Surname: Anderson

Sons of Quebec 1778-1843

The Sons of Quebec (Fils de Québec) were written by Pierre-Georges Roy and published in 1933 in a four volume set. They provide a series of short biographies of one to three pages of Quebec men from 1778-1843. Warning… this manuscript is in French!

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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War With The Modoc – Indian Wars

Early April 16th, the Modoc had a big fire in their camp. Major Thomas dropped a shell directly into it, provoking a frantic war whoop, and causing the sudden extinguishing of the fire. Another shell was dropped in the same locality, and was followed by yells of pain and dismay. The Modoc then appeared and challenged the soldiers to come out and fight. Another shell was the answer, and they were driven back. At 4 o’clock A. M. , after another fight, the Modoc gave up the attempt to break through the line and retired. Scattering shots were fired on the...

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Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County, Idaho continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence.

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Genealogy of Garriot K. Broyles

Broyles, Bruhls, Broils,Broiles originated from northwestern Germany. There are two towns one of which is Bruhl along the west side of the Rhine River. The largest community has an 18th century castle called Augustburg. The archbishop of Cologne had created the town in 1285. The family Brohl had lived in the area as early as the 14th century as in 1332 one Brohl had received a coat of arms. Some of the Broyles family came to America in 1717 to Culpepper, Virginia. The first was John Broyles who had several sons who were the ancestors for many of the Broyles today. The Broyles story here begins with the first one who came to Shelby County, Illinois. There has been much difficulty trying to pinpoint the ancestry of Garriot K. Broyles’ parents. His ancestry will be printed in a later volume. Garriot K. Broyles was born circa 1810 in Madison Coop Virginia. He had one known brother Ephraim and one sister Martha. In later years Garriot stated on his second marriage application that he was the son of Moses and Susannah Broyles, Garriot married Eunice V. Wayman on 22 December 1831 in Madison Co., Virginia. Eunice was the probable daughter of John Henry and Margaret Frances Wayman. Apparently the Broyles family lived near Harrisonburg, Virginia since one of their sons was born there. Sometime in 1858 the family moved to...

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Biographical Sketch of Presley Anderson

Presley Anderson and his wife, Elizabeth Steele, settled in Montgomery Co., Ky., in 1779. Their children were John A. S., James, William, Presley, Jr., Lucy, and Eliza. John A. S., better known as Captain Jack, was a remarkable man in his day, and is well remembered by the old citizens of Montgomery and Callaway counties. We give his history elsewhere. Presley, Jr., married Euphemia Jones, of Tennessee, and settled first in Warren Co., Mo., in 1814, from whence he removed to Montgomery County in 1817, and settled near Brush creek. He brought his family to Missouri on pack-horses, and they occupied Robert Ramsey’s house, near Marthasville, soon after the murder of the family of the latter. The blood was still upon the-floor when they went into the house, and Mrs. Anderson scoured it up before they put their furniture in. During the Indian war Mr. Anderson served as a ranger in Capt. Hargrove’s company, in Illinois. He was a devout Methodist, and the preachers of that denomination held services in his house for many years. The names of his children were Presley, Jr., Joseph, James, William, John, Margaret, Lucy, Elizabeth, and Eliza. James Anderson married Eliza Journey, of St. Charles County, and settled on Brush creek, in Montgomery County. He afterward removed to St. Louis County, where he died. Eliza Anderson married John Dabney, who settled near Middletown in...

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Slave Narrative of Sarah Wilson

Person Interviewed: Sarah Wilson Place of Birth: Summers County, Tennessee Date of Birth: 1851 Age: 86 I was born in 1851, makes me 86 years old. I was born in Middle Tennessee, Summers County. My mother was put on a block and sold from me when I was a child. I don’t remember my father real good. Sister Martha, Sister Sallie, nor Sister Jane wasn’t sold. But my brother John was. My mother’s name is Pachel Donnahue. We lived in a log hut. The white folks lived in a frame white building sitting in a big grove yard. Old master owned a big farm. We ate molasses, bread and butter and milk in wooden bowls and crumbled our bread up in it. Old master had big smokehouses of meat. Dey ate chickens, possums and coons, and my old auntie would barbecue rabbits for de white folks. We ate ash cakes too. I washed dishes, swept de yard, and kept de yard clean wid weed brush brooms. I never earned no money. All de slaves had gardens, and chickens too. My auntie, dey let her have chickens of her own and she raised chickens, and had a chicken house and garden down in de woods. I remember in time of de war dey’d send me down in de woods to pick up chips and git wood. All de men had...

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Slave Narrative of Robert Howard

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Robert Howard Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Clara County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1852 Place of Residence: 1840 Boulevard Place Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE ROBERT HOWARD-EX-SLAVE 1840 Boulevard Place Robert Howard, an ex-slave, was born in 1852, in Clara County, Kentucky. His master, Chelton Howard, was very kind to him. The mother, with her five children, lived on the Howard farm in peace and harmony. His father, Beverly Howard, was owned by Bill Anderson, who kept a saloon on the river front. Beverly was “hired out” in the house of Bill Anderson. He was allowed to go to the Howard farm every Saturday night to visit with his wife and children. This visit was always looked forward to with great joy, as they were devoted to the father. The Howard family was sold only once, being owned first by Dr. Page in Henry County, Kentucky. The family was not separated; the entire family was bought and kept together until slavery was abolished. Interviewer’s Comment Mr. Howard seems to be a very kind old man, lives in the house for aged colored people (The Alpha Home). He has no relatives, except a brother. He seems well satisfied living in the home. Submitted January 10, 1938 Indianapolis,...

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Biography of Rev. John A. Anderson

Rev. John A. Anderson, so long identified with the work of the Presbyterian Church at Junction City, and, while a resident of that place, with the affairs of Congress, of which he was a member, had a remarkable experience for a elergyman. He graduated from Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in 1853, Benjamin Harrison being his roommate for a time. Mr. Anderson began his ministerial work at Stockton, California, in 1857, and is said to have preached the first union sermon on the Pacific coast. In 1860 the state legislature of California elected him trustee of the state insane asylum. Two years later he was appointed chaplain of the Third California Infantry, and in that capacity he accompanied General Connor’s expedition to Salt Lake City. As correspondent and agent of the United States Sanitary Commission for California his first duty was to act as relief agent of the Twelfth army corps. He was next transferred to the central office at New York. In 1864, when General Grant began moving toward Richmond, Mr. Anderson was made superintendent of transportation and had charge of six steamboats. At the close of the campaign he served as assistant superintendent of the canvas and supply department at Philadelphia and edited a paper ealled the Sanitary Commission Bulletin. When the war closed he was transterred to the history burean of the commission at Washington, remaining there...

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Slave Narrative of John Anderson

Interviewer: Byers York Person Interviewed: John Anderson Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Clinton County PA A story resulting from an interview with John Anderson, an old Negro slave: “I was born in Pennsylvania, on Shiptown road, Clinton County, close to Mercersberg. When I was growing up my mammy always believed in making her own medicine, and doctored the whole family with the roots she dug herself. She use to bile down the roots from may-apple, snake root and blood root, and make her medicine. This was good for the blood and keep us from gettin’ sick. While the wah was goin’ on, the soldiers were campin’ all about us and when they heer’d the Gray’s was comin’ they got ready for battle, and when they did come they fit’ em back, and they made their stand at Harpers Ferry, Va., and had a hard battle there. My mammy was scared of the Gray’s and when she heer’d they was comin’, would hide us three boys in some white folks cellar until they was gone. They would take all the young niggahs with them they could get hold of, and soon as they’d gone, we would go back home. When the wah was over, me and some boys went over to the battlefield and foun’ a calvary gun which I had for years. We lived in a log cabin on...

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Slave Narrative of Charles H. Anderson

Interviewer: Ruth Thompson Person Interviewed: Charles H. Anderson Location: Cincinnati, Ohio Place of Birth: Richmond, Virginia Date of Birth: December 23, 1845 Place of Residence: 3122 Fredonia St., Cincinnati, Ohio Occupation: Handy man “Life experience excels all reading. Every place you go, you learn something from every class of people. Books are just for a memory, to keep history and the like, but I don’t have to go huntin’ in libraries, I got one in my own head, for you can’t forget what you learn from experience.” The old man speaking is a living example of his theory, and, judging from his bearing, his experience has given him a philosophical outlook which comprehends love, gentleness and wisdom. Charles H. Anderson, 3122 Fredonia Street, was born December 23, 1845, in Richmond, Virginia, as a slave belonging to J.L. Woodson, grocer, “an exceedingly good owner not cruel to anyone”. With his mother, father, and 15 brothers and sisters, he lived at the Woodson home in the city, some of the time in a cabin in the rear, but mostly in the “big house”. Favored of all the slaves, he was trusted to go to the cash drawer for spending money, and permitted to help himself to candy and all he wanted to eat. With the help of the mistress, his mother made all his clothes, and he was “about as well...

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Slave Narrative of Mary Anderson

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Mary Anderson Location: 17 Poole Road, R.F.D. #2, Raleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: Wake County NC Date of Birth: May 10, 1851 Age: 86 My name is Mary Anderson. I was born on a plantation near Franklinton, Wake County, N. C. May 10, 1851. I was a slave belonging to Sam Brodie, who owned the plantation at this place. My missus’ name was Evaline. My father was Alfred Brodie and my mother was Bertha Brodie. We had good food, plenty of warm homemade clothes and comfortable houses. The slave houses were called the quarters and the house where marster lived was called the great house. Our houses had two rooms each and marster’s house had twelve rooms. Both the slave and white folks buildings were located in a large grove one-mile square covered with oak and hickory nut trees. Marster’s house was exactly one mile from the main Louisburg Road and there was a wide avenue leading through the plantation and grove to marster’s house. The house fronted the avenue east and in going down the avenue from the main road you traveled directly west. The plantation was very large and there were about two hundred acres of cleared land that was farmed each year. A pond was located on the place and in winter ice was gathered there for summer use...

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Slave Narrative of Joseph Anderson

Interviewer: Mrs. Edith S. Hibbs Person Interviewed: Joseph Anderson Location: 1113 Rankin St., Wilmington, North Carolina Yes’m I was born a slave. I belong to Mr. T. C. McIlhenny who had a big rice plantation “Eagles Nest” in Brunswick County. It was a big place. He had lots of slaves, an’ he was a good man. My mother and father died when I was fourteen. Father died in February 1865 and my mother died of pneumonia in November 1865. My older sister took charge of me. Interviewer: “Can you read and write?” Joseph: “Oh yes, I can write a little. I can make my marks. I can write my name. No’m I can’t read. I never went to school a day in my life. I just “picked up” what I know.” I don’t remember much about slave times. I was fourteen when I was freed. After I was freed we lived between 8th and 9th on Chestnut. We rented a place from Dan O’Connor a real estate man and paid him $5 a month rent. I’ve been married twice. First time was married by Mr. Ed Taylor, magistrate in Southport, Brunswick County. I was married to my first wife twenty years and eight months. Then she died. I was married again when I was seventy-five years old. I was married to my second wife just a few years when...

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Biography of John A. Anderson

Farming operations have always claimed the attention of John A. Anderson and since starting out in life for himself he has operated land in Norway Township, now owning a fine place of one hundred and sixty acres on section 36. 1k was born in that Township on the 23rd of July, 1866, his parents being Alexander and Alice (Hamilton) Anderson, both natives of Scotland. The father was born September 3. 1823, and died on the 3rd of April, 1890, while the mother’s birth occurred in 1832 and she passed away January 4, 1876. They were married in Racine in 1863. It was in 1842 that Alexander Anderson accompanied his parents. Alexander and Rachel (Roberts) Anderson emigrated from Scotland to the new world, taking up their residence in Norway Township, Racine County. Here the grandfather of our subject secured a tract of government land, the patent being signed by President Tyler. This place consisted of a quarter section and was entirely unimproved when it came into his possession. Alexander Anderson, Jr., attended the public schools of Scotland until eleven years of age and received a good practical education which well fitted him for life’s responsible duties. He succeeded to the ownership of the old homestead in Norway Township and built thereon an elegant residence and good, substantial outbuildings. His home was upon what was originally the Chicago and Milwaukee dirt...

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