Surname: Babcock

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In...

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Douglas Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Abildtrup, J. C. Wf. Marie; ch.Nels, Margaret and Arnold. P. O. Audubon. R. 5. O. 90 ac., sec. 35. (11.) “Clover Leaf Farm.” Andersen, Carl Jr. Wf.Oma; ch. George. P. O. Audubon, R. 5. R. 80 ac., sec. 17. (24.) Owner, K. Larsen. Andersen, Chris. Wf. Vernal; ch. Lorene, Manuel and Ethel. P. O. Manning, R. 1. O. 118.49 ac., sec. 5. (19.) Anderson, J. A. Wf. Anna; ch.Christena, Leona, Harry and Ruby. P. O. Audubon, R. 5. O. 100...

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History of the Industries of Norwich VT

Although the products of the industries in Norwich have not been of great magnitude they have been quite varied in character. Such information in regard to these callings as we have been able to obtain we will present to our readers, though not in strict chronological order. Among the earliest establishments coming under this head was a grist mill established as early as 1770, by Hatch and Babcock on Blood Brook, on or near the site of the grist mill now operated by J. E. Willard, a short distance up the stream from where it empties into the Connecticut...

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First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied...

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The Proprietors of Norwich Vermont

The larger part of the names of the grantees of Norwich are names of Connecticut men then resident in Mansfield and neighboring towns. Captain Hezekiah Johnson, Samuel Slafter, Joseph Storrs, and William Johnson 3rd, are known to have lived in Mansfield; Amos Fellows, James West, Adoniram Grant, and Samuel Cobb were of Tolland; Ebenezar Heath, Captain Abner Barker and William Johnson of Willington, towns adjacent to Mansfield on the north. The last nine names are those of New Hampshire and Massachusetts men, several of them members of the provincial government in the former province. Major Joseph Blanchard was of Dunstable, Mass. He had executed in 1760, by direction of Governor Wentworth, the first survey of the townships lying along the river from Charlestown to Newbury. His name appears as proprietor in many town charters about this time. But few of the original grantees ever came personally to Norwich to settle. Many of them, it is probable, were people of considerable property, well advanced in life, whose years unfitted them to endure the hard-ships of pioneers in a new settlement. Such would naturally transfer their rights to their sons, or to the young and enterprising among their friends and neighbors. This is known to have been the case in several instances. But Jacob Fenton and Ebenezar Smith, both proprietors, were here in 1763. The former died on the 15th of...

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Norwich Vermont an Independent Township

In America the germ of political organization is the Township, older than the County, older than the State. In New England we find towns established as independent communities, endowed with distinctive rights and privileges, as early as the middle of the seventeenth century. It is to these town governments that we must look for the foundation of republican liberty, to the town meeting, where all citizens meet on a plane of equality to choose their local officers and manage their local affairs. Here is the firm basis upon which all free institutions can rest. Ralph Waldo Emerson once proposed that the records of a New England town should be printed and presented to the governments of Europe, to the English nation as a thank-offering and as a certificate of the progress of the Saxon race; to the continental nations as a lesson of humanity and love. De Tocqueville said that the government of a New England township was the best specimen of a pure democracy that the world has ever seen. The town charters granted by New Hampshire conferred upon the inhabitants of each township, from its first organization, the right of self-government in town meeting, by the election of town officers and general ejection of town affairs. Such, also, had long been the practice in Connecticut, from whence a large proportion of all the early settlers had immigrated...

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Biographical Sketch of Gen. Carmi W. Babcock

Gen. Carmi W. Babcock, president of the first free state council of 1857-58, a leading citizen of Lawrence and a prominent contractor in the building of several noted structures of the state, was born in Franklin County, Vermont, April 21, 1830. In 1850, after teaching for a time, he moved to St. Paul, Minnesota, where he read law and was admitted to the bar. He arrived at Lawrence in September, 1854, and finding that everything was too unsettled to make the practice of the law reliable he engaged in the real estate business. In 1857 he established a bank, only to see it swept away by the panic of that year. He received his appointment as the first postmaster of Lawrence February 1, 1855, but was removed in 1857 to make way for a pro slavery man. He was also the second mayor of Lawrence; a member of the Committee on Resolutions at the convention of National Democracy, which assembled in June, 1855, and a member of the executive committee of the Free State convention held at Grasshopper Falls August 26, 1857. In 1869 he was appointed surveyor general of Kansas, holding the office for two terms, or until its discontinuance. He was one of the builders of the great bridge across the Kaw at Lawrence, completed in December, 1863, and, as a member of the firm of Bogert...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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Biography of William Stuart Babcock

Three brothers of the Babcock family came from England in colonial days-probably James, Jesse and Nathaniel-and settled in Newport, Rhode Island. Nathaniel afterward located in Stonington, Connecticut, and became the progenitor of the branch of the family represented by the subject of this biography. His descendant, Nathaniel, the grandfather of William Stuart Babcock, had two sons, Jonas and Stephen, and one daughter, Mary. Jonas served under Washington in the war of the revolution, and lost his life in the battle of White Plains in 1776. Stephen, born June 15th, 1765, was thrice married. The first wife, Mercy Hinckley, left four children-Eunice, Stephen, Samuel and Henry. Elizabeth Stuart, his second wife, left one daughter, Elizabeth. By a third union, with Mercy Davis, were born children: Charles D., Nathaniel S., Mercy A., John D., Jonas L. and William S. The youngest of this number, and the eleventh child, William Stuart, was born March 20th, 1822, in North Stonington, Connecticut. The district and select schools of the neighborhood afforded him an elementary education, after which the summers were spent in work on the farm and the winters in teaching. He had been accustomed from boyhood to labor and naturally preferred the healthful employments of a farmer to a more sedentary life. In 1865, having previously purchased a productive farm in Plainfield, he removed from Stonington to that town, where he has since...

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Lemuel Babcock

LEMUEL and LYDIA BABCOCK had the following children: 1. JONATHAN CHASE, b. Dec. 24, 1802. 2. THEODOSIA, b. Sept. 7, 1808. It appears that Lydia d. and that Lemuel m. second, Polly, and they had One son: 3. GEORGE, b. Dec. 19, 1811. Somewhat demented, yet very eccentric. Well known and remembered by many; became a pauper after the death of his parents; d. in Unity June 1,...

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