Surname: Allen

Postmasters and Postal Service in Norwich Vermont

It was fifteen years after the admission of Vermont into the Federal Union, and forty years after the settlement of the town, before Norwich had a post office. The first post office was established at Norwich Plain, July 1, 1805, and Jacob Burton was appointed postmaster. Postmaster Burton kept the office in his harness shop on the main street of the village, nearly opposite the present residence of Mrs. William E. Lewis. Probably the duties of the office were not so great as to interfere much with the prosecution of his trade. It is doubtful if Mr. Burton had...

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Church History of Norwich Vermont

The great achievement of the first generation of Norwich settlers was the building of a meeting house. More than any other event of the time, with the possible exception of the accomplishment of the national independence, this was an undertaking that enlisted the energies and taxed the resources of our forefathers. The building of a meeting house in a New England frontier settlement a century ago was regarded a matter of public concern, to be supported by the whole community without regard to sect or party, like the opening of roads or any other public charge. In less than ten years from the time the first clearing was made in Norwich, the preliminary steps were taken to provide a meeting house to be used for the accommodation of the whole people in the public worship of God. The question of the location of this building was sharply agitated, re-resulting in a keen competition between different sections of the town for the coveted distinction, inasmuch as the location of the house was supposed to fix the site of a possible future village where much of the business of the town would be transacted. When it became apparent that no agreement could be reached, a locating committee of three men from out of town was chosen and summoned upon the ground to decide where the meeting house should stand. The formal...

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History of the Baptist Church at Norwich Vermont

In Norwich, as elsewhere, the Baptists were the first of the dissenting sects to contest the ground with the dominant New England orthodoxy. Soon after the settlement of the town we find mention made of Baptists here, and it is probable that a few of the very earliest settlers were of that faith. The following documents are transcribed from the town records: Willington [Ct.] October ye 6, 1780. “This may Certify all Persons whom it may Concern that Calvin Johnsen of Wellington is of the Baptist Persuasion and is one of the society of the Baptist Church in said Willington and is ready to help to support the gospel in that order. “Andrew Main, Clerk” “Willington, September 24, 1784. This may certify that James Johnsen belonged to the Baptist society and his father and mother are Baptist. Signed in behalf of the Church, “Andrew Main, Church Clerk” The above certificates were doubtless procured and lodged in the town clerk’s office by the persons whose names they bear, with a view to exempt themselves from taxation for the support of the Rev. Mr. Potter, the settled minister of “the standing order” in the town at that time, as well as to relieve them from expenses for the building of the first meeting-house then in progress. A law of the state early made taxation for these purposes compulsory on all taxpayers...

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George...

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List of the Drummond Island Voyageurs

In 1828 the transfer of the British garrison from Drummond Island to Penetanguishene commenced. A list of voyageurs who resided on Drummond Island at the time of the transfer. In many cases a brief biographical sketch is contained which may provide clues to their ethnicity, family relationships, and the location where they or their ancestors settled.

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Washington County, Idaho Pioneer Honor Roll

In 1940 and 1943, a survey of everyone who had lived in Washington County, Idaho continuously for 50 years or more, was made by the Weiser American. These pioneer residents were especially honored at the Fall Festival held in the fall of both years. So far as is known, the list compiled by the survey is complete and perhaps the only record of its kind in existence.

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Early Residents of Helena, Montana

Isaac D. McCutcheon, born in New York in 1840, removed to Mich, with his parents in 1846, and was there educated. He began teaching school at the age of 18 years, and continued to teach for 5 years, after which he studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1868. He practised his profession in Charlotte, Michigan, until 1882, when he was appointed secretary of Montana. He resigned in 1883 to return to the practice of the law. F. S. Witherbee, born in Flint, Michigan, in 1860, removed to Louisville, in 1873. He was educated for a physician, graduating in Philadelphia 1883, but not liking his profession, he became a publisher in Washington D.C. He sold out his business in 1888, and came to Helena, where he engaged in real estate, organizing the Witherbee and Hunter Estate, Loan, Investment Co., Limited. O. K. Allen, born in the state of New York, in 1852, received a collegiate education, and in 1876 went to Colorado, where he remained until 1883, when he came to Montana and engaged in mining. In 1880 he acquired the Gould mine, and organized a stock company to develop the property. The mine has produced over $1,000,000, and is still producing richly. F. P. Sterling was born in Elkhorn, Wisconsin, in 1843, and was educated in his native town. In 1861 he entered the union army,...

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Treaty of October 11, 1842

1842, October 11. Treaty with the Confederated tribes of Sauk and Fox at the agency of the Sauk and Fox Indians in the Territory of Iowa. Schedule of debts annexed. Resolution of Senate, February 15, 1843. Ratification of President, March 23, 1843. The confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes cede to the U. S. all the lands W. of the Mississippi river to which they have any claim or title. The Indians reserve a right to occupy for three years from the signing of this treaty all that part of the land above ceded which lies W. of a line running due N. and S. from the painted or red rocks on the White Breast fork of the Des Moines river, which rocks will be found about 8 miles in a straight line from the junction of the White Breast with the Des Moines. Upon ratification of this treaty the U. S. agree to assign a tract of land suitable and convenient for Indian purposes to the Sacs and Foxes for a permanent home for them and their descendants, which tract shall be upon the Missouri river or some of its waters.

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1894 Michigan State Census – Dickinson County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Dickinson County. Breen Township. – William Allen, William H. Morris, George Fugal, Thomas Reiley. Breitung Township. – Philip Schell, James Durand, John L. Buell, Jerome Dakota, George P. Shaver. Felch Township. – Moses Brisk, Henry Duffy, Thomas Reiley, Thomas Quaid. Norway Township. – Robert Fisher, Michael Mullen. Sagola Township. – John Paranto, Richard Cleveland. Waucedah Township. – Salmon P. Saxton, Enos Renier, Henry G. Rothwell. Iron Mountain City, Second Ward. – W. T. Carpenter, Samuel Bassett. Iron Mountain City, Third Ward. – Patrick McCrystal. Iron Mountain City, Fourth Ward. – Joseph W. Burbank, Richard G. Thomas, William W. Felch, James Dewees, George H. Johnson, Edward S. Raymond, [Jos. French]. Iron Mountain City, Fifth Ward. – A. J. Hunting, W. E. Herrington, Robert P. Tuten, Peter Lavarer, Reuben A. Smith, Hiram H. Bradford, O. J. Derache, [William H. Sweet]. Norway City, First Ward. – James B. Lyon, Joseph Coutware, John H. Gauslin. Norway City, Second Ward. – James E. McDonald, John Gatherer, Thomas P....

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Biographical Sketch of George P. Allen

George P. Allen was born in Botetourt county, Virginia, July 30, 1821. His parents, William and Caroline Allen, were both natives of the same State. He received his education in the common schools of Virginia, and began the study of civil engineering. He learned the surveyor’s art, and has been engaged principally in that business through life. For the first few years after leaving school he was engaged in the mercantile business in his native State. In 1854 he removed to Missouri and settled in Daviess county, and from 1856 to 1861 held the responsible’ position of county surveyor. In that year of the beginning of the great civil strife, he went south as a volunteer, under Governor Claiborne Jackson, in the Confederate army. In December, 1861, he was taken prisoner by the Union forces in Jackson county, Missouri, and remained a prisoner of war until March, 1862. After his release he moved with his family to St. Joseph, Missouri, and there resided until the close of the war, when he returned to Daviess county. In 1872 he was again elected county surveyor, and has discharged the duties of said office with credit to himself and the county, ever since. Mr. Allen was married, on the 8th of May, 1847, to Miss Sarah A. Miller, a native of Augusta county, Virginia, born January 7, 1827. Four children were the...

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Biographical Sketch of Charles Allen

Charles Allen and his wife, Elizabeth Powell, settled in Kentucky in 1800, and came to Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1823. Their children were Joseph H., David P., Charles P., Polly E., Elizabeth B., Anna A., Martha C., Tabitha W., Lucy J., and Catharine C. Mr. Allen was a carpenter by trade, and built the jail at Lewiston. His son, Joseph H., who was a physician, died at Troy, in Lincoln County. David P. was married first to Ann Boone, by whom he had two children. After her death he married Nancy. Courtney, of St. Charles, and they had eight children. He died in 1874. Charles P. married Eliza J. Courtney, by whom he had thirteen children. Tabitha and Catharine died before they were grown. Polly and Elizabeth married brothers named Simpson. Anna married William Cowherd, and their children were Charles A., James D.., William R., Catharine C., Martha E., and Elizabeth P. Charles and William died before they were grown. James married Ella Logan, of Montgomery County. Martha married Joseph Crane, of Callaway County. Elizabeth married Charles Blades, of Montgomery...

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Biographical Sketch of John Randolph Allen

John Randolph Allen a pioneer of Tennessee was the father John Randolph Allen, born in 1836. Married in 1876, Nora Martin, born in 1858, they were natives of Tennessee. John Randolph and Nora (Martin) Allen were the parents of John Randolph Allen, born February 1877 in Chicago, Illinois. Married at Fort Smith, Arkansas December 25, 1916, Lulu, daughter of George and Mary Vaughn, born May 8, 1892 in Arkansas City, Kansas. Mr. Allen organized and directed the first elusively Indian agricultural and art fair among the Seminole and Creek Indians at Wetumka, Hughes...

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Biographical Sketch of James T. Allen, M. D.

James T. Allen was born in Botetourt, Botetourt county, Virginia, July 16, 1833. He lived with his parents until he was sixteen years old, then attended the Presbyterian High School for one year, and was a student one year at Princeton College, New Jersey. In 1851 he began reading medicine under Dr. Matthew Wallace, of Pocahontas County, Virginia, and continued under his preceptorship until 1853. During the winter of 1854 and 1855 he attended medical lectures at the Virginia Medical College, at Richmond. He came to Missouri in the spring of 1855 and settled at Auberry Grove, now Jamesport, and the following winter attended the McDowell Medical College, of St. Louis, graduating in the spring of 1856, when he returned to Auberry Grove and began the practice of medicine. In the spring of 1857 he, in conjunction with James Gillilan, laid out Jamesport, they giving the town that name after themselves, each bearing the name, James. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate army as a private in General Slack’s brigade, and served four years in the medical department on detail. After the war he returned home and soon after settled on a farm near Jamesport and pursued farming in connection with his practice until 1871, when he established himself in the drug business at Jamesport, still continuing the practice of medicine. He retired from the drug business in...

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Slave Narrative of Jim Threat

Person Interviewed: Jim Threat Place of Birth: Talidiga County, Alabama Date of Birth: September 1851 We all sung dat song and had a lot of fun singing it but it was true jest the same. Dat was one of the things dat the niggers dreaded most, was a patteroller. Slaves would have a little party all the niggers would gather at one of the cabins and lock the door so the patterollers couldn’t git in. When the party was over and they started home the patterollers would stop them and demand their passes. Woe to the nigger that didn’t have one! I guess they was all right in some cases but they over-done it I can tell you. I recollects that down in the neighborhood jest below us we was all the time hearing about the patterollers beating some nigger. Finally the slaves got tired of it and decided to do something about it. One night they got some grape vines and twisted them together and stretched them across the road. They went down the road and waited and finally four or five patterollers come along. The nigger boys started running back up the road and by this time the Patterollers was running their horses full speed after them. Just before they got to the vines the niggers ducked out of the road and the horses run full tilt...

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