Surname: Baker

Biography of Henry C. Baker

A most efficient and trustworthy officer is Henry C. Baker, chief of police of Racine, who was called to his present position in 1907. He was born in Madison, Wisconsin, February 7, 1865, a son of Henry and Christina (Meyer) Baker, both of whom were natives of Germany. In the year 1847 they left the fatherland and came to the United States, establishing their home upon a farm near Madison, Wisconsin, where Mr. Baker carried on general agricultural pursuits until after the outbreak of the Civil war, when he put aside the work of the fields and other business and personal considerations to join the army as a member of the Seventeenth Wisconsin Infantry, with which he served for three years in defense of the Union cause. Both he and his wife have now passed away. Henry C. Baker obtained a public school education and afterward learned the printer’s trade, working in the office of the Madison Democrat and of the State Journal at Madison. In May, 1897, he was made chief of police in the capital city. in which position he continued until January, 1907, when he was appointed deputy United States marshal. He served in that office for six months and then resigned to come to Racine as chief of police at the request of the police commission and of the mayor. A. J. Horlick. During his...

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Biography of John R. Baker

John R. Baker, who is successfully engaged in general farming in Yorkville Township, was born in Mount Pleasant Township, Racine County, on the 20th of April, 1847. His parents, Abraham and Elizabeth (Rowe) Baker, were born in Cornwall, England, the former in 1817 and the latter in 1816. Their marriage occurred in their native land but not long after that event they came to the United States and located in Mount Pleasant Township. The father purchased eighty acres of land, which he lost, however, on account of an imperfect deed, and subsequently he bought an eighty acre tract and a forty acre tract in the same Township. He had followed agricultural pursuits in England and his previous experience was of great value to him in developing and operating his farm in this County. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and in politics was a democrat. His death occurred in Franksville in 1894. He had survived his wife since 1866. Previous to her marriage she served as lady’s maid, receiving excellent wages for that work. They were the parents of four children, of whom only John R., survives. The last named is indebted to the public schools for his education and to his father for his training in farm work. In 1873 he removed to his present place, which comprises one hundred and twenty acres of good...

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Biography of Adam J. Baker, M.P.P.

Adam J. Baker, who is serving his second term in the Ontario parliament for the riding of Russell, is of Holland descent, grandson of William Baker, a United Empire Loyalist, and son of William Baker, junior, formerly a merchant at Osnabruck, county of Stormont, where our subject was born September 22, 1821. His mother was Ann Eve Waldorff. He received such a preliminary education as the country schools furnished fifty years ago, adding to it by his own exertions, after going into business. When ten years old he lost his father; his older brother, John W. Baker, continued the mercantile business, and Adam became a clerk for him. In 1843, he commenced business for himself in the village of Metcalfe, township of Osgoode, county of Russell, and traded there for thirty years, being engaged also, much of the time, in the manufacture of lumber and pearl ash, making 200 or 300 barrels of the latter a year, and being eminently successful in most of his ventures. Mr. Baker retired from the mercantile and manufacturing business four or five years ago, but for twenty years has been engaged in farming, and continues that occupation. Mr. Baker has always been a hard working, painstaking man, and a prudent manager, and his industry has been liberally rewarded. He has held a great variety of officeswas postmaster of Metcalfe twenty years; has been...

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Biographical Sketch of Godfrey P. Baker

Godfrey Phipps Baker, postmaster of Ottawa, descended from the Bakers of Sissinghurst, Cranbrooke, England, and is the second son of George William Baker, by Ann, the eldest daughter of John Cole, once Mayor of Norwich. Was born at Shooter’s Hill, Woolwich, England, in August 1822. His father was a captain in the Royal Artillery, and having sold his commission, came in 1832 to Upper Canada, settling at Bytown, then a village in its infancy, and very unpromising at that. Two years later, Captain Baker was appointed post master, to fill a vacancy caused by the demise of Matthew Connell; and for some years the elder brother of our subject, Hugh Cossart Baker, had charge of the office, the present postmaster rendering such assistance as he could, being a lad just entering upon his teens. Forty and fifty years ago, the present county of Carleton was in the Dalhousie Distrct, and in 1842 Mr. Baker, though being then under age, was chosen district clerk, a position which he faithfully filled for four years, and at the same time that of slide master of the old Buchanan slide, which eventually passed into the hands of the Bank of Upper Canada. In 1846, his brother removed to Toronto, and our subject took full charge of the Bytown post office; and in 1857, on the resignation of his father, the son became his...

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Biography of Alfred E. Baker

Alfred E. Baker, president and treasurer of the P. C. Murphy Trunk Company (established 1860, incorporated 1893), was born at Jefferson City, Missouri, December 10, 1865, a son of Dr. John and Amelia (Steels) Baker of Rugby, England. After attending public and private schools he started his career in the business world in the office of the LaGrange Iron Company of Stewart county, Tennessee, where his brother, Thomas C. Baker, was manager and E. C. Sterling, of St. Louis, president. The holdings of the company comprised forty thousand acres of ore and timber land, and was one of the large charcoal, pig-iron producing companies of this country at that time. There he continued until 1888 and in the latter year came to St. Louis to take a position in the office of the Hydraulic Press Brick Company, E. C. Sterling being also president of the latter company. About this time the mining fever was at its height, and he became connected with the Granite Mountain Mining Company of Granite, Montana, a well known mining company with general offices in St. Louis, L. M. Rumsey of St. Louis being president of the company. Mr. Baker resided at Granite, Montana, until 1893, when the mines were closed indefinitely, due to the low price of silver. During the same period he was associated with the L. J. Baker Company, which conducted a...

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Biographical Sketch of J. M. Baker

J. M. Baker, a well-known farmer of the Fourteenth District, was born March 31, 1830, in White County, Tenn. His parents were William H. and Lucinda (Erwin) Baker. The father was born about 1800 in Virginia, of English descent, a son of James and Mary (Holmes) Baker. The father was a brave soldier in the war of 1812. He died at Norfolk. His widow immigrated to Tennessee with her children, five daughters and one son. They located in White County, where she died in 1856. William H. died November 14, 1872. His wife was of Irish origin, a daughter of William and Jane (Dildine) Erwin. His Maternal grandfather held a prominent position in the Revolutionary war. The subject of this sketch was raised on a farm, and educated at the Union Institute, Dekalb County, in which county he engaged in farming when about twenty-three years of age. Shortly afterward he moved to White County, where, about 1870, he was elected magistrate, and served two terms. In 1883 he returned to Dekalb County, and in 1885 was elected magistrate. He was married, in March 1854, to Barbary, daughter of William and Zelpha Robinson. This Union resulted in the birth of Mary Viola (the widow of S. Simrell), Elizabeth C., William R., Susan M. (the wife of M. Davis), James M., Sarah Lena, Emma Florence, Barbary L. and Charles R. Mr....

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Biographical Sketch of Frank Baker

This native young Oregonian has demonstrated what pluck and perseverance can do when manipulated with wise management in the things of the financial world, as conditions obtained in this country, having made a brilliant success, as will be noted from the following. Mr. Baker was born in Lane county, Oregon, on June 20, 1870, being the son of George and Mary (Watson) Baker. His mother died in that county and the father with his children removed to Washington county in 1874. In the fall of 1878 he came with his family to Harney valley, settling where the town of Burns is now located. The children were three boys and two girls. The father went to freighting and soon died, thus leaving the little group orphans in a frontier region. Our subject had but little opportunity to gain an education from schools, but made the best of what he did have and also by careful and diligent research qualified himself for the battle of life. He soon went to riding the range for wages and continued diligently at this occupation until 1894, when he started in for himself, handling livestock. He gained steadily and in 1898 he purchased his present place of one hundred and sixty acres three miles northeast from Burns, which is a well improved ranch, producing abundant crops of hay for his stock, which consists mostly of...

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Biographical Sketch of A.T. Baker, M.D.

A.T. Baker, M.D., was born in Jackson County, Ia., in 1847. He began the study of medicine at an early age, graduated from the Iowa State University in the class of ’76. The same year he located at Webster City, where he soon built up a large and lucrative practice. He moved to Ida Grove in 1879, and is ne of the leading physicians of the...

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Biographical Sketch of David Baker

David Baker, son of Thomas, was born in Keene in 1796, married Amanda H. Ellis, and reared a family of eight children. He located upon a farm on road 3, and lived there until his death, in 1868. His widow still resides on the...

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Biographical Sketch of Barzaliel Baker

Barzaliel Baker came to Marlboro from Westminster, Mass., about 1800. He was a farmer and settled upon the farm now occupied by Howard Clark, where he died, at the age of eighty-two. His son Asa was born in Marlboro, where lived until 1833, when he moved, to Jaffrey, where he remained until his death, in October, 1869, at the age of sixty-six years. Edwin C., a native of Jaffrey, came to this town in...

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Slave Narrative of Georgia Baker

Interviewer: Mrs. Sadie Hornsby Person Interviewed: Georgia Baker Location: Athens, Georgia Georgia’s address proved to be the home of her daughter, Ida Baker. The clean-swept walks of the small yard were brightened by borders of gay colored zinnias and marigolds in front of the drab looking two-story, frame house. “Come in,” answered Ida, in response to a knock at the front door. “Yessum, Mammy’s here. Go right in dat dere room and you’ll find her.” Standing by the fireplace of the next room was a thin, very black woman engaged in lighting her pipe. A green checked gingham apron partially covered her faded blue frock over which she wore a black shirtwaist fastened together with “safety first” pins. A white cloth, tied turban fashion about her head, and gray cotton hose worn with black and white slippers that were run down at the heels, completed her costume. “Good mornin’. Yessum, dis here’s Georgia,” was her greeting. “Let’s go in dar whar Ida is so us can set down. I don’t know what you come for, but I guess I’ll soon find out.” Georgia was eager to talk but her articulation had been impaired by a paralytic stroke and at times it was difficult to understand her jumble of words. After observance of the amenities; comments on the weather, health and such subjects, she began: “Whar was I born? Why...

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Biography of F. S. Baker

F. S. BAKER. This gentleman has been one of the wide-awake and enterprising citizens of Harrison, Arkansas, since 1873, but first saw the light of day in Smith County, Virginia, May 22, 1842, a son of Andrew and Mary (Hash) Baker, who were also Virginians. They came with their family to Fulton County, Arkansas, and there the father was successfully engaged in farming and merchandising up to the breaking out of the great Civil War, and they then moved to Jasper, Newton County. In 1862 the father enlisted as a lieutenant in the Confederate service, with which he served until the war closed, being a member of Company of the Fourteenth Arkansas Volunteers. He was in the battles of Pea Ridge, Port Hudson and others, but after the close of the war Mr. Baker returned to his native county of Grayson, Virginia, where he made his home for a number of years. He then returned to Arkansas, thence to Oregon, thence back to Arkansas, and is now living retired from the active duties of life in Harrison, being in the seventy-eighth year of his age. His wife has reached the seventy-sixth milestone of her life. They reared a family of six children: F. S.; Elizabeth, wife of E. Pugh, of Boone County; Levi, who is a miller at Bellefonte; Eli makes his home in the Indian Territory; Ietitia is...

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Slave Narrative of James Baker

Interviewer: Mary D. Hudgins Person Interviewed: James Baker Location: With daughter who own home at 941 Wade St., Hot Springs, Arkansas Age: 81 The outskirts of eastern Hot Springs resemble a vast checkerboard—patterned in Black and White. Within two blocks of a house made of log-faced siding—painted a spotless white and provided with blue shutters will be a shack which appears to have been made from the discard of a dozen generations of houses. Some of the yards are thick with rusting cans, old tires and miscelaneous rubbish. Some of them are so gutted by gully wash that any attempt at beautification would be worse than useless. Some are swept—farm fashion—free from surface dust and twigs. Some attempt—others achieve grass and flowers. Vegetable gardens are far less frequent then they should be, considering space left bare. The interviewer frankly lost her way several times. One improper direction took her fully half a mile beyond her destination. From a hilltop she could look down on less elevated hills and into narrow valleys. The impression was that of a cheaply painted back-drop designed for a “stock” presentation of “Mrs. Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch.” Moving along streets, alleys and paths backward “toward town” the interviewer reached another hill. Almost a quarter of a mile away she spied an old colored man sunning himself on the front porch of a well kept...

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Biography of William A. Baker

The commercial interests of Moscow are well represented by William Alexander Baker, a leading and enterprising merchant, whose well directed efforts, sound judgment and reliable dealing are bringing to him a creditable and satisfactory success. For twelve years he has carried on operations in Moscow, where he deals in both new and second-hand goods. He is a native of Virginia, born in Augusta County, July 13, 1855, of Scotch-Irish descent. His grandfather, Guinn Baker, was the founder of the family in the Old Dominion, and was an industrious and respected farmer and a valued member of the Methodist church. He devoted his entire life to agricultural pursuits in Virginia, and died at the age of eighty-two years. His son, Frank Baker, father of our subject, was born in Pennsylvania and married Miss Martha Guinn, a native of Virginia. They removed to Tippecanoe County, Indiana, and he began farming on a tract of land of forty acres, but as time passed he extended the boundaries of his place until it comprised one hundred and forty acres. His wife died in her forty-second year, but he lived to be seventy-one years of age. Both enjoyed the high regard of their fellow men, and their lives were well spent. They had a family of three daughters and two sons, of whom four are living. William A. Baker, their eldest child, spent his...

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