Surname: Arnold

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Viola Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Allen, Charles F. Wf. Libbie; ch. Ray and Fred. P. O. Gray, R. 1. O. 468.64 ac., sec. 7. (40.) Allen, R. L. Wf. Laura. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 160ac., sec. 7. (20.) Owner, Chas. F. Allen. Anderson, Charles. Ch. Jennie, Fred, Frank and John. P. O. Coon Rapids, R. 3. O. 298.41 ac., sec. 1;O. 40 ac., sec. 12. (27.) Anderson, D. B. Wf. Lillie; ch. Bessie, Nellie, Alice, Mary and Hope. P. O. Audubon, R. 2....

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Melville Township

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Anderson, L. A. Wf. Mathilda; ch.Emmert and Lucile. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 160 ac., sec. 36. (18.) Breeder of Poland China Hogs. Andresen, Christ. Wf. Hansena; ch. Mary, Nina, Emil, Estra, Hu1ga and Hannah. P. O. Audubon,R. 3. R. 240 ac., sec. 26. (22.) Owner, H. M. McClanahan. Andrews, James. Wf. Allie; ch. Lois and Harvey. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 160 ac., sec. 28. (37.) Breeder of Poland China Hogs and Holstein Cattle. Arts, John N....

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Lincoln Township

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Ahrendsen, Herman. Wf. Annie; ch. Lawrence, Arthur, Alta. P. O. Manning, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 7; O. 80 ac., sec. 8. (9.) Aikman, Geo. R. Wf. Mae; ch. Ethel M. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 26. (38.) Aikman, R. F. Wf. Jennie; ch. Vera, Floyd, Olive, Donald and Myron. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 24. (34.) Asmus, Fred. Wf. Edith; ch. Dwight, Hazel and Harry. P. O. Audubon, R. 1....

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Greeley Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Adair, C. W. Wf. Bertha; ch. Florence, Maxine, Don. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 24. (37.) Anderson, E. H. Wf. Christina; ch. Russell. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. R. 153.91 ac., sec. 5. (20.) Owner, J. F. Mortinson. Artist, Dan’l. Wf. Sarah; ch. Ada, Sadie, George, John, Elmer, Anna, Clara, Madge, Robert. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 2.5; O. 40 ac., sec. 36. Artist, John H. Wf. Mamie; ch. Homer, Hugh, Helen,...

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Cameron Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Aikman, C. M. Wf. Alma. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 160 ac., sec. 6. (26.) Breeder of Short Horn Cattle. Owner, W. F. Aikman. Aikman, W. F. Wf. Nettie; ch. Glen, Fern, Lloyd and Gladys. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 260 ac., sec. 7; R. 240 ac., sec. 8; O. 160 ac., sec. 6. (40.) Breeder of Short Horn Cattle. Owner, J. F. Liken. Albertsen, M. and A. Hansen. P. O. Gray, R. 1.R. 400 ac., sec. 21....

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History of Seneca County New York

This history of Seneca County, New York published in 1876, provides a look at the first 75 years of existence for this county, with numerous chapters devoted to it’s early history. The value of this manuscript may be found in the etched engravings found throughout of idyllic scenes of Seneca County including portraits of men, houses, buildings, farms, and scenery. Included are 35 biographies of early settlers, and histories of the individual townships along with lists of men involved in the Union Army during the Civil War on a township by township basis.

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Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to...

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Biography of Doctor Joseph Lewis

Doctor Lewis was the son of William and Naomi Lewis was born at Old Lyme, Connecticut, in November, 1746, and came to Norwich, Vermont, in 1767. During his minority young Lewis showed a fondness for the study of medicine and devoted much of his time during the last years previous to his leaving Connecticut to the study of that science. After settling in Norwich he devoted a year or two to further study, after which he commenced the practice of medicine and continued in practice for more than fifty-five years. During a large portion of this time (from 1785 to 1820) his practice was large, and extended not only through Norwich but into Thetford, Sharon, Hartford and Strafford in Vermont, and to Lebanon, Hanover and Lyme, New Hampshire. The larger part of this practice was performed on horseback. In the winter when the roads became impassable for horses, the doctor resorted to snow shoes, guided through the wilderness by blazed trees; always ready to do what he could to relieve the suffering and the ills of the settlers of those days. No plea of inclement weather or poor health was made in order to shirk his duty in visiting the sick. The poor and destitute were welcome to his services and none who showed a desire to pay were pressed to do so. Doctor Lewis was married in 1771...

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The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and...

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Slave Narrative of George W. Arnold

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: George W. Arnold Location: Evansville, Indiana Place of Birth: Bedford County, Tennessee Date of Birth: April 7, 1861 Occupation: porter in a wholesale feed store This is written from an interview with each of the following: George W. Arnold, Professor W.S. Best of the Lincoln High School and Samuel Bell, all of Evansville, Indiana. George W. Arnold was born April 7, 1861, in Bedford County, Tennessee. He was the property of Oliver P. Arnold, who owned a large farm or plantation in Bedford county. His mother was a native of Rome, Georgia, where she remained until twelve years of age, when she was sold at auction. Oliver Arnold bought her, and he also purchased her three brothers and one uncle. The four negroes were taken along with other slaves from Georgia to Tennessee where they were put to work on the Arnold plantation. On this plantation George W. Arnold was born and the child was allowed to live in a cabin with his relatives and declares that he never heard one of them speak an unkind word about Master Oliver Arnold or any member of his family. “Happiness and contentment and a reasonable amount of food and clothes seemed to be all we needed,” said the now white-haired man. Only a limited memory of Civil War days is retained by the old man but...

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Clark Co., Ky

CLARK CO. (Mayme Nunnelley) The first records of Slaves in Clark County was given by a descendant of one of the members of the little band of resolute Revolutionary soldiers who had been comrades and mess mates throughout the long bloody war. These fifteen families, some from Virginia and others from Maryland, started westward in the early spring of 1783 for Kentucky. They bought with them some horses, a few cattle, thirty or forty slaves and a few necessary household articles. After many hardships and trials, borne heroically by both men and women, they halted on the banks of the Big Stoner, in what is now the eastern part of Clark County. Two years later another group of families with their slaves came to join this little settlement. In some cases the owners were good to their slaves had comfortable quarters for them at a reasonable distance from the main house. Their clothing was given them as they needed it. In most instances the clothing was made on the plantation Material woven, and shoes made. The cabins were one and two rooms, maybe more if the families were large. The slaves ate their meals in the kitchen of the main house. A cruel and inhuman master was ostrazied and taught by the silent contempt of his neighbors a lesson which he seldom failed to learn. In 1789 the general...

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Biography of Andrew Arnold

One of the old and substantial business houses of Topeka is that now conducted under the style of Arnold Drug Company, an establishment which had been operated by father and son. This business was founded nearly forty-seven years ago by the late Andrew Arnold, who same here as a poor young man and subsequently advanced to a substantial position in business circles and to a leading place in civic affairs. Andrew J. Arnold was born in 1845, at Columbus, the county seat of Bartholomew County, Indiana, a son of Ephraim Arnold, whe was a pioneer of Indiana and prominent in politics at an early day. Ephraim Arnold married a Miss Perry, who was a near relative of Commodore Perry. After attending the public schools of Columbus, Andrew J. Arnold commended a course at the Indiana State University, but before be had completed his eduention enlisted, when yet but a lad, in Company G, Second Indiana Cavalry for service in the Civil war. He served gallantly with that regiment until captured by the enemy, when he was confined at Andersonville, and although he escaped from the stockade ou a number of occasions was always recaptured, and continued to be held a prisoner until exchanged. When his military service was completed, he returned to the university, from which he was duly graduated. Feeling that there were better opportnuities awaiting him in...

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Biographical Sketch of Edgar C. Arnold

Edgar C. Arnold was born in the city of which he is now a resident August 18, 1872, and had always made his home at Topeka. He received his primary edneation in the city schools, attended Washhurn College for two years, and was then a student at the Kansas State University for a like period. With this preparation he embarked in the drug business with his father, under the style of A. J. Arnold & Son, and at the time of his father’s death succeeded to the business. In 1899 it was incorporated as the Arnold Drug Company, and as such had since remained. The business was formerly confined to the retail trade, but under Mr. Arnold’s management had extended its scope so as to take care of wholesale business as well, and in both departments had shown a rapid and steady development. Other enterprises and institutions have had the benefit of Mr. Arnold’s business judgment, foresight and acumen, and at this time he is identified with the State Savings Bank and the Citizens Bank as a director; the Capitol Building and Loan Association as vice president and director; the Elmhurst Investment Company as a director; and the Shawnee Investment Company as vice president and a director. He is a Democrat, but his heavy business interests have allowed him to take no more than a good eitizen’s participation in...

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Slave Narrative of Lou Smith

Person Interviewed: Lou Smith Location: Platter, Oklahoma Age: 83 Occupation: Nursing Young Sho’, I remembers de slavery days! I was a little gal but I can tell you lots of things about dem days. My job was nussing de younguns. I took keer of them from daylight to dark. I’d have to sing them to sleep too. I’d sing: By-lo Baby Bunting Daddy’s gone a-hunting To get a rabbit skin To wrap Baby Bunting in.” Sometimes I’d sing: Rock-a-bye baby, in a tree top When de wind blows your cradle’ll rock. When de bough breaks de crad’ll fall Down comes baby cradle’n all.” My father was Jackson Longacre and he was born in Mississippi. My mother, Caroline, was born in South Carolina. Both of them was born slaves. My father belonged to Huriah Longacre. He had a big plantation and lots of niggers. He put up a lot of his slaves as security on a debt and he took sick and died so they put them all on de block and sold them. My father and his mother (my grandma) was sold together. My old Mistress bought my grandmother and old Mistress’ sister bought my grandma’s sister. These white women agreed that they would never go off so far that the two slave women couldn’t see each other. They allus kept this promise. A Mr. Covington offered old Master...

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Biographical Sketch of E. B. Arnold

Arnold, E. B. (See Grant, Ghigau and Adair) Ernest Brigham Arnold, born May 2, 1884. Educated at Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennessee from which he graduated with the LLB. degree in 1905. He married Clyde Horn, horn Aug. 23, 1888. She graduated fro Female Seminary May 31, 1906. They’ are the parents of: Hamilton Laverne born June 28, 1912 and Thomas Brigham Arnold, born Jan. 11, 1914. Ernest Brigham Arnold was elected County Attorney of Adair Co. in 1907 and District Judge of the First District in 1918 and resigned from that position on August 1st, 1921 in order that he might ressume his law practice. James Warren Adair married Susanah Deborah Bean and their daughter Minerva Cornelia, married Thomas H. Horn and they were the parents of Mrs. E. B....

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