Surname: Anderson

Biography of O. W. Anderson

O. W. ANDERSON. Among all the industries that are carried on in any community, none succeed so well as the ones that are conducted by practical men. An instance in mind is the success attained by O. W. Anderson, who is a member of the firm of Anderson & Keightley, practical blacksmiths, of Billings, Missouri. He was born in Erie County, Penn., November 18, 1850, was reared and educated in Crawford County of that state, and there also learned his trade. His parents were Robert and Harriet (Yates) Anderson, the former of whom was born in the State of New York, soon after his mother had landed in this country from Scotland, his father having died on the ocean en route, and was buried at sea. Robert Anderson died in Ohio, but his widow survives him. Their union resulted in the birth of eleven children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth. Just at the time when O. W. Anderson should have been in school, the great Civil War came up and he was compelled to leave school to earn his living. At the age of thirteen years he bought his time of his father for $300 and started in business as a saw miller, an occupation which he followed until 1869, when he began learning the blacksmith’s trade, serving an apprenticeship...

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Slave Narrative of Josephine Anderson

Interviewer: Jules A. Frost Person Interviewed: Josephine Anderson Location: Tampa, Florida “I kaint tell nothin bout slavery times cept what I heared folks talk about. I was too young to remember much but I recleck seein my granma milk de cows an do de washin. Granpa was old, an dey let him do light work, mosly fish an hunt. “I doan member nothin bout my daddy. He died when I was a baby. My stepfather was Stephen Anderson, an my mammy’s name was Dorcas. He come fum Vajinny, but my mammy was borned an raised in Wilmington. My name was Josephine Anderson fore I married Willie Jones. I had two half-brothers youngern me, John Henry an Ed, an a half-sister, Elsie. De boys had to mind de calves an sheeps, an Elsie nursed de missus’ baby. I done de cookin, mosly, an helped my mammy spin. “I was ony five year old when dey brung me to Sanderson, in Baker County, Florida. My stepfather went to work for a turpentine man, makin barrels, an he work at dat job till he drop dead in de camp. I reckon he musta had heart disease. “I doan recleck ever seein my mammy wear shoes. Even in de winter she go barefoot, an I reckon cold didn’t hurt her feet no moran her hands an face. We all wore dresses made o’...

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Slave Narrative of W. A. Anderson

Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person Interviewed: W. A. Anderson (dark brown) Location: 3200 W. 18th Street, Little Rock, Arkansas Age: 78 Occupation: House and yard man [HW: Serves the “Lawd”] “I don’t know nothin’ about slavery. You know I wouldn’t know nothin’ bout it cause I was only four years old when the war ended. All I know is I was born in slavery; but I don’t know nothin’ bout it. “I don’t remember nothin’ of my parents. Times was all confused and old folks didn’t talk before chilun. They didn’t have time. Besides, my mother and father were separated. “I was born in Arkansas and have lived here all my life. But I don’t gossip and entertain. I just moved in this house last week. Took a wheelbarrow and brought all these things here myself. “Those boys out there jus’ threw a stone against the house. I thought the house was falling. I work all day and when night comes, I’m tired. “I don’t have no wife, no children, nothin’; nobody to help me out. I don’t ask the neighbors nothin’ cept to clear out this junk they left here. “I ain’t goin’ to talk about the Ku Klux. I got other things to think about. It takes all my time and strength to do my work and live a Christian. Folks got so nowadays they don’t care...

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Slave Narrative of Selie Anderson

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Selie Anderson Location: Holly Grove, Arkansas Age: 78 Occupation: House girl “I was born near Decatur, Alabama and lived there till I was fifteen years old. Course I members hearin’ em talk bout Mars Newt. I named fur my ma’s old mistress—Miss Selie Thompson and Mars Newt Thompson. Pa died when I was three years old. He was a soldier. Ma had seven children. They have bigger families then than they have now. Ma name Emmaline Thompson. Pa name Sam Adair. I can’t tell you about him. I heard em say his pa was a white man. He was light skinned. Old folks didn’t talk much foe children so I don’t know well nough to tell you bout him. Ma was a cook and a licensed midwife in Alabama. She waited on both black and white. Ma never staid at home much. She worked out. I come to Mississippi after I married and had one child. Ma and all come. Ma went to Tom McGehee’s to cook after freedom. She married old man named Lewis Chase and they worked on where he had been raised. His name was Lewis Sprangle. He looked after the stock and drove the carriage. Daniel Sprangle had a store and a big farm. He had three girls and three boys, I was their house girl. Mama lived on...

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Slave Narrative of Sarah Anderson

Interviewer: Mrs. Bernice Bowden Person Interviewed: Sarah Anderson Location: 3815 W. Second Avenue, Pine Bluff, Arkansas Age: 78? “I don’t know when I was born. When the Civil War ended, I was bout four or five years old. “I jes’ remember when the people come back—the soldiers—when the War ended. We chillun run under the house. That was the Yankees. “I was born in Bibb County, Georgia. That’s where I was bred and born. “I been in Arkansas ever since I was fourteen. That was shortly after the Civil War, I reckon. We come here when they was emigratin’ to Arkansas. I’m tellin’ you the truth, I been here a long time. “I member when the soldiers went by and we chillun run under the house. It was the Yankee cavalry, and they made so much noise. Dat’s what the old folks told us. I member dat we run under the house and called our self hidin’. “My master was Madison Newsome and my missis was Sarah Newsome. Named after her? Must a done it. Ma and her chillun was out wallowin’ in the dirt when the Yankees come by. Sometimes I stayed in the house with my white folks all night. “My mother and father say they was well treated. That’s what they say. “Old folks didn’t low us chillun round when they was talkin’ bout their business,...

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Slave Narrative of R. B. Anderson

Interviewer: Samuel S. Taylor Person Interviewed: R. B. Anderson Location: Route 4, Box 69 (near Granite), Little Rock, Arkansas Age: 76 Occupation: Grocer, bartender, porter, general work [HW: The Brooks-Baxter War] “I was born in Little Rock along about Seventeenth and Arch Streets. There was a big plantation there then. Dr. Wright owned the plantation. He owned my mother and father. My father and mother told me that I was born in 1862. They didn’t know the date exactly, so I put it the last day in the year and call it December 30, 1862. “My father’s name was William Anderson. He didn’t go to the War because he was blind. He was ignorant too. He was colored. He was a pretty good old man when he died. “My mother’s name was Minerva Anderson. She was three-fourths Indian, hair way down to her waist. I was in Hot Springs blacking boots when my mother died. I was only about eight or ten years old then. I always regretted I wasn’t able to do anything for my mother before she died. I don’t know to what tribe her people belonged. “Dr. Wright was awful good to his slaves. “I don’t know just how freedom came to my folks. I never heard my father say. They were set free, I know. They were set free when the War ended. They never...

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Slave Narrative of Charles Anderson

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Charles Anderson Location: Helena, Arkansas Age: 77 or 78, not sure “I was born in Bloomfield, Kentucky. My parents had the same owners. Mary and Elgin Anderson was their names. They was owned by Isaac Stone. Davis Stone was their son. They belong to the Stones as far back as they could remember. Mama was darker than I am. My father was brighter than I am. He likely had a white father. I never inquired. Mama had colored parents. Master Stone walked with a big crooked stick. He nor his son never went to war. Masters in that country never went. Two soldiers were drafted off our place. I saw the soldiers, plenty of them and plenty times. There never was no serious happenings. “The Federal soldiers would come by, sleep in the yard, take our best horses and leave the broken down ones. Very little money was handled. I never seen much. Master Stone would give us money like he give money to Davis. They prized fine stock mostly. They needed money at wheat harvest time only. When a celebration or circus come through he give us all twenty-five or thirty cents and told us to go. There wasn’t many slaves up there like down in this country. The owners from all I’ve heard was crueler and sold them off oftener here....

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Biography of Andrew B. Anderson

Mr. Anderson, who is president of the Weiser Bank, at Weiser, and chairman of the board of commissioners of Washington County, dates his residence in Idaho from 1869. He is a native of Kentucky, his birth having occurred in Louisville, February 21, 1846. He is of Scotch-Irish ancestry, the family having been founded in America by Thomas Anderson, the grandfather, who crossed the Atlantic in early manhood, taking up his residence in Kentucky. He aided his adopted country in the war of 1812, and also participated in the battles with the Indians during the early settlement of the “dark and bloody ground.” He married a Miss Henry, a native of that state, and their son Joseph, father of our subject, was born and reared in Kentucky. He married Miss Rachel Henry, a distant relative of his mother, and in 1848 removed with his family to Missouri. They continued their westward journey in 1860, when the father, accompanied by his wife and four children, started across the plains to California. He took up his abode in Butte County, and there resided until his death, which occurred in the sixty-fifth year of his age, while his wife lived to be fifty-five years of age. Three of their children still survive, two being residents of the Golden state. Andrew Bradley Anderson was only two years of age when the family went to...

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Biography of Louis N. B. Anderson

Fortunate is the man who has back of him an ancestry honorable and distinguished, and happy is he whose lines of life are cast in harmony therewith. In person, in character and talents, Mr. Anderson is a worthy scion of his race. Though his life has been one rather of modest reserve than of ambitious self-seeking, he has shown himself a peer of the brightest men of his adopted state, and his mental talents led to his selection for the important position of superintendent of public instruction of Idaho for the years 1897 and 1898, in which capacity he served with distinction. For several generations his ancestors have devoted their energies to the advancement of intellectual acquirements among their fellow men. His great-grandfather, a native of Denmark, followed school teaching in his native land prior to his emigration to America. The latter event occurred, however, in the colonial period of our country, and he aided in the struggle which brought to the nation her independence. He afterward erected a schoolhouse, and conducted a private school throughout the remainder of his life. He was born December 22, 1747, and died in 1834, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. His son, Allen Anderson, the grandfather of our subject, was born in North Carolina, in 1777, and he likewise devoted his life to educational work. He married a Miss Evans, and...

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Biography of James H. Anderson

James H. Anderson, whose term as state auditor of Idaho expired at the beginning of the present year (1899), was born in Platte County, Missouri, on the 4th of October 1845. His ancestors were early settlers of Virginia and were participants in that struggle which ended in the overthrow of British rule in the colonies and the establishment of the United States of America. In the year 1818 his grandfather emigrated to Kentucky, at which time George W. Anderson, father of our subject, was only about six years of age. His birth had occurred in the Old Dominion in 181 2, and he remained in Kentucky until 1837, when he removed to Platte county, Missouri, where he industriously and successfully carried on agricultural pursuits. In Kentucky he married Miss Mary Roberts, and to them were born six children, five of whom are yet living. The father attained the age of eighty-six years, and the mother passed away at the age of seventy-three. Both were consistent members of the Methodist church, and had the high regard of many friends. James Harvey Anderson, their second child, was educated in the public schools and at Pleasant Ridge College and in Spaulding’s Commercial College, at Kansas City, pursued a business course and a course in commercial law, holding diplomas as a graduate of both departments. On laying aside his textbooks he returned to...

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Biography of Robert J. Anderson

A glance at the history of past centuries will indicate at once what would be the condition of the world if the mining interests no longer had a part in the industrial and commercial life. Only a few centuries ago agriculture was almost the only occupation of man. A landed proprietor surrounded himself with his tenants and his serfs who tilled his broad fields, while he reaped the reward of their labors; but when the rich mineral resources of the world were placed upon the market industry found its way into new and broader fields, minerals were used in the production of thousands of new articles of trade and in the production of hundreds of inventions, and the business of nations was revolutionized when considering these facts we can in a measure determine the value to mankind of the mining interests. One who is now prominently connected with the development of the rich mineral resources of the northwest is Mr. Anderson, whose name heads this sketch, the promoter and the organizer of the Twin Springs Placer Mining Company. A native of Minnesota, Mr. Anderson was born in the town of Eden Prairie, February 19, 1856 and in 1894 came to Idaho, since which time he has been engaged in developing the great mining enterprise, of which he has since been the manager, and which he has brought to successful...

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Biographical Sketch of Alfred J. Anderson

Anderson, Alfred J.; division freight agent, Baltimore & Ohio R. R.; born, Butler, Pa., Jan. 17, 1870; son of Samuel and Drusilla C. Harper Anderson; educated, public schools Butler and Prospect Academy, Prospect, Pa.; married, Washington, D. C., Feb. 15, 1900, Florence E. Wynne; one daughter, Anna Elizabeth; May 1, 1890, entered the service of the Baltimore & Ohio R. R.; clerk in general freight office, Pittsburgh, till March, 1891; March, 1891, to March, 1896, sec’y to gem freight agent, Pittsburgh; March, 1896, to July, 1905, sec’y to freight traffic mgr., at Baltimore; July, 1905, to Feb., 1907, division freight agt., at Columbus, O.; since Feb. 1907, division freight agt.,...

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Robert Banks Anderson

1st Lt., Co. A, 28th Infantry, 1st Div. Born in Wilson County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Anderson. Entered the service May 15, 1917, at Wilson, N.C. Was sent to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., May 15, 1917. Sailed for France Oct. 8, 1917. Promoted to rank of First Lieutenant August 15, 1917. Fought at Cantigny. Was in America’s first attack. Killed at Cantigny May 29, 1918, buried in Grave 153, U S. Military Cemetery, Bonviller Oise, France. Received distinguished service cross. He was graduated from Trinity College in 1914. His three brothers were also in the...

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Biographical Sketch of John Anderson

John Anderson, of England, had a son John, who married Letitia Stewart. They also had a son John, who married Jane Clark, and they had-Gustavus A., William E., Theresa J., Robert S., Eliza C., and John W. Gustavus A. graduated in medicine, and settled in Missouri in 1836. He was married first to Jemima E. Fisher, and after her death to Mary A. Talbott, daughter of Major Kit Talbott, of Loutre...

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Biography of William E. H. Anderson

William E. H. Anderson. The importance of the practical real estate man to any community is very well demonstrated in the recognition which he receives in his locality, a recognition which is based upon his activities in developing his city and county and of interesting outside capital in its realty. While, unfortunately, there are some who take an unfair advantage of their position, the men who really succeed are those whose advice and recommendations can be depended upon by investors. Cherryvale is one of the communities which has been largely built up by this class of men, among whom, in a prominent position, stands William E. H. Anderson, who has occupied a leading place in real estate and insurance circles here since his advent in 1895. Mr. Anderson was born at Danville, the county seat of Vermilion County, Illinois, June 1, 1861, and is a son of John F. and Ordella (Fairchilds) Anderson. The branch of the Anderson family to which he belongs originated in Ireland, and the first emigrant to America was his great-grandfather. His grandfather was William Anderson, who was born in 1795 and who became a pioneer into Vermilion County, Illinois, where he located during Indian days and experienced all the dangers and hardships incident to the life of the intrepid settlers opening up a new country and paving the way for civilization. Mr. Anderson was...

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