slave Narrative of Spencer Barnett

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Spencer Barnett (blind) Location: Holly Grove, Arkansas Age: 81 Occupation: Brakeman on freight train, Farmed, Worked in timber, He sold “shuck mats” and “bottomed” chairs “I was born April 30, 1856. It was wrote in a old Bible. I am 81 years old. I was born 3 miles from Florence, Alabama. The folks owned us was Nancy and Mars Tom Williams. To my recollection they had John, William, and Tom, boys; Jane, Ann, Lucy, and Emma, girls. In my family there was 13 children. My parents name Harry and Harriett Barnett. “Mars Tom Williams had a tanning yard. He bought hides this way: When a fellow bring hides he would tan em then give him back half what he brought. Then he work up the rest in shoes, harness, whoops, saddles and sell them. The man all worked wid him and he had a farm. He raised corn, cotton, wheat, and oats. “That slavery was bad. Mars Tom Williams wasn’t cruel. He never broke the skin. When the horn blowed they better be in place. They used a twisted cowhide whoop. It was wet and tied, then it mortally would hurt. One thing you had to be in your place day and night. It was confinin’. “Sunday was visiting day. “One man come to dinner, he hit a horse wid a rock and...

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Slave Narrative of Josephine Ann Barnett

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Location: De Valls Bluff, Arkansas Age: 75 or 80 “I do not knows my exact age. I judge I somewhere between 75 and 80 years old. I was born close to Germantown, Tennessee. We belong, that is my mother, to Phillip McNeill and Sally McNeill. My mother was a milker. He had a whole heap of hogs, cattle and stock. That not all my mother done. She plowed. Children done the churnin’. “The way it all come bout I was the onliest chile my mother had. Him and Miss Sallie left her to help gather the crop and they brought me in the buggy wid them. I set on a little box in the foot of the buggy. It had a white umbrella stretched over it. Great big umbrella run in between them. It was fastened to the buggy seat. When we got to Memphis they loaded the buggy on the ship. I had a fine time coming. When we got to Bucks Landing we rode to his place in the buggy. It is 13 miles from here (De Valls Bluff). In the fall nearly all his slaves come out here. Then when my mother come on. I never seen my papa after I left back home [TR: Crossed out: (near Germantown)]. My father belong to Boston Hack. He wouldn’t sell and Mr. McNeill wouldn’t...

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Slave Narrative of John W. H. Barnett

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Location: Marianna, Arkansas Age: 81 “I was born at Clinton Parish, Louisiana. I’m eighty-one years old. My parents and four children was sold and left six children behind. They kept the oldest children. In that way I was sold but never alone. Our family was divided and that brought grief to my parents. We was sold on a block at New Orleans. J.J. Gambol (Gamble?) in north Louisiana bought us. After freedom I seen all but one of our family. I don’t recollect why that was. “For three weeks steady after the surrender people was passing from the War and for two years off and on somebody come along going home. Some rode and some had a cane or stick walking. Mother was cooking a pot of shoulder meat. Them blue soldiers come by and et it up. I didn’t get any I know that. They cleaned us out. Father was born at Eastern Shore, Maryland. He was about half Indian. Mother’s mother was a squaw. I’m more Indian than Negro. Father said it was a white man’s war. He didn’t go to war. Mother was very dark. He spoke a broken tongue. “We worked on after freedom for the man we was owned by. We worked crops and patches. I didn’t see much difference then. I see a big change come out of it....

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Biographical Sketch of William Barnett

William Barnett, farmer, P. O. Ionia, was born in Bourbon County, Ky., July 8, 1824. Removed to Vermillion County, Ill. Came to Jewell County, Kan., in 1871, and took a homestead, and is now the owner of 320 acres of land. Held the office of School Treasurer for nine years last past. Was married in Vermillion County, Ill., September 17, 1851, to Miss A. J. Walston, now deceased. Was married a second time in Edwards County, Ill., in December 1856, to Miss Nancy Barnett. He is the father of four children – Susan J., Robert, Martha E. and Lolie. Mr. Barnett is one of Jewell County’s best and most respected citizens, and has done much toward the up building of the...

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Barnett, Anna Lee – Obituary

Enterprise, Oregon Anna Lee Barnett Anna Lee Barnett, 81, of Walla Walla and formerly of Enterprise died Sept. 20 at her home. Herring Groseclose Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Mrs. Barnett was born April 3, 1924, to Bert and Tula Dean Gibson Wingfield in Joseph. She attended high school and married William H. Barnett. They lived in Enterprise where she worked for the First Interstate bank of Oregon for 30 years. She retired in 1986. They traveled for several years before moving to Walla Walla. She enjoyed gardening, sewing, hand work and being with her family. Survivors include children, Gary Price of Milton-Freewater, and Bernie R. Stein of Chicago, Ill.; a step-daughter, Donna Riemer of Spokane; 12 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren and a brother, Raymond Wingfield of Eugene. Her husband, two sons, Linn Price and Jerry L. Stein, an infant sister and other siblings, W.C. Wingfield and Arlene Ingram. The Observer, Obituaries for the week ending Sept. 24, 2005 – Published: September 23,...

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Barnett, Louis – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Louie E. Barnett Jr., 58, of La Grande died May 31 at his home. Private family services will be held at a later date. Loveland Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Observer – Obituaries May 31 – June 5, 2004 Published: July 1,...

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