Surname: Adair

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

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What Happened to the Sephardic Jewish Colonists?

There has never been a scientific study to determine the post-colonial history of the Sephardic communities in the Southern Piedmont and Appalachians. Anything that can be said must be in the realm of speculation, based on the known cultural history of the Southeast during the Colonial and Antebellum Eras. The only significant religious-based persecution in the Lower Southeast was between the Sephardic Jews and the Ashkenazi Jews from Eastern Europe. A Protestant minister in Savannah wrote, “Some Jews in Savannah complain that the Spanish and Portuguese Jews should persecute the German Jews in a way no Christian would persecute...

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1921 Farmers’ Directory of Greeley Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Adair, C. W. Wf. Bertha; ch. Florence, Maxine, Don. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 120 ac., sec. 24. (37.) Anderson, E. H. Wf. Christina; ch. Russell. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. R. 153.91 ac., sec. 5. (20.) Owner, J. F. Mortinson. Artist, Dan’l. Wf. Sarah; ch. Ada, Sadie, George, John, Elmer, Anna, Clara, Madge, Robert. P. O. Exira, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 2.5; O. 40 ac., sec. 36. Artist, John H. Wf. Mamie; ch. Homer, Hugh, Helen,...

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Choctaw Hunting Practices

Adair (p. 89) says; “the Choctaws, in an early day, practiced the custom of flattening the heads of their infants by compression, and were first known to the whites by the name of Flat Heads.” Be that as it may, the custom had long ceased to be practiced, when later known. Wherever they went, distant or otherwise, many or few, they always traveled in a straight line, one behind the other. (They needed no broad roads, nor had they any; hence, they dispensed with the necessity of that expense, road-working, so grudgingly bestowed by all white men. Paths alone, plain and straight, then led the Choctaws where now are broads roads and long high bridges, from village to neighborhood, and from neighborhood to village, though many miles apart; and so open and free of logs, bushes, and all fallen timber, was their country then, rendered thus by their annual burning off of the woods, it was an easy matter to travel in any direction and any distance, except through the vast cane-brakes that covered all the bottom lands, which alone could be passed by paths. On hunting excursions, when a party moved their camp to another point in the woods, whether far or near, they invariably left a broken bush with the top leaning in the direction they had gone, readily comprehended by the practiced eye of the Choctaw...

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Choctaw Culture

The Choctaws, like all of their race, had no written laws, and their government rested alone on custom and usage, growing out of their possessions and their wants; yet was conducted so harmoniously by the influence of their native genius and experience, that one would hardly believe that human society could be maintained with so little artifice. As they had no money, their traffic consisted alone in mutual exchange of all commodities; as there was no employment of others for hire, there were no contracts, hence judges and lawyers, sheriffs and jails were unknown among them. There were no beg...

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Gen. Anthony Wayne’s Campaign

In April 1792, General Anthony Wayne was appointed by the general government to take command of the Northwestern Army. On the 5th of the following November a hundred men from Kentucky, under Adair as captain, made a raid across the Ohio River into the Indians country, but the indefatigable Little Turtle and his band of heroes met him and, in a severe fight: defeated him, with heavy loss, and drove him back to his own. In the spring of 1793, during the arrangements that were being made for Wayne’s campaign, Congress sent commissioners to the Northwest Indians to negotiate...

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The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and...

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Massacre at Howard’s Well and Other Depredations – Indian Wars

Closely following the outbreak of the Cherokees and half -breed renegades at Whitemore‘s, Barren Fork, came on attack by a similar party of Indians, half breeds, and Mexicans combined, on a train of supplies, en route to Fort Stockton, at Howard’s Well, near old Fort Lancaster. The facts of this one of the most inhuman massacres in history were reported to the “War Department, by Col. Merritt, through General Angua, under date of April 29th, 1872. We give the report as written: On the 20th inst, I arrived with the cavalry of my command at Howard’s Well, a few hours too late to prevent one of the most horrible massacres that has ever been perpetrated on this frontier. A Mexican train, loaded with United States commissary and ordinance stores, on its way from San Antonio to Fort Stockton, was attacked by Indians, plundered and burned. All the people with the train, seventeen souls in all, were killed or wounded, except one woman. My command buried eleven bodies, and brought three wounded men and one woman into this post. Before arriving at the burning train, the first intimation we had of the horrible disaster were the charred and blackened corpses of some of the poor victims, but no one was alive to tell the horrors of the affair. I supposed, up to this time, that Capt. Sheridan, with the infantry of...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Luther H. Adair

(See Ghigau and Adair)-Lillie M. daughter of Allen and Lou (Fisher) Waldrop was born in Texas Friday Dec 8, 1865. Married Nov. 17, 1883 Luther Martin, son of Captain Ephriam Martin and Sallie (Starr) Adair, born in Flint District April 30, 1859. He died January 3, 1908. They were the parents of. Sarah Leola, born June 3, 1885; William Luther, born Feb. 16, 1887; Mary, born Aug. 5, 1889; Myrtle Lucinda, born December 11, 1891; Altie, born Nov. 4, 1894; Collie Bessie, born Jan. 1, 1897; Emmet Marshall born July 11, 1899; Nona Bertha, born Sept. 17, 1901; Arnie C., born Feb. 23, 1904 and Howard Ugean Adair, born Jan. 31, 1908. Sarah and Mary attended the Female Seminary. William L. was educated in Male Seminary and spent nine months in the service of the World War. Mrs. Adair is a member of the Church of...

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Biographical Sketch of Levi Adair

(See Grant and Adair) George M. Adair married Catherine Fields and their son Henry Ganoe Adair was born August 10. 1865. Married in May 1884 Caroline Bunch, born April 13, 1863. He elected sheriff of Illinois District August 5, 1895. He died. They were the parents of: Araminta, born May 10, 1885; George, born May 24, 1887; John Bell, born June 12, 1894; Catherine, born August 9, 1897; Levi, born June 9, 1900 and Zola B. Adair, born June 10, 1905. John Adair, a Scotchman married in 1789 Ga-ho-ka, a full blood Cherokee of the Deer Clan. Their son Samuel Adair married Mary Hughes. He was elected sheriff of Flint District in 1857 and 1859. Elected judge of the same District 1867, 1873, and 7. He died February 17, 1879. His wife had died in 1874. They were the parents; of George M. Adair who married Catherine...

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Biographical Sketch of Virgil H. Adair

(See Adair)-Virgil Harvey Adair, born April 15, 1869, married October 2, 1892, Dorinda, daughter of Jesse and Hariette Calloway, born April 9, 1874 in Missouri. They are the parents of: Viola, born June 15, 1893, married A. B. Jordan; Millard Herron, born July 16, 1898, married Minnie Thompson; Winnie, born December 23, 1900; Virgil, born March 27, 1903; Velma born November 15, 1904; Delphia, born February 28, 1907; Gladys, born December 23, 1909; Francis, born June 27, 1913 and Neva Marie, born July 31, 1915. Mr. Adair belongs to the Wolf Clan and is a Mason. He was elected a member of Council from Cooweescoowee District, August 3, 1903. Edward Alexander, son of John and Ann Berry (Graham) Adair was born August 25, 1847, was a member of Company C of Edmondson’s Georgia Battalion, Confederate service. Married in October 1867 Narcissa Malissa Harrison, born December 25, 1846 in Murray County Georgia. He died December 3, 1901. They were the parents of Virgil Harvey Adair, the subject of this...

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Biographical Sketch of Samuel Adair

(See Adair)-Samuel, the son of Rufus and Jennie (Fields) Adair, was born in the Cherokee Nation August 12, 1869; was educated at the Cherokee Orphan Asylum. He married March 6, 1892, Mary the daughter of Dick Welch, born May 30, 1877. They were the parents of Jennie, born November 28, 1892; Edna, born April 27, 1897; Levi, born December 15, 1898; Griffin born April 3rd, 1905; Sue, born December 8, 1900; and Benjamin Adair, born December 15, 1910. Their son Levi, enlisted and was on the firing line in France during the recent war. Mr. and Mrs. Adair are members of the Presbyterian Church. He was a deputy U. S. Marshal and special officer for the Frisco Railway...

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Biographical Sketch of A. Frank Adair

(See Grant)-Arthur Frank, son of John Lynch and Mary Jane (Jeffreys) Adair was born August 28, 1858, educated in Male Seminary. Married at Tahlequah September 1, 1886 Mollie Elizabeth Miller, born February 22, 1868. They were the parents of: Arthur Lynch, born May 11, 1891 and Owen Lewis Adair, born March 18, 1893. Rachel, daughter of Jeter and Nancy (Martin) Lynch married Thomas Benjamin Adair and they were the parents of John Lynch Adair who married Mary Jane Jeffreys a native of...

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Biography of T. J. Adair

Though not of the royal line, Harold, the son of the great Earl Godwin, had been elected and served for forty weeks as King of England, until on the fated fourteenth of October 1066 he was overthrown by the victorious legions of William, Duke of Normandy. Thenceforward known as William I, King of England and popularly called The Conqueror. The polish and elegance of the world at that time was best exemplified by the Norman Knights and Nobles, many of whom accompanied Arlotta’s son, settled in and directed the destinies of England. Among the proud cavaliers was d’Heanage. Hundreds of years later his more democratic descendants dismantled the orthography and pronunciation and called themselves Harnage; became roundheads, ironsides, nonconformists, Presbyterians and emigrated to America to swell the tide of hardy pioneers that was sweeping to and over the southern Appalachians, to make the world safer for civilization. They came, to another race of people, they saw a pride and energy equal to their own and many of them married among the Cherokees. Ambrose Harnage, one of these Englishmen, married in about 1810 Nancy Harlan nee Sanders, born in 1782, the daughter of Mitchell Sanders, an English trader from Virginia and his wife Susie, a full blood Cherokee of the Long Hair clan. Ambrose and Nancy Harnage’s children were: William, born June 5, 1811 and married Patsy Snow; George married...

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Biographical Sketch of Arthur Adair

(See Adair)—Arthur, son of William Penn and Julia (Allison) Adair born August 13, 1882, educated locally. Married July 23, 1905, lda, daughter W. C. and Nancy Jane Freeman, born in Missouri. They are the parents of: Selena Marie, born January 21, 1908; Beulah Belle, born September 12, 1909; Norman Lee, born June 29, 1914; Edith Mae, born September 15, 1917 and Wilma Adele born February 24,...

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