Surname: Alderman

Alderman, Charlotte Ruth Odell – Obituary

Mrs. Charlotte Ruth Odell Alderman was born in Carroll County, Indiana, in 1842. Her father crossed the plains in 1851, bringing his wife and nine children. They settled in Webfoot near Dayton, where the family grew to maturity. Charlotte attended school at Lebanon, Lafayette and Willamette University, besides her home school. She taught school in Lincoln County, and in 1866, she married Albert Lockwood Alderman. They lived north of Dayton a number of years and then moved to Dayton so the children could better attend school. To them five children were born: Edwin who died in 1908; Ennis who lives near Dayton; Lewis who is a teacher in the state university; George who died in 1893; and Eva, now Mrs. Ora Powell of Corvallis. Mrs. Alderman was a most devoted wife and loving mother, a consistent Christian and a constituent member of the First Baptist Church of Dayton, Ore. She was strongly allied with the temperance work, being a member of the W. C. T. U. She was always sympathetic with those in need and had an abiding faith in the goodness of people. Her friends and relatives loved her in response to her strong affection on her part. She died at the home of her son Ennis May 30, 1910, being 68 years, 1 month and 14 days old. Rev. A. J. Hunsaker of McMinnville, who was her...

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Slave Narrative of Lizzie Baker

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Lizzie Baker Location: 424 Smith Street, Raleigh, North Carolina I was born de las’ year o’ de surrender an’course I don’t remember seein’ any Yankee soldiers, but I knows a plenty my mother and father tole me. I have neuritis, an’ have been unable to work any fer a year and fer seven years I couldn’t do much. My mother wus named Teeny McIntire and my father William McIntire. Mammy belonged to Bryant Newkirk in Duplin County. Pap belonged to someone else, I don’t know who. Dey said dey worked from light till dark, and pap said dey beat him so bad he run away a lot o’ times. Dey said de paterollers come to whare dey wus havin’ prayer meetin’ and beat ’em. Mammy said sometimes dey were fed well and others dey almost starved. Dey got biscuit once a week on Sunday. Dey said dey went to de white folks’s church. Dey said de preachers tole ’em dey had to obey dere missus and marster. My mammy said she didn’t go to no dances ’cause she wus crippled. Some o’ de help, a colored woman, stole something when she wus hongry. She put it off on mother and missus made mother wear trousers for a year to punish her. Mammy said dey gave de slaves on de plantation one day Christmas...

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Alderman, Albert Lockwood – Obituary

A. L. Alderman died at the home of his son near Dayton on Christmas Eve [December 24, 1908], aged 88 years. The funeral took place on Saturday, conducted by Rev. A. J. Hunsaker of this city an old-time friend and neighbor. Mr. Alderman was a Yamhill County pioneer of 1846. He was born at Old Bedford, Connecticut, December 16, 1820. The family home for most of his boyhood was near Warsaw, N.Y. He was 25 years old when he crossed the plains. His party came by way of Southern Oregon and lost their wagons in the Rogue River. Mr. Alderman took up a land claim near Dayton, and when the rush to California occurred in the summer of 1849 he went to the gold fields and stayed three months. He brought back some bags of gold dust with which he had a sawmill built on his place. Some of the oldest houses in Yamhill County were made from the lumber of this mill. In 1852 he was married to Mary Jane Burns of Polk County. She died in 1864, leaving four children. They are Mina (Mrs. F. K. Hubbard), William Alderman, Maritta, (Mrs. McCowan), all of whom live at Falls City, Polk County, and Medorum Alderman, now in California. In 1866 Mr. Alderman married Miss Charlotte Ruth Odell of Dayton. They had five children: Edwin, who died a year...

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Jacob Alderman

Corporal Medical Corps, Chief Surgeon Headquarters Div.; of Chowan County; son of J. O. and Mary Alderman. Entered service Aug. 12, 1918, at Norfolk, Va. Sent to Camp Lee, transferred to Camp Merritt, N. J. Sailed for France Sept. 13, 1918. Promoted to rank of Corporal February, 1918. Stationed at St. Nazairre, St. Aignan Thesee and at Surgeon Headquarters at Tours. Arrived in U. S. A. June 16, 1919, Hoboken. Mustered out at Camp Mitchell Field, June 25,...

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Biography of Albert L. Alderman

ALBERT L. ALDERMAN. – The pioneer experiences of Mr. Alderman are not exceeded in interest by those of any of the early settlers. Born at Old Bedford, Connecticut, and taken as a child to Wyoming county, New York, where he lived until twenty-one years of age, he set out at the age of twenty-four upon the career that did not end except upon the Pacific coast. He was at Bradford, Pennsylvania, for a time with an uncle, and in 1845 came out to Quincy, Illinois, and that same winter made up an outfit for coming to the mythical Oregon. At St. Louis, in March, he met a Mr. Good and Judge Quinn Thornton, who were also on the way to our state. At the rendezvous he found a large company assembling, aggregating five hundred wagons. An organization, the most complete that had ever been attempted, was here made. The wagons and outfits were inspected; and none unfit for the journey were allowed to proceed. A legal tribunal was established, having a judge and a jury, which was composed of six men. The military organization was also fully equal to the requirements. On the way to Fort Hall no more serious trouble was experienced than crossing swollen streams; and this was effected by using two large canoes lashed side by side into which the loaded wagons were run, with the...

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