Surname: Ballard

Descendants of Charles Little Hauthaway of North Bridgewater MA

For nearly a century there have lived in North Bridgewater and Brockton representatives of an earlier family of the name in and about Boston. Reference is made to some of the descendants of Charles Little Hauthaway, who, coming from Roxbury in youth, in 1828, cast his lot with the people of North Bridgewater, where have figured most successfully three generations of the family. From members of this family it seems that the English spelling of the name is Haughtweight or Hautweight, which may be the same as the old County Suffolk English spelling Hautwat, a name still extant there. The records of a century and more ago in Boston reveal the spelling Hauthwait, one Francis Hauthwait being the owner and occupier of a dwelling “North on West street; east by John Ballard; West by Frothingham.”

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Allen Genealogy of New Bedford Massachusetts

The Allen family of New Bedford Massachusetts is descended from George Allen who’s children and descendants would eventually settle in Old Dartmouth and New Bedford Massachusetts. This is an extensive genealogy of five sons of the fourteen children of James Allen and Sarah Howland of New Bedford MA, including the ancestry of James Allen back to George Allen.

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Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

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Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

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Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that...

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Genealogy of Garriot K. Broyles

Broyles, Bruhls, Broils,Broiles originated from northwestern Germany. There are two towns one of which is Bruhl along the west side of the Rhine River. The largest community has an 18th century castle called Augustburg. The archbishop of Cologne had created the town in 1285. The family Brohl had lived in the area as early as the 14th century as in 1332 one Brohl had received a coat of arms. Some of the Broyles family came to America in 1717 to Culpepper, Virginia. The first was John Broyles who had several sons who were the ancestors for many of the Broyles today. The Broyles story here begins with the first one who came to Shelby County, Illinois. There has been much difficulty trying to pinpoint the ancestry of Garriot K. Broyles’ parents. His ancestry will be printed in a later volume. Garriot K. Broyles was born circa 1810 in Madison Coop Virginia. He had one known brother Ephraim and one sister Martha. In later years Garriot stated on his second marriage application that he was the son of Moses and Susannah Broyles, Garriot married Eunice V. Wayman on 22 December 1831 in Madison Co., Virginia. Eunice was the probable daughter of John Henry and Margaret Frances Wayman. Apparently the Broyles family lived near Harrisonburg, Virginia since one of their sons was born there. Sometime in 1858 the family moved to...

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1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and Richardson, No. Bridgewater Ballard S. D., Plymouth Dodge J. E., Plymouth Painters Carriage  Peirce Wm. M., Abington Ford B. F. East Abington Bates Asa, South Abington Hersey David A. Hingham Sprague Joseph T., Hingham Eldridge David, Kingston Boomer B. L., Middleboro Southworth Rodney E., Middleboro Sparrow J. G., North Bridge water Jones John B., North Bridge water Sargent Samuel, Bridge water Thomas William E., Bridge water Jones Charles L., Plymouth Young Charles, Scituate Young Edw., Scituate Painters (House and Sign) Davis W. H.. Abington French Joseph, Abington Ford B. F., East Abington Gilson L. C., East Abington Lawrence Thomas R., East Abington Lincoln S. B., North Abington Harding J. S., South Abington Beed Philip, South Abington Alden James S., Bridgewater Braman H. F. & J. G., Bridgewater Chandler Alden, Duxbury Hathaway Joshua W., Duxbury Sampson Alfred, Duxbury Grow & Wentworth, East Bridgewater Bonney E. P., Halifax Cook John, Halifax Bailey Melzer, Hanover Bryant Snow, Hanover Corbin Frank, Hanover Eells John P., Hanover Sturtevant George, Hanover Roberts John C., Hanson Cobb David, Hingham Cross and...

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Treaty of August 24, 1835

Treaty with the Comanche and Witchetaw Indians and their associated Bands. For the purpose of establishing and perpetuating peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Comanche and Witchetaw nations, and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and between these nations or tribes, and the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, the President of the United States has, to accomplish this desirable object, and to aid therein, appointed Governor M. Stokes, M. Arbuckle Brigdi.-Genl. United States army, and F. W. Armstrong, Actg. Supdt. Western Territory, commissioners on the part of the United States; and the said Governor M. Stokes and M. Arbuckle, Brigdi. Genl. United States army, with the chiefs and representatives of the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca, and Quapaw nations or tribes of Indians, have met the chiefs, warriors, and representatives of the tribes first above named at Camp Holmes, on the eastern border of the Grand Prairie, near the Canadian river, in the Muscogee nation, and after full deliberation, the said nations or tribes have agreed with the United States, and with one another upon the following articles: Article 1. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the Comanche and Witchetaw nations and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and...

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Biographical Sketch of David E. Ballard

A native of Franklin County, Vermont, David E. Ballard is a leading citizen and a prosperous farmer of Washington, and looks back with still keen interest to the days of nearly sixty years ago, when he assisted in the civil organization of his county and his state. He was born March 20, 1837, of English and Revolutionary ancestors. When he was a boy his father, Appleton Ballard, moved to Morrow County, Ohio, not to cultivate the land, but to provide his family with a home while he fared forth on the high seas of the East. While thus engaged, he was murdered and robbed in the harbor of Halifax, after he had disposed of his cargo. In May, 1857, when he had but just entered his twenty-first year, David E. Ballard located in Brown County, Kansas, and in the following year moved to Washington County, which was then on the point of organization. In fact, he assisted in that work, and was the first county clerk. In 1859 he was elected to the House of Representatives of the first State Legislature (1861), and in the senatorial election was an active partisan of James H. Lane. He joined the ranks of the Second Kansas Infantry in November, 1861, and in the following year was made first lientenant, being mustered out of the service, in February, 1865. He was in the...

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Biographical Sketch of W. H. Ballard

(See Grant, Ghigua, and Ward)-William, son of Archibald and Annie (Fields) Ballard, was born May 29, 1852. Married December 26, 1871 Charlotte Mayes and they were the parents of: Janana, Anna, Ruth May, Ethel Savilla and Zoe Wyly Ballard. This family furnished the largest number of graduates from the Seminaries, they being as follows: Janana in 1896, Anna in 1897, Lucinda in 1899, Sarah Eleanor in 1902, William Houston in 1904 and Ruth May in 1906. Miss Janana is and has been a teacher in the Northeastern State Normal since its inception. Anna married Crawford Conner. Lucinda married William Lee Harlan. Sarah Eleanor married Roy Woods. Ruth May married Frank Fleming. Ethel Savilla married Robert Hall. Zoe Wyly married Harold Bunch. William Houston, born May 29, 1884, married Anna Buchanan, born December 25, 1839. They were the parents of Tesquantnee Swimmer Ballard, born February 14, 1906. Mrs. Anna Ballard is now deceased. William Houston Ballard was elected District Clerk of Delaware County in 1910 and 1912. He is at present Deputy Clerk of Muskogee...

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Biography of Ernest L. Ballard

The clerk of the district court and ex-ofificio auditor and recorder of Owyhee County, Idaho, residing in Silver City, is a native of the state of Virginia, his birth having occurred in Lynchburg on the 1st of February 1862. His ancestors, leaving their home in England, crossed the briny deep to the New World and became residents of Pennsylvania at the time William Penn founded the colony. They participated in the events which go to make up the early history of the Keystone state, and representatives of the name also fought for America in the war of 1812. Removing from Pennsylvania to Virginia, the family became identified with the interests of the south. Henry Clay Ballard, the father of our subject, was born, reared and educated in the Old Dominion and became a railroad contractor. He married Miss Sally Pollard, and during the civil war he served as a captain in General Munford’s cavalry in the Confederate army. He continued to reside in Virginia until 1880, when he removed to Colorado. He is now engaged in railroad contracting in British Columbia, and has reached the age of fifty-seven years. For many years he has been a member of the Masonic fraternity and in his life exemplifies the beneficent teachings of that order. His wife died in 1880, in her fortieth year, leaving the husband and two children to mourn...

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Biographical Sketch of Volney B. Ballard

Volney B. Ballard has been a leading factor in business affairs at Attica since 1910, is proprietor of the only drug store of the town, and is also the leading banker. Mr. Ballard was born at Huntsville in Reno County, Kansas, August 22, 1883. His ancestors settled in New York from England in Colonial times, and some of them fought as soldiers in the Revolutionary war. His father is Volney B. Ballard, Sr., a resident of Attica. He was born in Jefferson County, New York, in 1844, grew up and married there and learned the blacksmith’s trade in early life. When no more than a boy in years he entered a New York regiment of infantry and was fighting the battles of the Union throughout the South for a period of three years. In 1881 he brought his family to Huntsville, Kansas, buying a farm, but since 1890 had lived retired. His home was at Nickerson until 1915, when he moved to Attica. He is a republican in politics. Volney B. Ballard, Sr., married Cora A. Hill, who was born in Jefferson County, New York, in 1857 and is still living. They have three children: May, unmarried and teaching school at Dragoon, Arizons: Volney B.; and Herbert C., a merchant at Cochize, Arizona. Mr. Ballard spent his early youth on a farm in Reno County, attended rural schools there,...

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