Surname: Austin

Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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The Mining Fields Of Idaho

The following excellent monograph by W. C. Austin was issued in pamphlet form early in the present year (1899) by authority of C. J. Bassett, state commissioner of immigration, labor and statistics, and as a valuable contribution to the history of the great mining industry of Idaho is held to be worthy of reproduction in this work: There is no other country on God’s green earth that has encompassed within her borders such vast and varied mineral wealth as Idaho. The position that Idaho occupies in the western mineral world is like a wagon wheel, of which Idaho is the hub, while her great mineral belts, radiating out from her mountain fastnesses, penetrating her sister states and enriching them, represent the spokes. Place yourself before a map and trace out several of these great mineral belts. Beginning in the southern part of California, the belt runs through Eldorado, Mariposa and Calaveras counties, thence to Bodie across into Nevada in a northeasterly course, giving birth to the great Comstock lode and other camps, through by Winnemucca, and in Idaho makes its grand entry at Silver City and De Lamar, in Owyhee county; thence on in through Rocky Bar and Atlanta, Custer and Bonanza; thence on to central Idaho, at Gibbonsville. Here the opposite spoke to the great mineral wheel comes in and penetrates the Rocky mountains on into Montana, where...

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The ABC Family Chronicles

A number of years ago this author was researching information for a local history book. During that time she encountered numerous names that were members of her family heritage. That heritage went back in time in that same local area over a hundred years ago. Four of her family lines which came to Shelby County, Illinois are discussed in this volume. The Stoneburner line begins with the author’s mother and she is in the eighth generation from 1752. The Spracklin line begins with the author’s grandmother (mother’s mother) and she is in the sixth generation from 1823. The Austin line begins with the author s great-grandmother (mother’s grandmother) and she is in the 8th generation from 1687. The Broyles line contains three sets of maternal grandparents three generations back. However, this work traces the ancestry forward rather than backward. It is impossible in a work of this type to include all the descendants over a span of 300 years. Documentation is included as much as possible as well as an index to make it easier for the researcher. Invariably there will be mistakes. May a relative be not too upset if a mistake is made. Stoneburner – Germany, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Illinois Spracklin – England, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois Austin – England, Maryland, Virginia, Missouri, Illinois Broyles – Germany, Virginia, Illinois John Marion, third child of Robert and Margaret, had...

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Genealogy of Willis Austin

The sixth child of Henry and Nancy Ann Austin was living in Madison County, Virginia by 1824. There he met Jane Malone and married her. Willis’ occupation to support her and the family was that of a carpenter and farmer. By 1850 the family had grown to nine members. They lived in Worf Town in 1850. They either remained in Virginia or moved to Missouri. 506 Willis Austin born circa 1796 Albemarle Co., Va. married 23 Aug 1823 Jane Malone born circa 1805 Virginia died 30 Sept. 1877 Mo. Children of Willis Austin and Jane Malone: 601 John H. Austin born circa 1824 Madison Co., Va. married Louisa Broyles born 6 Feb. 1837 Madison Co., Va. died 1862/3 Henry Co., Mo. 602 James N. Austin born circa 1827 603 Mary A. Austin born circa 1829 604 Elizabeth Austin born circa 1832 605 Catherine Austin born circa 1833 606 Nathan Franklin Austin born circa 1834’s married Sarah died 8 Nov. 18?5 Shelby Co., Ill. 607 Martha Austin born circa 1837 Sources for the Genealogy of Willis Austin: 1820 Census Albemarle Co., Va. 1850 Census Madison Co., Va. Janet Austin Curtis Records Va. Genealogist Vol. 16, 2, p. 9...

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Genealogy of John H. Austin

The first born son of Willis and Jane Austin lived for a time in Madison Co., Virginia. He worked as a wheelwright. Around 1854/55 he married Louisa J. Broyles, daughter of Garriott and Eunice Broyles. Later the Austin family moved to Missouri along with the Broyles family to Henry County, Missouri. There in 1857 John H. Austin bought one half acre for $38.00. His cabin was used for a post office until 1860. John H. Austin died 1862/3 but his widow Louisa continued the post office until 1864. After 1883-4 Louisa Austin and some of her children moved to Shelby County, Illinois. Her son Henry had already come to Shelby County and was living with John and Cordelia Broyles Harmon in 1880. Cordelia Harmon was Louisa Austin’s sister. Cordelia died sometime before Louisa came to Shelby County. Louisa Austin married her sister’s widower John Harmon in 1884. Louisa J. Broyles Austin Harmon lived until 11 June 1912. Her obituary appeared in the 20 June 1912 Shelby Democrat. Surviving were her husband John Harmon, sons: ‘William Austin of California; Belfield and Henry Austin of Shelby Co., Ill.; Thomas Austin of Missouri; daughter Ida Bowman of Lakewood, Ill. Stepchildren: Estella Duckett and M. M. Harmon of Lakewood, Ill. She was buried in Harmon Cemetery. 601 John H. Austin born circa 1824 Madison Co., Va. married circa 1854/5 Louisa J. Broyles born...

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Genealogy of Belfield Kirtley Austin

Belfield Austin, son of John H. Austin and Louisa J. Broyles, continued living in Henry County, Missouri where on 28 October 1883 he married Gertrude Wilma Rhodus. While in Missouri they had five children: two of which died by 1890 of cholera. During the summer of 1898 the family moved to Shelby County, Illinois where Henry, Belfield’s brother, was already living with his wife near Lakewood, Illinois. In November of that same year, Belfield and Gertrude had another son Herbert. Unfortunately on 29 Feb. 1899, “Mrs. Belfield Austin died at her home northeast of town (Lakewood)… and the remains were interred in the Harmon Cemetery Sunday. She leaves a husband and four children.” Belfield was left with children to care for, the youngest being a small baby. On November 6, 1899 C. A. Kellar assumed guardianship of the baby Herbert and moved to Colorado: Belfield K. Austin remained at his home near Lakewood until his death in 1943. His estate was administered by his son Gilbert. A public sale was held in May/June 1944 to sell two tracts of land and 1 tract of oil and mineral rights to satisfy the state of Illinois claims against the estate. The land was a five acre tract near Lakewood and five lots in Cowden. Belfield’s obituary read: ”Hatfield K. Austin, son of John and Louisa Austin, was born near Madison, Virginia, August...

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Biography of William W. Austin

William W. Austin, a farmer and drover of Webster, N.H., the son of Eldad and Naomi Austin, was born in Webster, then a part of Boscawen, July 1, 1829. His grandfather, Paul Austin, of Georgetown, Mass., was one of the first settlers of the town. Taking up land when the country around it was a wilderness, he cleared and brought under cultivation the large farm where the subject of this sketch now lives. He died in 1852; and his wife, Mehitable Lowell, of Georgetown, died in 1829. They had eight children-John, Sallie, Dorothy, Eldad, Eunice, Mary Ann, William, and Samuel. Eldad, the second son, and the father of Mr. William W. Austin, adopted farming as his occupation, and remained at home with his parents until his marriage, when he bought a farm near by, where he spent the rest of his life. He was a Deacon of the Congregational church at Webster for forty years. He died April 15, 1883, at the age of eighty-three. His wife, Naomi, a native of Webster, died August 15, 1891, aged eighty-nine. They are survived by two of their children, namely: Mary Ann, whose husband, Sherman Little, died September 20, 1895; and William W., of whom we shall now speak. William W. Austin received his advanced education at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N.H. He lived at home until he was twenty-eight years of...

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Will of Nancy Austin

WILL-Nancy Austin: In the name of God, Amen. I, Nancy Austin of sound mind and disposing memory, but weak in body, do make and publish this as my last will and Testament. In the first place I give to my Grandsons, Fielding Jones and Isaac Vanmeter Jones, a negro girl of the name of Margaritte, and negro boy by the name of Solomon to be equally divided between them when the arrive at the age of 21 years or without lawful issue, then and in that case my will and desire is that the survivor have the aforesaid negroes with their increase and should both die without lawful issue, then and that case my will and desire is that the aforesaid negroes and their increase go to my three children and their lawful heirs. Secondly, I give to my daughter, Harriet Lapham, a negro girl of the name of Mahala, and a boy of the name of Washington, and girl of the name Julian. Thirdly, I give to my son, Daniel Vanmeter, a negro boy of the name of Alexander, and a negro woman of the name of Teresa, and the horses he claims being 3 in number, and 3 steers, and the hogs he claims, and one bed and furniture. Fourthly: I give to my daughter, Helen Jones, a negro girl of the name of Sarah, and a...

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Biographical Sketch of Minot Austin

The sterling citizen whose every thought is for the good of the community, in which he has reared his home and cemented his associations, must always command the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens. Of such metal and commanding such respect, is he whose name is inscribed above. Born in Sacramento, California, in 1853, at an early age he moved with his parents to the Willamette Valley, where he resided until 1867. Coming to Eastern Oregon, he lived in the John Day Valley until 1878. He then moved to his present home, which at that time was still a part of Wasco County, and has since been engaged principally in farming and stock raising. He also is owner of the Sumpter–Canyon City Stage Line, and has a store located at Austin, and aims to carry a stock with which to supply the needs of the surrounding neighborhood. In 1888 he married Linda Edwards. She has personal charge of the hostelry, and her reputation as a caterer is only second to that of Grandma Munra’s of the Log Cabin Eating House at...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Sue Austin

(See Cordery)-Sue, daughter of Charles Harris and Pearl Victoria (Haas) Sisson, born December 14, 1898, at Ft. Gibson; educated at Ft. Gibson, Muskogee and Claremore. Married at Claremore June 5, 1920 Ervin F. son of Henry and Sallie Austin. Mr. Austin is engaged in wholesale dry goods business at Clarmore. Thomas Cordery, an Irishman married Susannah, a full blood Cherokee of the Blind Savannah Clan. Their daughter Nannie married Parker Collins and they were the parents of Jennie Collins who married Charles Harris of Spartanberg district, S. Carolina Charles and Jennie Harris were the parents Narcissa, born in 1841, married George Sisson and Jesse Wolf. She died October 1898. Martha Elizabeth married Captain William Jackson; Sue F. married Alfred M. Charles Joseph and Truste Bird. George and Narcissa Sisson were the parents of Charles Harris Sisson, born December 26, 1859, educated in the Cherokee National schools and married at Ft. Gibson, December 4, 1893 Pearl Victoria Haas, born August 29, 1879 in Tupelo, Lee county, Mississippi. They are the parents of Charles Harris, born November 5, 1894: Jessie May, born July 31, 1896; Sue, born December 1898; Mary, born January 13, 1900 and Emma Pauline, born May 8, 1902. Charles Harris Sisson was appointed Circuit Judge of the Cherokee Nation in May 17, and was elected a member of the tribal council from Illinois District in Aug....

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Slave Narrative of Charity Austin

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Charity Austin Location: 507 South Bloodworth Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: July 27, 1852 Place of Birth: Granville County NC I wus borned in the year 1852, July 27. I wus born in Granville County, sold to a slave speculator at ten years old and carried to Southwest, Georgia. I belonged to Samuel Howard. His daughter took me to Kinston, North Carolina and I stayed there until I wus sold. She married a man named Bill Brown, and her name wus Julia Howard Brown. My father wus named Paul Howard and my mother wus named Chollie Howard. My old missus wus named Polly Howard. John Richard Keine from Danville, Virginia bought me and sent me to a plantation in Georgia. We only had a white overseer there. He and his wife and children lived on the plantation. We had slave quarters there. Slaves were bought up and sent there in chains. Some were chained to each other by the legs, some by the arms. They called the leg chains shackles. I have lived a hard life. I have seen mothers sold away from their babies and other children, and they cryin’ when she left. I have seen husbands sold from their wives, and wives sold from their husbands. Abraham Lincoln came through once, but none of us knew who he wus....

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Biographical Sketch of James A. Austin

James Augustus Austin, clerk of the county court, etc., is a son of James Austin, one of the yeomanry of the county of Peel, and was born in the township of Toronto, in this county, February 5, 1835. The maiden name of his mother was Eleanor Aikins. Both parents are dead. James was reared on the farm, attending a common school in his younger years, and subsequently spending three years at Victoria College, Cobourg, intending at one time to study for the medical profession, but not completing his College course on account of failing health. He continued farming in the township of Toronto until 1867, when he was appointed clerk of the county court, deputy clerk of the Crown, and registrar of the Surrogate Court, at which time he removed to Brampton, the county town. His variety of clerkships he is attending to with the utmost care, being always at his post. While on the farm, he acted part of the time as a director of the local Agricultural Society. Before taking a county office, Mr. Austin interested himself a good deal in the success of the Reform party. He belongs to the Methodist church of Canada, and sustains a consistent christian character. At times, when his health would admit it, he has been a good worker in the Sunday school. November 5, 1868, he married Miss Susan Graham,...

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Slave Narrative of Hannah Austin

Interviewer: Minnie B. Ross Person Interviewed: Hannah Austin Location: Georgia Age: 70-75 When the writer was presented to Mrs. Hannah Austin she was immediately impressed with her alert youthful appearance. Mrs. Austin is well preserved for her age and speaks clearly and with much intelligence. The interview was a brief but interesting one. This was due partly to the fact that Mrs. Austin was a small child when The Civil War ended and too because her family was classed as “town slaves” so classed because of their superior intelligence. Mrs. Austin was a child of ten or twelve years when the war ended. She doesn’t know her exact age but estimated it to be between seventy and seventy five years. She was born the oldest child of Liza and George Hall. Their master Mr. Frank Hall was very kind to them and considerate in his treatment of them. Briefly Mrs. Austin gave the following account of slavery as she knew it. “My family lived in a two room well built house which had many windows and a nice large porch. Our master, Mr. Hall was a merchant and operated a clothing store. Because Mr. Hall lived in town he did not need but a few slaves. My family which included my mother, father, sister, and myself were his only servants. Originally Mr. Hall did not own any slaves, however...

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Slave Narrative of Bill Austin

Interviewer: Martin Richardson Person Interviewed: Bill Austin Location: Greenwood, Florida Bill Austin – he says his name is NOT Williams – is an ex-slave who gained his freedom because his mistress found it more advantageous to free him than to watch him. Austin lives near Greenwood, Jackson County, Florida, on a small farm that he and his children operate. He says that he does not know his age, does not remember ever having heard it. But he must be pretty old, he says, “cause I was a right smart size when Mistuh Smith went off to fight.” He thinks he may be over a hundred – and he looks it – but he is not sure. Austin was born between Greene and Hancock Counties, on the Oconee River, in Georgia. He uses the names of the counties interchangeably; he cannot be definite as to just which one was his birthplace. “The line between ’em was right there by us,” he says. His father was Jack; for want of a surname of his own he took that of his father and called himself Jack Smith. During a temporary shortage of funds on his master’s part, Jack and Bill’s mother was sold to a planter in the northern part of the state. It was not until long after his emancipation that Bill ever saw either of them again. Bill’s father Jack...

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