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Surname: Bailey

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to...

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An Historical Sketch of the Seneca County Medical Society

At the anniversary meeting of the Seneca County Medical Society held at Waterloo, July 23, 1885, a resolution was introduced by Dr. S. R. Welles, and adopted by the Society, that a committee be appointed which should prepare biographical sketches of members of the Society from its earliest history to the present time. As a result, this manuscript was published which includes 75 biographies of the early pioneers of the Seneca County Medical Society.

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Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you...

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A Brief History of Norwich University

In 1835, the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy became “Norwich University,” by virtue of an act of incorporation granted by the legislature of Vermont the previous year. Captain Alden Partridge remained at the head of the institution until 1843, and soon after sold the buildings and grounds to the Trustees of the University. There was one feature in the scheme of education established at Norwich University which honorably distinguished it from nearly all other similar institutions of its time in New England. From the first it was wholly free from sectarian influence. This principle was prominently set forth...

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Norwich Plain Meeting House

The present meeting house at Norwich Plain 1The writer is informed that the architect of the building was Ammi B. Young, who planned the additions to the White House at Washington, D. C. was built in 1817, and dedicated November 20th of the same year. On the following day, Reverend R. W. Bailey was ordained pastor and continued as such till November, 1823, when he was dismissed. The ordination sermon was preached by Nathan Perkins, Jr., A. M., pastor of the Second Church in Amherst, Mass., from Isaiah LXII, 6-7. — “I have set watchmen upon thy walls, Jerusalem, which shall never hold their peace day nor night; ye that make mention of the Lord, keep not silence, and give him no rest till he establish, and till he make Jerusalem a praise in the earth.” Mr. Bailey was afterwards settled in Pittsfield, Mass., and later became president of Austin College, Texas. The church, which consisted at its organization of only eleven members, was quite small at the outset, increased during the ministry of Mr. Bailey to an aggregate of forty-seven members. After the dismissal of Mr. Bailey, the pulpit was supplied by Reverends James W. Woodward and J. R. Wheelock, and by Reverend Doctor Roswell Shurtleff till December, 1831, when Reverend Thomas Hall was installed pastor and continued with the church about three years. Under the ministry of...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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List of the Drummond Island Voyageurs

In 1828 the transfer of the British garrison from Drummond Island to Penetanguishene commenced. A list of voyageurs who resided on Drummond Island at the time of the transfer. In many cases a brief biographical sketch is contained which may provide clues to their ethnicity, family relationships, and the location where they or their ancestors settled.

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Biography of Charles A. Bailey

Charles A. Bailey, an able business man of Merrimack County, New Hampshire, and an esteemed resident of Hookset, was born in Pembroke, November 11, 1847, son of Charles and Sarah A. (Edmunds) Bailey. His paternal grandfather, Josiah Bailey, was born in Chester, Rockingham County, this State, on February 11, 1766. When a young man he removed with his family to Pembroke, Merrimack County, and was there engaged as a miller until his death, February 19, 1854. His wife, whose maiden name was Ruth Frost, was born March 8, 1769, in Tewksbury, Mass., and died in Pembroke, N.H., November 28, 1835. They were married November 15, 1792, and were the parents of ten children. Charles, the youngest child, was born in Dunbarton, N.H., September 28, 1810, and when but four years of age accompanied his parents to Pembroke, where he grew to manhood and was educated. He followed farming in connection with brickmaking for many years, coming from Pembroke to Hookset in 1852. Here he purchased the estate now owned and occupied by his widow, and was engaged in his two occupations until his death, June 2, 1896, being a most successful business man. He was highly esteemed wherever known for his uprightness of character. Politically, Pembroke served as Selectman two terms. Both he and his good wife early united with the Methodist Church of Suncook. On April 1, 1841,...

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1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and Richardson, No. Bridgewater Ballard S. D., Plymouth Dodge J. E., Plymouth Painters Carriage  Peirce Wm. M., Abington Ford B. F. East Abington Bates Asa, South Abington Hersey David A. Hingham Sprague Joseph T., Hingham Eldridge David, Kingston Boomer B. L., Middleboro Southworth Rodney E., Middleboro Sparrow J. G., North Bridge water Jones John B., North Bridge water Sargent Samuel, Bridge water Thomas William E., Bridge water Jones Charles L., Plymouth Young Charles, Scituate Young Edw., Scituate Painters (House and Sign) Davis W. H.. Abington French Joseph, Abington Ford B. F., East Abington Gilson L. C., East Abington Lawrence Thomas R., East Abington Lincoln S. B., North Abington Harding J. S., South Abington Beed Philip, South Abington Alden James S., Bridgewater Braman H. F. & J. G., Bridgewater Chandler Alden, Duxbury Hathaway Joshua W., Duxbury Sampson Alfred, Duxbury Grow & Wentworth, East Bridgewater Bonney E. P., Halifax Cook John, Halifax Bailey Melzer, Hanover Bryant Snow, Hanover Corbin Frank, Hanover Eells John P., Hanover Sturtevant George, Hanover Roberts John C., Hanson Cobb David, Hingham Cross and...

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Biographical Sketch of Lawrence D. Bailey, Judge

Judge Lawrence D. Bailey, long a resident of Emporia and the pioneer lawyer of Southwestern Kansas, also accomplished much in forwarding the agricultural interests of the state. He was a New Hampshire man, born at Sutton, Merrimack County, August 26, 1819. He was of an old Euglish manufacturing family, and his American ancestors are said to have built the first woolen factory in America at what is now Georgetown, Massachusetts. The judge was educated in Pennsylvania, read law and was admitted to the bar in July, 1846, and after practicing three years in New Hampshire started for California, by way of Cape Horn. After spending four years on the coast, engaged in lumbering, gold digging, practicing law and editorial work, he returned to New Hampshire in the fall of 1853. He then practiced law in his native state until he started for Kansas in the spring of 1857. On the second of April, of that year, Judge Bailey settled on a claim near Clinton, Douglas County, but in the following September opened a law office at Emporia. In 1858 he was elected to the Territorial Legislature; in the following year became associate justice of the Supreme Court of Kansas, under the Wyandotte constitution, and in 1862 was re-elected for six years, under statehood. In 1863 he assisted in organizing the State Board of Agriculture, serving as its president for...

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Slave Narrative of Prince Smith

Interviewer: Augusta Ladson Person Interviewed: Prince Smith Location: Wadmalaw, South Carolina Experiences Of An Ex-Slave On Wardmalaw Island Massa Wus Kind to Slaves Prince Smith, a man who is said to be over a hundred years of age, has lived on Wardmalaw Island practically all of his life. His experiences during slavery are very interesting and true to life. An interview with him revealed the following: “I was bo’n an’ raise’ on dis island and was only frum here when de Civil War had begun. W’en Fort Sumter wus fired on mossa carried seventy of us to Greenville, South Ca’lina on account of its montanous sections, which was believed would have prevented the Yankees invasion in regard to their hide-out.” We stayed een Greenville nearly four years. Durin’ dat time mossa planted his fa’m an’ we wurk as if we wus right here. “The Yankees had gunboats,” he continued, “but dey didn’ help dem atoll fur dey couldn’ make any a’tack dat dis place is so unsuited fur water battles. But forest’ battles wus fight on Beaufort Island and Port Royale. We een Greenville didn’ know enyt’ing ’bout whut wus goin’ on except what wus brought to us collud people by dose who wus sent to da town. Mossa didn’ tell us eny ting. Fur almos’ four ‘ears we stayed een Greenville w’en suddenly one Chuesday mornin’ bright an’...

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Biography of Fred Warren Bailey, M. D.

Dr. Fred Warren Bailey, a St. Louis surgeon, was born in Minier, Tazewell county, Illinois, September 30, 1876. His father was Dr. G. O. Bailey, also a native of that state and of Scotch descent, their family having been founded in America in early colonial days. The family was represented in the Revolutionary war and has sent its representatives to each of the succeeding wars of the country, including the Indian war. Dr. G. O. Bailey was a graduate of McKendree College at Lebanon, Illinois, where he won his Bachelor of Science degree and later he pursued a course of study in Rush Medical College of Chicago, which in 1865 conferred upon him the M. D. degree. He then continued to devote his attention to his profession until his death, which occurred in Los Angeles, California, in 1916, when he was seventy three years of age. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Helen Gertrude Arnold, was a native of New York and belonged to one of the old families of that state of Scotch and English descent. She can trace her ancestry directly back to Oliver Cromwell and also to Sir Walter Scott. She is now a resident of Los Angeles, California. Dr. Fred Warren Bailey was the fifth child in a family of four sons and five daughters. He obtained a public school education in Tazewell...

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Biography of Jasper N. Bailey

Jasper N. Bailey was born in Carter county, Kentucky, June 8, 1838; a son of Jesse and Margaret Bailey, nee Webb. His father, by profession, was a teacher, and died in the year 1848; and his mother died December 16, 1876. When he was two years of age his parents left Kentucky and came to Lawrence county, Ohio. After being there six years they came to Daviess county, Missouri. When about seventeen years of age he left home to see the world for him-self and went to New Mexico and remained one year, then returned to Missouri and remained till 1857 when he took his mother to California. They started to drive through with ox-teams, but after getting into Kansas his mother was taken sick and the trip abandoned. He next staked a claim in Brown county, Kansas, and remained two years, then, 1859, spent one year in Colorado, after which he returned to Missouri, and October 10, 1863, enlisted as a member of Company G, First Missouri State Cavalry Militia and served till the close of the war. On February 12th, 1863, he was married to Miss Martha Miller, a native of Breckinridge county, Kentucky, and born July 3, 1847. Her parents, Michael and Martha Miller came to Missouri and located in DeKalb county; her father died in 1869, and her mother in 1879. They have had seven...

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Biography of Luther Chapin Bailey

During his residence at Topeka since 1889 Mr. Bailey had developed a large insurance business, had been a citizen in whom public spirit is one of the most important qualities, and to his many personal friends is known as a man of charming sociability and of exceptional interest. He was born near Waynetown, Indiana, September 23, 1866, a son of Horatio Jackson Bailey and Leah Jane (Gartrell) Bailey, his wife. His great-grandfather, George Bailey, was a Scotchman, and married a Scotch woman from North Ireland. He migrated to the State of Delaware and settled on Chesapeake Bay, and here at this home the grandfather, Horatio Bailey, was born. This Horatio Bailey was a soldier in the War of 1812, and married Sarah Ann Hearst. The Hearst family was a numerous one, living on Chesapeake Bay, in the State of Delaware. Many of them followed the sea, and George Hearst, the great-grandfather, was privateersman in the war of the Revolution, and earned distinction for valorous service. Horatio Jackson Bailey, father of the Topeka citizen, was a minister, having removed to Indiana from Ohio. His wife, Leah Jane Gartrell, was descended from a French Huguenot family that long lived in Virginia. The Gartrells were among the first families of Virginia, were planters on a large scale and before the war owned many slaves. The Gartrells came into Virginia from the southern...

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