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Surname: Anderson

Biography of Alexander R. Anderson

Alexander R., Anderson, manager and treasurer of the Racine Hosiery Company, has back of him twenty years’ experience in all departments of the mill and is therefore most competent to control the enlarging and developing interests of this concern. The work is thoroughly systematized and everything done in a most methodical manner, so that there is no useless expenditure of time, labor or material. It is a well recognized fact that this economy of forces is the basis of all modern business success. Mr. Anderson was born in Lewiston, Maine, April 16, 1878, a son of Walter R. and Margaret (Murray) Anderson, both of whom are natives of Scotland, and on leaving the land of hills and heather came to the United States in the spring of 1867. The father has always been engaged in the knitting business save for a period of five years, which he spent in the manufacture of blankets. In 1894 he became a resident of Kenosha, Wisconsin, and has been with the Chicago-Kenosha Hosiery Company for the past twenty-two years, occupying a position of large responsibility, in charge of the finishing and dyeing department. Through the steps of an orderly progression he has worked his way up in business circles and is now a leading figure in the manufacturing interests of Kenosha. Both he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church and...

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Biography of Robert L. Anderson

Robert L. Anderson, who is engaged in blacksmithing in Caledonia, was born in Denmark, December 3, 1871, a son of Robert L. and Sophia (Shenberg) Anderson. The father was born in Denmark, March 20, 1815, and the mother’s birth occurred in Germany, February 20, 1843. Mr. Anderson became a detective of Odense, Denmark, and for twenty-eight years and three months he was connected with the military organization of his country, participating in the wars of 1848-50 and in the war of 1864. He died in Denmark, January 24, 1881, and in 1895 the mother came to Racine, where she is still living. In their family were eight children, of whom five survive: Fred. a blacksmith of Emory, Wisconsin; Robert L.; Thor, living in Racine; George, assistant chief of the Case Fire Department of Racine; and Alexander, who is a clothing salesman in Racine. The religious faith of the family is that of the Lutheran church. It was in the year 1889 that Robert L. Anderson came to Racine, being then a youth of eighteen years. He worked for five months on a farm near Union Grove, after which he removed to Norway Township and was employed by a cousin in a blacksmith shop. In 1908 he located in Kilbourn, where he entered a blacksmith shop, where he has since worked. Almost his entire life has been devoted to the...

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Biography of Captain R. W. Anderson

No history of Pulaski County would be complete without a sketch of that prominent and beloved citizen, Captain Ruel W. Anderson, son of Robert S. and Sallie Wooten Anderson, who was born near Hawkinsville, October 6, 1837, and died May 27, 1903. He was one of thirteen children, nine of whom reached the age of maturity five girls and four boys. He was reared and educated in Pulaski County. He was married while on furlough, February 4, 1864, to Mrs. R. W. Anderson. Agnes Merritt, only daughter of Simon and Maria Merritt, of Stonington, Conn. She died September 2, 1900. Unwavering in her devotion to her Lord, and matchless in her never failing fidelity to her family was she. “No painter’s brush, nor poet’s pen, In justice to her fame, Has ever reached half high enough T o write a Mother’s name.” “ Captain Anderson often spoke of her as `’The Planter’s Northern Bride.” He answered the call of the State in July 1861, and organized a company of artillery known as Anderson’s Battery. He was soon elected captain, a rank in which he proved himself a skillful and able officer. His bride went with him to Tennessee, and from her carriage on Missionary Ridge saw Captain Anderson lead his men into the Battle of Lookout. He was wounded three times, but not seriously, at New Hope Church, at...

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Biography of Joe J. Anderson

Joe J. Anderson, son of Robert Sanders and Sallie Wooten Anderson, was born near Hawkinsville, March 10, 1846, and died September 3, 1926. He married Laura Sheppard of Hawkinsville, Georgia, June 25, 1867. He was a Mason, was reared to agricultural pursuits, and became a large landowner and planter. At sixteen years of age he answered the call to arms, and served four years in Company B, Fourteenth Georgia Artillery, as flag-bearer. In battle at Griswoldville his flagstaff was shot into splinters. He stood on his horse and held the flag high above his head, using his body as a flagstaff, when his horse was killed and fell upon the rider’s legs. Word was passed to his brother, Captain Anderson, and his aides rushed to him, and, thinking he was killed, replaced his horse. He arose, however, and proceeded to hold the flag as before. There were six children: Chas. C. Anderson, a prominent and successful druggist of Huntsville, Ala., who married Leila Worthem Coles of Huntsville. From that union was one daughter, Mrs. Lucile Coles Anderson Hertzler. Council Anderson married Bessie Watson of Hawkinsville. They had seven children: Douglas, Gertrude, Elizabeth, Ruth, Charlie, Estha, and Laura. Carl Sanders Anderson, a successful and beloved druggist of Huntsville, was born November 7, 1877, and died January 27, 1904. Sallylu Anderson married Howard Worthem Coles of Huntsville. They had one daughter,...

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Biography of John Laurens Anderson

John Laurens Anderson, son of Robert Saunders Anderson and Sarah Wooten Anderson, was born in Pulaski County, February 25, 1848. It was a happy day in his boyhood when his father gave him a sizeable bill to purchase his choice of books at an auction sale of a private library of classics. Naturally studious, from these books he gained more than ordinary knowledge of standard literature and command of the English language. He joined the Confederate Army in his fourteenth year, Company H, Seventh Georgia Reserve Regiment, was severely wounded at Griswoldville, carrying the bullet in his leg thereafter. Standing six feet two inches, a perfect physical specimen, he never lost the military bearing obtained from his training in such early years. In 1869 he married Johnnie Booth, who lived but a short time, leaving a daughter, Julia. In 1871 he married Addie Boon, of Perry, Ga. Five children were born of this marriage, three of whom died in infancy. John Laurens II, feed manufacturer of St. Louis, Mo., married Evelyn Lovejoy of Hawkinsville in 1907. Born of this union is one son, John L. Anderson III. Allene, youngest born, married William Conner McAllister of Mount Vernon, Ga., in 1908. They have one son, John Anderson McAllister, born in 1910. In 1883 his second wife died. He gave up farming and was connected with the State Agricultural Department for...

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Biography of Captain Robert Sanders Anderson

Captain Robert Sanders Anderson, youngest son of John I. and Maridley Mayo Anderson, was born in Pulaski County, July 7, 1842. When just a boy he enlisted in Company K, 49th Georgia Infantry, Lee’s Army, of the War Between the States. In a short time, for his bravery, he was commissioned First Lieutenant, then Captain, and at the close of the war was acting as Colonel, his colonel having been killed in battle. At the Seven Days’ Battle, near Richmond, the latter part of June, 1862, he was wounded in the arm, but was soon back with his company. At the Battle of the Wilderness, on May 6, 1864, he was again wounded. While home on a furlough, he was married on August 3, 1864, to Charity Frances Brown, daughter of James Williams and Janie Kendrick Brown. The heart of this young bride of seventeen was touched by the needs of the Southern soldiers, and she was active in all war relief work. On one occasion she furnished the uniform of the chaplain of her husband’s company in order that he might continue his good work among the soldiers of that company. Captain Anderson was with Lee at the surrender at Appomattox on April 12, 1865, at which time he was presented with his sword, which has remained a cherished possession of this family. The railroads having been demolished...

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Biography of Peyton Tooke Anderson

Eugene, William Thomas, and Peyton Tooke Anderson and their seven sisters are claimed as sons and daughters of Pulaski County. The three men are publishing the Macon Telegraph and the Macon News, while their sisters have married and are, with three exceptions, living; in Macon. In 1878 Christopher Cohen Anderson and his wife, Laura Tooke Anderson, decided that schooling advantages were too poor at Houston Factory, and their children should get a better showing in life. Mr. Anderson had gone to the Factory from Hayneville to look after the office work of the big enterprise that Joseph Tooke had developed there before the War Between the States. Farming as a sideline was also a part of the program. But Hawkinsville held a lure for Mr. Anderson, who had studied law and thought he would like to practice. The sisters are: Mrs. Leila Anderson Key, with G. S. C. W. at Milledgeville; Marie Louise (Mrs. Harry A. Gibson), Macon; Alma (Mrs. Orren Massey), Macon; Julia Mason (Mrs. W. N. Northrop), Minneapolis, Minn.; Myrta (Mrs. Walter Massey), Macon; Louise, Macon; and Katherine, Washington, D. C. But at Hawkinsville the family circle continued to increase, money was scarce, panics were constant, and the three boys went to work in the printing office of the Hawkinsville Dispatch under George P. Woods. Eugene, the eldest, was only fourteen, and he was the first one...

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Biography of Eugene Anderson

Eugene, William Thomas, and Peyton Tooke Anderson and their seven sisters are claimed as sons and daughters of Pulaski County. The three men are publishing the Macon Telegraph and the Macon News, while their sisters have married and are, with three exceptions, living; in Macon. In 1878 Christopher Cohen Anderson and his wife, Laura Tooke Anderson, decided that schooling advantages were too poor at Houston Factory, and their children should get a better showing in life. Mr. Anderson had gone to the Factory from Hayneville to look after the office work of the big enterprise that Joseph Tooke had developed there before the War Between the States. Farming as a sideline was also a part of the program. But Hawkinsville held a lure for Mr. Anderson, who had studied law and thought he would like to practice. The sisters are: Mrs. Leila Anderson Key, with G. S. C. W. at Milledgeville; Marie Louise (Mrs. Harry A. Gibson), Macon; Alma (Mrs. Orren Massey), Macon; Julia Mason (Mrs. W. N. Northrop), Minneapolis, Minn.; Myrta (Mrs. Walter Massey), Macon; Louise, Macon; and Katherine, Washington, D. C. But at Hawkinsville the family circle continued to increase, money was scarce, panics were constant, and the three boys went to work in the printing office of the Hawkinsville Dispatch under George P. Woods. Eugene, the eldest, was only fourteen, and he was the first one...

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Biography of Eugene Anderson

Eugene, William Thomas, and Peyton Tooke Anderson and their seven sisters are claimed as sons and daughters of Pulaski County. The three men are publishing the Macon Telegraph and the Macon News, while their sisters have married and are, with three exceptions, living; in Macon. In 1878 Christopher Cohen Anderson and his wife, Laura Tooke Anderson, decided that schooling advantages were too poor at Houston Factory, and their children should get a better showing in life. Mr. Anderson had gone to the Factory from Hayneville to look after the office work of the big enterprise that Joseph Tooke had developed there before the War Between the States. Farming as a sideline was also a part of the program. But Hawkinsville held a lure for Mr. Anderson, who had studied law and thought he would like to practice. The sisters are: Mrs. Leila Anderson Key, with G. S. C. W. at Milledgeville; Marie Louise (Mrs. Harry A. Gibson), Macon; Alma (Mrs. Orren Massey), Macon; Julia Mason (Mrs. W. N. Northrop), Minneapolis, Minn.; Myrta (Mrs. Walter Massey), Macon; Louise, Macon; and Katherine, Washington, D. C. But at Hawkinsville the family circle continued to increase, money was scarce, panics were constant, and the three boys went to work in the printing office of the Hawkinsville Dispatch under George P. Woods. Eugene, the eldest, was only fourteen, and he was the first one...

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Biographical Sketch of John Anderson

John Anderson, of the firm of Anderson & Olson, dealers in boots, shoes, rubbers, etc., opposite High School building, was born in Sweden in 1843; came to America in 1869, and settled in Sioux City; married Anna Anderson. They have four children-Mary, Albert, Carrie and...

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Biographical Sketch of C.M. Anderson

C.M. Anderson, photographer, was born in Sweden in 1849, came to America n 1852, and located in Chicago. In 1871, he moved to Rock Island, Ill. While there he took charge of a gallery, and learned the art of photography. He came to Sioux City in 1878; married Bertha Jorgenson, of Manitowoc, Wis. They have two children-Emineretta and John...

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Biographical Sketch of Abel Anderson

Abel Anderson, dealer in groceries and provisions, corner of 4th and Jackson Sts., was born in Sweden in 1856; came to America in 1874, and settled in Sioux City. He is now one of the leading grocers of the city; his sales average $25,000 per...

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Biographical Sketch of John P. Anderson

John P. Anderson, farmer, Section 30, P. O. Oakland, is a native of Sweden; in 1857, came to Moline, Ill.; afterward removed to Richland Grove; in 1861, came to Rock Island; there married Miss Matilda Shenstrom, who was born in Sweden; came with her parents to Illinois when a child of two years; they have two children–one son and one daughter. In the spring of 1866, they came to Menona County, Iowa; in June, 1866, they removed to Nebraska and located on the farm, consisting of 160 acres; they boarded with John Oak while he was erecting a cabin, which was the first cabin built north of Oakland, except one built by Josiah Everett a short time before. He drew up a petition giving this precinct the name of Oakland, which was presented to the County Commissioners, and by them approved and adopted. He was one of four who first came to this precinct, except John Oak, who had been here about four months before. In the summer of 1867, the post office was established in Oakland; John Oak was appointed Postmaster, and Mr. Anderson was his assistant. This farm has now a grove of about twelve acres northwest of his house, about three hundred apple trees south of his house, with about a mile of shade trees planted round his farm, which is now one of the most...

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Biographical Sketch of James Anderson

James Anderson settled in the south-west part of the town, on the farm now occupied by Roderick Fuller, where he died April 14, 1832, aged 62, and his wife, Electa Kelsey, Sept. 2, 1848, aged 74. His son Stephen also died in this town May 2, 1853, aged 55. Richard Jackson settled at a very early day at Sherburne Four Corners, where his father kept a tavern. He died in the first house north of the corners, Jan. 17, 1821, aged 67, and Sarah, his wife, Oct. 20, 1834, aged 74. John Smith settled on the Cyrus Hartwell farm, where he was killed in his door-yard by a young team, Aug. 16, 1810, aged 49. His wife, Lydia, survived him many years. She died July 14, 1854, aged 84. Jeremy Warriner and Benjamin Lyon settled at Sherburne Four Corners, where the latter died Nov. 10, 1854, aged 87, and Hannah, his first wife, May 16, 1806, aged 35, and Debora, his second wife Nov. 10, 1859, aged 80. Warriner removed to Hamilton and died there Jan. 14, 1868, aged 83. Simeon Paddleford erected in 1804 the first machine for carding wool, a mile below Sherburne village. This is said to have been one of the two first machines in the...

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Biography of Hon. John H. Anderson

HON. JOHN H. ANDERSON. This part of Missouri has proved a mine of wealth to thousands of industrious and earnest farmers who have come hither from the East and by dint of hard work and enterprise have developed the resources which nature so liberally provided. Among these is John H. Anderson, who was born in North Carolina, in 1826, to the marriage of William and Jane (Scruggs) Anderson, natives of the Palmetto State, where they were reared and married. Later the parents moved to the Old North State and from there to Georgia, where they remained a few years. When our subject was five or six years of age the parents came by team to what is now Moniteau County, Missouri, when that was thinly settled, and in 1846 removed from there to Taney, now Stone County, and settled on Crane Creek. There they remained until the war, and in 1862 he removed with three of his sons to Texas. His death occurred at Ft. Griffin, Shackleford County, Tex., about 1883, when seventy-seven years of age. He followed farming through life and met with fair success. His father, Noble Anderson, was born in South Carolina, and his grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier. The mother of our subject died in the Lone Star State about 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson were the parents of nine children: John H., subject; Polly,...

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