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Surname: Banks

Biographies of Western Nebraska

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and...

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Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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Muster Roll of Captain Samuel Burrell’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Samuel Burrell’s Company of Infantry in Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous Augusta, Maine, to the nineteenth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

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Andrew Ayers Martin’s DNA Results

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Andrew Ayers Martin (Cherokee) I would be happy to share these profiles with Dennis. I am attaching the initial analysis on my DNA done at Ancestry as well as the breakdowns done on the FTDNA results by analysis at GedMatch. The proportions of Middle Eastern and Mediterranean DNA are relatively stable. Some others not related to me whose families have traditions of being part Cherokee show similar percentages. The stable proportions are consistent with the Hardy Weinburg principle of biology. Only my uncle [kit 185473] shows...

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Narrative of the captivity of Alexander Henry, Esq – Indian Captivities

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Narrative of the captivity of Alexander Henry, Esq., who, in the time of Pontiac’s War, fell into the hands of the Huron Indians. Detailing a faithful account of the capture of the Garrison of Michilimacki-Nac, and the massacre of about ninety people. Written by himself. 1Mr. Henry was an Indian trader in America for about sixteen years. He came to Canada with the army of General Amherst, and previous to his being made prisoner by the Indians experienced a variety of fortune. His narrative, as will be seen, is written with great candor as well as ability, and to the discriminating reader needs no encomium. He was living in Montreal in 1809, as appears from the date of his preface to his Travels, which he published in New York that year, with a dedication to Sir Joseph Banks. Ed. When I reached Michilimackinac I found several other traders, who had arrived before me, from different parts of the country, and who, in general, declared the dispositions of the Indians to be hostile to the English, and even apprehended some attack. M. Laurent Ducharme distinctly informed Major Etherington that a plan was absolutely conceived for destroying him, his garrison and all the English in the upper country; but the commandant believing this and other reports to be...

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Slave Narrative of Phoebe Banks

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Person Interviewed: Phoebe Banks Location: Muskogee, Oklahoma Date of Birth: October 17, 1860 Age: 78 In 1860, there was a little Creek Indian town of Sodom on the north bank of the Arkansas River, in a section the Indians called Chocka Bottoms, where Hose Perryman had a big farm or ranch for a long time before the Civil War. That same year, on October 17, I was born on the Perryman place, which was northwest of where I lived now in Muskogee; only in them days Fort Gibson and Okmulgee was the biggest towns around and Muskogee hadn’t shaped up yet. My mother belonged to Mose Perryman when I was born: he was one of the best known Creeks in the whole nation, and one of his younger brothers, Legus Perryman, was made the big chief of the Creeks (1887) a long time after the slaves was freed. Mother’s name was Eldee; my father’s name was William McIntosh, because he belonged to a Creek Indian family by that name. Everybody say the McIntoshes was leaders in the Creek doings away back there in Alabama long before they come out here. With me, there was twelve children in our family; Daniel, Stroy, Scott, Segal, Neil, Joe, Phillip, Mollie, Harriett, Sally and Queenie. The Perryman slave cabins was...

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Biographical Sketch of William Banks

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now William Banks was born in the part of Marlboro now Roxbury, May 13, 1802, and came to Gilsum in 1820. He is a shoemaker by trade. He has served the town as selectman and lives with his son, Elmer D., on road 2. The latter is at present one of the selectmen of the...

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Biographical Sketch of John Banks

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Banks, progenitor of the Banks family in Alstead, was in the employ of Nathaniel S. Prentiss, and came with him from Grafton, Mass., in 1774 he married Susan Prentiss and reared a large family of children, one of whom was the father of Gen. N. P. Banks, of Waltham, Mass. Two sons of John,-Andrew and Jabez M., spent their lives in Alstead. Andrew married Fannie Livermore, resided on a farm on road 36, reared eight children, and died in 1876, aged 83 years. His son Gardner G. has been engaged in the manufacture of lumber at the outlet of Warren pond over thirty years. He married Ella, daughter of Jonas S. Partridge, and has no...

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Slave Narrative of Mose Banks

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Interviewer: Pernella M. Anderson Person Interviewed: Mose Banks Location: Douglas Addition, El Dorado, Arkansas Age: 69 “My name is Mose Banks and I am sixty-nine years old. I was born in 1869. I was born four years after freedom but still I was a slave in a way. My papa stayed with his old miss and master after freedom until he died and he just died in 1918, so we all stayed with him too. I had one of the best easiest times in my life. My master was name Bob Stevenson and he was a jewel. Never meaned us, never dogged, never hit one of us in his life. He bought us just like he bought my papa. He never made any of the girls work in the field. He said the work was too hard. He always said splitting rails, bushing, plowing and work like that was for men. That work makes no count women. “The girls swept yards, cleaned the house, nursed, and washed and ironed, combed old miss’ and the children’s hair and cut their finger and toe nails and mended the clothes. The womens’ job was to cook, attend to the cows, knit all the socks for the men and boys, spin thread, card bats, weave cloth, quilt, sew, scrub and...

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Biography of George L. Banks

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now George L. Banks. A sterling pioneer and citizen who is now living virtually retired in the City of Independence, Mr. Banks is specially entitled to recognition in this history. He was one of the early settlers of Montgomery County and has contributed his full quota to its civic and industrial development and progress, and he was long one of the prominent and influential exponents of agricultural industry in this section of the state. High honors also are his for the valiant service which he gave as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war. Mr. Banks was born in Lake County, Indiana, October 13, 1839. His father, Orin Banks, was born in the State of New York, in 1800, and was there reared to manhood, his marriage having been solemnized in Schoharie County, that state. His entire active career was one of close association with the basic industry of agriculture and he was one of the pioncer farmers of LaPorte County, Indiana, where he established his home in 1845. In about 1850 he removed to Lake County, Indiana, where he died in 1856. He was a supporter of the democratic party until the organization of the republican party, when he transferred his allegiance to the latter. He was influential in community affairs and was called...

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Biographical Sketch of Banks, W. E.

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Banks, W. E. dealer in a general line of drugs, medicines, books, stationery and druggists’ sundries. He opened the business in 1877, and carries a stock of $5,000. He first came to Russell in 1877, and opened the above business. Born in Putnam County, Ind., in 1855, Parents moved to Appanoose County, Iowa, in 1864. He began business in life as clerk in a drug store in 1874. Lived in Iowa until he came to Kansas. Married in 1878, to Miss Emma Crist, of Indiana. They have two sons – Emmett E. and Eugene O. He is the present Mayor of Russell, and a member of Russell Lodge, No. 119, I. O. O. F.; member of the City Council in...

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