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Collection: Indian Treaties Acts and Agreements

Treaty of September 30, 1825

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now For the purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Pawnee tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier General Henry Atkinson, of the United States’ army, and Major Benjamin O’Fallon, Indian Agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, head men and Warriors of said Pawnee tribe of Indians, on behalf of their tribe of the other part, have made and entered into the following Articles and Conditions; which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding on both parties—to wit: Article I. It is admitted by the Pawnee tribe of Indians, that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection.—The said tribe also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them. Article II. The United States agree to receive the Pawnee tribe of Indians into their friendship, and under their protection, and to extend to them, from time to...

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Treaty of June 22, 1818

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Pawnee Marhar tribe, on the part and behalf of their said tribe, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties, against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Pawnee tribe. Article III. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever. Article IV. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and the tribe they represent, do moreover promise and oblige themselves to deliver up, or to cause to be delivered up, to the authority of the United States, (to be punished according to...

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Treaty of June 20, 1818

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Pawnee Republic, on the part and behalf of their tribe, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties, against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Pawnee tribe. Article III. The undersigned, chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever. Article IV. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and the tribe they represent, do moreover promise and oblige themselves to deliver up, or to cause to be delivered up, to the authority of the United States, (to be punished according to law,) each...

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Treaty of June 19, 1818

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Pitavirate Noisy Pawnee tribe, on the part and behalf of their said tribe, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties, against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Noisy Pawnee tribe. Article III. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever. Article IV. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and the tribe they represent, do moreover promise and oblige themselves to deliver up, or cause to be delivered up, to the authority of the United States, (to be punished according...

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Treaty of June 18, 1818

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded, by and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors of the Grand Pawnee tribe, on the part and behalf of their said tribe, of the other part. The parties, being desirous of establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury, or act of hostility, by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Grand Pawnee tribe. Article III. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever. Article IV. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and the tribe they represent, do moreover promise and oblige themselves to deliver up, or cause to be delivered up, to the authority of the United States, (to be punished according to...

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Treaty of November 15, 1824

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty between the United States of America and the Quapaw Nation of Indians. Article I. The Quapaw Nation of Indians cede to the United States of America, in consideration of the promises and stipulations hereinafter made, all claim or title which they may have to lands in the Territory of Arkansas, comprised in the following boundaries, to wit: Beginning at a point on the Arkansas river, opposite to the Post of Arkansas, and running thence a due south-west course to the Ouachita river; and thence, up the same, to the Saline Fork; and up the Saline Fork, to a point from whence a due north-east course will strike the Arkansas river at Little Rock: and thence down the right (or south bank) of the Arkansas river to the place of beginning. Article II. In consideration of the cession made in the first article of this Treaty, by the aforesaid Chiefs and Warriors, the United States engage to pay to the four head Chiefs of the Quapaw Nation, the sum of five hundred dollars each, in consideration of the losses they will sustain by removing from their farms and improvements. The payment to be made at the time they receive their annuity for the year 1825. And, also, to the said nation, the sum...

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Treaty of August 24, 1818

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of friendship, cession, and limits, made and entered into, this twenty-fourth day of August, eighteen hundred and eighteen, by, and between, William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners on the part and behalf of the United States, of the one part, and the undersigned, chiefs and warriors of the Quapaw tribe or nation, on the part and behalf of their said tribe or nation, of the other part. Article I. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe or nation, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States, and of no other state, power, or sovereignty, whatsoever. Article II. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe or nation, do hereby, for, and in consideration of, the promises and stipulations hereinafter named, cede and relinquish to the United States, forever, all the lands within the following boundaries, viz: Beginning at the mouth of the Arkansaw river; thence extending up the Arkansaw, to the Canadian fork, and up the Canadian fork to its source; thence south, to Big Red river, and down the middle of that river, to the Big Raft; thence, a direct line, so as to strike the Mississippi river, thirty leagues in a straight line, below the mouth of Arkansaw; together with...

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Treaty of July 18, 1825

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now To put an end to an unprovoked hostility on the part of the Ricara Tribe of Indians against the United States, and to restore harmony between the parties, the President of the United States, by Brigadier-general Henry Atkinson, of the United States’ Army, and Major Benjamin O’Fallon, Indian Agent, Commissioners duly appointed and commissioned to treat with the Indian tribes beyond the Mississippi river, give peace to the said Ricara Tribe; the Chiefs and Warriors thereof having first made suitable concessions for the offence. And, for the purpose of removing all further or future cause of misunderstanding as respects trade and friendly intercourse between the parties, the above named Commissioners on the part of the United States, and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Ricara Tribe of Indians on the part of said Tribe, have made and entered into the following articles and conditions, which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding on both parties, to wit: Article I. Henceforth there shall be a firm and lasting peace between the United States and the Ricara tribe of Indians; and a friendly intercourse shall immediately take place between the parties. Article II. It is admitted by the Ricara tribe of Indians,...

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Indian Treaties Sac to Swinamish

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaties for the Sac & Fox, Sa-Heh-Wamish, Sah-Ku-Meh-Hu, Scotons, Seminole, Seneca, Shawnee, S’homamish, Shoshoni, Shoshoni-Goship, Siouan/Sioux, Six Nations, Skai-Wha-Mish, Skagit, S’klallam, Sk-Tah-Le-Jum, Snake, Shohomish, Snoqualmoo, Squawskin, Squi-Aitl, Squin-Ah-Nush, St. Regis, Stehchass, Steilacoom, Stockbridge, Suquamish, and Swinomish Tribes. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe Sac and Fox (Sack, Sauk, Sock) Treaty of January 9, 1789 Treaty of November 3, 1804 Treaty of September 13, 1815 Treaty of May 13, 1816 Treaty of September 3, 1822 Treaty of August 4, 1824 Treaty of August 19, 1825 Treaty of July 15, 1830 Treaty of September 21, 1832 Treaty of September 27, 1836 Treaty of September 28, 1836 Treaty of September 28, 1836 – 2 Treaty of September 17, 1836 Treaty of October 21, 1837 Treaty of October 21, 1837 – 2 Treaty of October 11, 1842 Treaty of May 18, 1854 Treaty of October 1, 1859 Treaty of March 6, 1861 Treaty of February 18, 1867 Sa-Heh-Wamish Treaty of December 26, 1854 Sah-Ku-Meh-Hu Treaty of January 22, 1855 Scotons Treaty of November 18, 1854 Seminole Treaties Treaty of September 18, 1823 Treaty of May 9, 1832 Treaty of March 28, 1833 Treaty of January 4, 1845 Treaty of August 7, 1856 Agreement of September 13, 1865 Treaty of March 21, 1866 Seneca Treaties (Seneka) Treaty of...

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Treaty of September 3, 1839

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made at Stockbridge in the Territory of Wisconsin, on the third day of September in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine, between the United States of America, by their commissioner Albert Gallup, and the Stockbridge and Munsee tribes of Indians, who reside upon Lake Winnebago in the territory of Wisconsin. Article I. The Stockbridge and Munsee tribes of Indians (formerly of New York) hereby cede and relinquish to the United States, the east half of the tract of forty-six thousand and eighty acres of land, which was laid off for their use, on the east side of Lake Winnebago, in pursuance of the treaty made by George B. Porter commissioner on the part of the United States, and the Menominee nation of Indians, on the twenty-seventh day of October eighteen hundred and thirty-two. The said east half hereby ceded, to contain twenty-three thousand and forty acres of land; to be of equal width at the north and south ends, and to be divided from the west half of said tract of forty-six thousand and eighty acres, by a line to be run parallel to the east line of said tract. The United States to pay therefore, one dollar per acre at the time and in the manner...

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Treaty of July 16, 1825

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now For the purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Hunkpapas band of the Sioux tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, of the United States Army, and Major Benjamin O’Fallon, Indian agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Headmen, and Warriors of the said Hunkpapas band of Sioux Indians, on behalf of their band, of the other part, have made and entered into the following Articles and Conditions; which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding on both parties, to wit: Article I. It is admitted by the Hunkpapas band of Sioux Indians that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection. The said band also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them. Article II. The United States agree to receive the Hunkpapas band of Sioux into their friendship, and under their protection, and...

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Treaty of July 5, 1825

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now For the purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Sioune and Ogallala bands of the Sioux tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, of the United States’ Army, and Major Benjamin O’Fallon, Indian Agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Head-men, and Warriors, of the said Sioune and Ogallala bands of Sioux Indians, on behalf of their bands, of the other part, have made and entered into the following articles and conditions, which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate shall be binding on both parties,—to wit: Article I. It is admitted by the Sioune and Ogallala bands of Sioux Indians, that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection. The said bands also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them. Article II. The United States agree to receive the Sioune and Ogallala bands of Sioux into...

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Treaty of June 1, 1816

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at St. Louis, between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said states, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors, representing eight bands of the Siouxs, composing the three tribes called the Siouxs of the Leaf, the Siouxs of the Broad Leaf, and the Siouxs who shoot in the Pine Tops, on the part and behalf of their said tribes, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribes, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility, committed by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States, and all the individuals composing the aforesaid tribes; and all the friendly relations that existed between them before the war shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Article...

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Treaty of November 7, 1825

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a convention made between William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, and the undersigned Chiefs and Head Men of the Shawonee Nation of Indians, residing within the State of Missouri, duly authorized and empowered by said Nation, at the City of St. Louis, on the seventh day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five. Whereas the Shawnee Indians were in possession of a tract of land near Cape Geredeau, in the State of Missouri, settled under a permission from the Spanish Government, given to the said Shawnees and Delawares by the Baron De Carondelet, on the fourth day of January, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-three, and recorded in the office of Recorder of Land Titles at St. Louis, containing about (25) twenty-five miles square, which said tract of land was abandoned by the Delawares, in the year 1815: and from which the said Shawnees, under an assurance of receiving other lands in exchange, did remove, after having made valuable and lasting improvements on the same, which were taken possession of by the citizens of the United States: And it being the desire of the United States fully to indemnify said tribe for all losses and injuries sustained by them by reason of such removal—the following articles have...

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Treaty of May 20, 1842

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Buffalo Creek, in the State of New York, on the twentieth day of May in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, between the United States of America, acting herein by Ambrose Spencer their Commissioner, thereto duly authorized, on the one part, and the chiefs, headmen and warriors of the Seneca nation of Indians, duly assembled in council, on the other part. Whereas a treaty was heretofore concluded, and made between the said United States, and the chiefs, headmen, and warriors of the several tribes of New York Indians, dated the fifteenth day of January in the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-eight (Treaty of January 15, 1838), which treaty having been afterwards amended, was proclaimed by the President of the United States, on the fourth of April one thousand eight hundred and forty, to have been duly ratified. And whereas on the day of making this treaty, and bearing even date herewith, a certain indenture was made executed and concluded by and between the said Seneca nation of Indians and Thomas L. Ogden, and Joseph Fellows, assignees under the State of Massachusetts, in the presence, and with the approbation of a Commissioner appointed by the United States, and in the presence and with the approbation...

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