Collection: Indian Treaties Acts and Agreements

Treaty of June 13, 1802

This Indenture, made the thirtienth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and two, between the Sachems, Chiefs, and Warriors of the Seneca nation of Indians, of the first part, and Wilhem Willink, Pieter Van Eeghen, Hendrik Vollenhoven, W. Willink the younger, 1. Willink the younger (son of Jan) Jan Gabriel Van Staphorst, Roelof Van Staphorst, the younger, Cornelis Vollenhoven, and Hendrik Seye, all of the city of Amsterdam, and republic of Batavia, by Joseph Ellicott, esquire, their agent and attorney, of the second part. Whereas at a treaty held under the authority of the United States with the said Seneca nation of Indians, at Buffalo creek, in the county of Ontario, and state of New-York, on the day of the date of these presents, by the honorable John Taylor, esquire, a commissioner appointed by the President of the United States to hold the same, in pursuance of the constitution, and of the act of the Congress of the United States, in such case made and provided, a convention was entered into in the presence and with the approbation of the said commissioner, between the said Seneca nation of Indians and the said Wilhelm Willink, Pieter Van Eeghen, Hendrik Vollenhoven, W. Willink the younger, 1. Willink the younger (son of Jan) Jan Gabiel Van Staphorst, Roelof Van Staphorst the younger, Cornelis Vollenhoven, and...

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Treaty of October 11, 1842

1842, October 11. Treaty with the Confederated tribes of Sauk and Fox at the agency of the Sauk and Fox Indians in the Territory of Iowa. Schedule of debts annexed. Resolution of Senate, February 15, 1843. Ratification of President, March 23, 1843. The confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes cede to the U. S. all the lands W. of the Mississippi river to which they have any claim or title. The Indians reserve a right to occupy for three years from the signing of this treaty all that part of the land above ceded which lies W. of a line running due N. and S. from the painted or red rocks on the White Breast fork of the Des Moines river, which rocks will be found about 8 miles in a straight line from the junction of the White Breast with the Des Moines. Upon ratification of this treaty the U. S. agree to assign a tract of land suitable and convenient for Indian purposes to the Sacs and Foxes for a permanent home for them and their descendants, which tract shall be upon the Missouri river or some of its waters.

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Treaty of August 4, 1824

To perpetuate peace and friendship between the United States and the Sock and Fox tribes or nations of Indians, and to remove all future cause of dissensions which may arise from undefined territorial boundaries, the President of the United States of America, by William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, and sole Commissioner specially appointed for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs and Head Men of the Sock and Fox tribes or nations, fully deputized to act for and in behalf of their said nations, of the other part, have entered into the following articles and conditions, viz: Article I. The Sock and Fox tribes or nations of Indians, by their deputations in council assembled, do hereby agree, in consideration of certain sums of money, &c. to be paid to the said Sock and Fox tribes, by the Government of the United States, as hereinafter stipulated, to cede and for ever quit claim, and do, in behalf of their said tribes or nations, hereby cede, relinquish, and forever quit claim, unto the United States, all right, title, interest, and claim, to the lands which the said Sock and Fox tribes have, or claim, within the limits of the state of Missouri, which are situated, lying, and being, between the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, and a line running from the Missouri, at the entrance of Kansas river,...

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Treaty of September 3, 1822

Articles of a Treaty entered into and concluded at Fort Armstrong, by and between Thomas Forsyth, Agent of Indian Affairs, authorized on the part of the United States for that purpose, of the one part, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the United Sac and Fox Tribes, for themselves and their Tribes, of the other part. Whereas by the ninth article of the Treaty made and entered into between the United States and the Sac and Fox Tribes of Indians, concluded and signed at Saint Louis, in the District of Louisiana, on the third day of November, one thousand eight hundred and four, it is stipulated, in order to put a stop to the abuses and impositions which are practiced upon the said Tribes by the private traders, the United States will, at a convenient time, establish a trading house or factory, where the individuals of the said Tribes can be supplied with goods at a more reasonable rate than they have been accustomed to procure them. Now, We, the said Chiefs, Warriors, and head men of the said Tribes, for and in consideration of the sum of one thousand dollars to us, now paid in merchandise out of the United States’ Factory, by said Thomas Forsyth, on behalf of the United States, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, do exonerate, release, and forever discharge, the United...

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Treaty of May 13, 1816

A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at St. Louis between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said states, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors of the Sacs of Rock river and the adjacent country, of the other part. Whereas by the ninth article of the treaty of peace, which was concluded on the twenty-fourth day of December, eighteen hundred and fourteen, between the United States and Great Britain, at Ghent, and which was ratified by the president, with the advice and consent of the senate, on the seventeenth day of February, eighteen hundred and fifteen, it was stipulated that the said parties should severally put an end to all hostilities with the Indian tribes, with whom they might be at war, at the time of the ratification of said treaty; and to place the said tribes inhabiting their respective territories, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war. Provided, they should agree to desist from all hostilities against the said parties, their citizens or subjects respectively, upon the ratification of the said treaty being notified to them, and should so desist accordingly. And whereas the United States being determined to execute every article of the treaty with perfect good faith, and wishing to...

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Treaty of September 13, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of that portion of the Sac Nation of Indians now residing on the Missouri river, of the other part. Whereas the undersigned chiefs and warriors, as well as that portion of the nation which they represent, have at all times been desirous of fulfilling their treaty with the United States, with perfect good faith; and for that purpose found themselves compelled, since the commencement of the late war, to separate themselves from the rest of their nation, and remove to the Missouri river, where they have continued to give proofs of their friendship and fidelity; and whereas the United States, justly appreciating the conduct of said Indians, are disposed to do them the most ample justice that is practicable; the said parties have agreed to the following articles: Article 1. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and that portion of the Sacs which they represent, do hereby assent to the treaty between the United States of America and the united tribes of Sacs and Foxes, which was concluded at St. Louis, on the third day of November, one thousand eight hundred and four; and...

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Indian Treaties Tah-Wa-Carro to Ute

Treaties for all tribes listed below. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe. Tah-Wa-Carro, Tamarois, Tenino, Teton, Tonikawa, T’Peek-Sin, Tum-Waters, Tuscarora, Umatilla, Umpqua, Upper Pend D’Oreille, Utah, and Ute Tribes Tah-Wa-Carro (Towa-Karro, Ta-Wa-Ka-Ro) Treaty of May 15, 1846 Treaty of May 26, 1837 Tamarois Treaties Treaty of September 25, 1818 Tenino Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Teton Treaties (Teeton) Treaty of July 19, 1815 Treaty of June 22, 1825 Tonkawa Treaties (Tonkaway) Treaty of May 15, 1846 T’Peek-sin Treaties Treaty of December 26, 1854 Tum-Water Treaties Treaty of January 22, 1855 Tuscarora Treaties Treaty of October 22, 1784 Treaty of January 9, 1789 Agreement of April 24, 1792 Treaty of December 2, 1794 Treaty of January 5, 1838 Umatilla Treaties Treaty of June 9, 1855 Umpqua Treaties Treaty of September 19, 1853 Treaty of November 18, 1854 Treaty of November 29, 1854 Upper Pend D’Oreille Treaty of July 16, 1855 Treaty of October 17, 1855 Utah Treaties Treaty of December 30, 1849 Treaty of October 7, 1863 Ute Treaties Treaty of March 2,...

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Treaty of December 30, 1849

The following articles have been duly considered and solemnly adopted by the undersigned, that is to say, James S. Calhoun, Indian agent, residing at Santa Fé, acting as commissioner in the part of the United States of America, and Quixiachigiate, Nanito, Nincocunachi, Abaganixe, Ramahi, Subleta, Rupallachi, Saguasoxego, Paguisachi, Cobaxanor, Amuche, Puigniachi, Panachi, Sichuga, Uvicaxinape, Cuchuticay, Nachitope, Nachitope, Pueguate, Guano Juas, Pacachi, Saguanchi, Acaguate nochi, Puibuquiacte, Quixache tuate, Saxiabe, Pichiute, Nochichigue, Uvive, principal and subordinate chiefs, representing the Utah tribe of Indians. Article I. The Utah tribe of Indians do hereby acknowledge and declare they are lawfully and exclusively under the jurisdiction of the Government of said States: and to its power and authority they now unconditionally submit. Article II. From and after the signing of this treaty, hostilities between the contracting parties shall cease, and perpetual peace and amity shall exist, the said tribe hereby binding themselves most solemnly never to associate with, or give countenance or aid to, any tribe or band of Indians, or other persons or powers, who may be, at any time, at enmity with the people or Government of said States; and that, they will, in all future time, treat honestly and humanely every citizen of the United States, and all persons and powers at peace with the said States, and all cases of aggression against the said Utahs shall be referred to the...

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Treaty of June 22, 1825

Treaty with the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands of the Sioux tribe of Indians. For the purposes of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands of the Sioux tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, of the United States’ army, and Major Benjamin O’Fallon, Indian Agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, head men and Warriors of the Teton, Yancton, and Yanctonies bands of the Sioux tribe of Indians, on behalf of said bands or tribe of the other part, have made and entered into the following Articles and Conditions; which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate; shall be binding on both parties—to wit: Article I. It is admitted by the Teton, Yancton and Yanctonies bands of Sioux Indians, that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection. The said bands also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them. Article II. The United States agree to...

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Treaty of July 19, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at Portage des Sioux, between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Teton Tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said Tribe, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury, or act of hostility, committed by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the said Teeton tribe; and the friendly relations that existed between them before the war, shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Article III. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves and their aforesaid tribe to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other...

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Wyandot and Shawnee Indian Lands

A Schedule embracing the names of Wyandot Indians of the Incompetent Class and Orphan Class under the Wyandot Treaty of January 31, 1855, the sales of whose lands, assigned and patented to them under said Treaty, have been confirmed by the Secretary of the Interior, upon a full examination of the report of Commissioners, Irwin and Cobb dated October 3rd 1870 and hearing of the parties interested in accordance with the 15th article of the treaty of February 23rd 1867, with certain Wyandot and other Indians in Kansas.

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Indian Treaties Waco to Yakima

Treaties for all tribes listed below. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe Waco, Walla Walla, Wasco, Wea, Winnebago, Witchetaw, Wyandot and Yakima Tribes Waco Treaties (Wacoe) Treaty of May 15, 1846 Walla-Walla Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of June 9, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Wasco Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Wea Treaties Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 21, 1805 Treaty of September 30, 1809 Treaty of October 26, 1809 Treaty of June 4, 1816 Treaty of October 2, 1818 Treaty of August 11, 1820 Treaty of October 29, 1832 Treaty of May 30, 1854 Treaty of February 23, 1867 Winnebago Treaties Treaty of June 3, 1816 Treaty of August 19, 1825 Treaty of August 11, 1827 Treaty of August 25, 1828 Treaty of August 1, 1829 Treaty of September 15, 1832 Treaty of November 1, 1837 Treaty of October 13, 1846 Treaty of February 27, 1855 Treaty of April 15, 1859 Treaty of March 8, 1865 Witchetaw Treaties (Wichita, Wicheta, Ouichita) Treaty of August 24, 1835 Treaty of May 15, 1846 Wyandot Treaties (Wyandotte, Wiandot) Treaty of January 21, 1785 Treaty of January 9, 1789 Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of August 7, 1803 Treaty of July 4, 1805 Treaty of November 17, 1807 Treaty of November...

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Treaty of April 1, 1850

Articles of a convention concluded in the city of Washington, this first day of April, on thousand eight hundred and fifty, by and between Ardavan S. Loughery, commissioner especially appointed by the President of the United States, and the undersigned head chief and deputies of the Wyandot tribe of Indians, duly authorized and empowered to act for their tribe. Whereas, By the treaty of March 17, 1842, between the United States and the Wyandot nation of Indians, then chiefly residing within the limits of the State of Ohio, the said nation of Indians agreed to sell and transfer, and did thereby sell and transfer, to the United States their reservations of land, one hundred and nine thousand acres of which was in the State of Ohio, and Six thousand acres were in the State of Michigan, and to remove to the west of the Mississippi River: And whereas, among other stipulations it was agreed that the United States should convey to said Indians a tract of country for their permanent settlement in the Indian territory west of the Mississippi River, to contain one hundred an [and] forty-eight thousand acres of land: And whereas, The said Indians never did receive the said one hundred and forty-eight thousand acres of land from the United States, but were forced to purchase lands from the Delaware nation of Indians, which purchase was agreed...

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Treaty of March 17, 1842

John Tyler, President of the United States of America, by John Johnston, formerly agent for Indian affairs, now a citizen of the State of Ohio, commissioner duly authorized and appointed to treat with the Wyandott Nation of Indians for a cession of all their lands lying and being in the States of Ohio and Michigan; and the duly constituted chiefs, counselors, and head-men, of the said Wyandott Nation, in full council assembled, on the other part, have entered into the following articles and conditions, viz: Article I. The Wyandott Nation of Indians do hereby cede to the United States all that tract of land situate, lying, and being in the county of Crawford and State of Ohio, commonly known as the residue of the large reserve, being all of their remaining lands within the State of Ohio, and containing one hundred and nine thousand one hundred and forty-four acres, more or less. The said nation also hereby cedes to the United States all their right and title to the Wyandotte Reserve, on both sides of the river Huron, in the State of Michigan, containing four thousand nine hundred and ninety-six acres, be the same more or less, being all the remaining lands claimed or set apart for the use of the Wyandotts within the State of Michigan; and the United States hereby promises to pay the sum of five...

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Treaty of April 23, 1836

Articles of a treaty made and concluded between John A. Bryan, commissioner on the part of the United States, and William Walker, John Barnett, and Peacock, chiefs and principal men of the Wyandot tribe of Indians in Ohio, acting for and on behalf of the said tribe. Article I. The Wyandot tribe of Indians in Ohio cede to the United States a strip of land five miles in extent, on the east end of their reservation in Crawford county in said State-also, one section of land lying in Cranberry Swamp, on Broken Sword Creek, being the one mile square specified and set forth in the treaty made with the said tribe on the twenty-ninth day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventeen-also, one hundred and sixty acres of land, which is to be received in the place and stead of an equal quantity set apart in a supplemental treaty made with the said Indians on the seventeenth day of September in the following year, all situate and being in the said county of Crawford. Article II. The said five mile tract, as also the additional quantities herein set forth, are each to be surveyed as other public lands are surveyed by the Surveyor General, and to be sold at such time and place, allowing sixty days’ notice of the sale, as the...

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