Collection: A Standard History of Kansas and Kansans

Biography of William Patrick Hackney

William Patrick Hackney was born in Iowa, in 1842; migrated with his father to Illinois in 1850. Entered the United States Army in 1861 as a private and mustered out as captain of his company four years after. Was in many battles; and wounded twice. Came to Kansas in 1870; was a member of the lower house of Legislature in 1872 and 1874, from Sumner County; and from Cowley County in 1876 and 1905; was in the upper house from 1881 to 1885. Owes no man a cent, nor a grudge. Wishes all men well, and enjoys every one of his waking hours. The foregoing is all that Mr. Hackney desired in this work. His position in Kansas, however, nas been one of prominence, and it is believed that there shotdd be some additional material concerning Mr. Hackney’s life in Kansas. He has taken a large part in public affairs and in favor of the best interests of the state. He was the first man to publiely announce himself in favor of the election of Preston B. Plumb as United States senator. He was frequently a member and sometimes chairman of the state conventions of the republican party, and his services were in demand in the party councils and the campaigns. As a lawyer Mr. Hackney has always occupied a prominent place in the Kansas bar. Mr. Hackney wrote...

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Biography of Rev. Cyrus R. Rice

Rev. Cyrus R. Rice, of Hartford, is one of the revered fathers of the Methodist Church in Kansas. He comes of a Tennessee family, and was himself born near Lebanon, that state, August 27, 1833. His father was a physician of many years’ practice in Tennessee and Missouri. The son also studied medicine, but his decided inclinations were toward the ministry, and in 1853 he united with the St. Louis Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The next year he was licensed to preach and appointed to the Thomasville Circuit, and in 1855 was sent as a missionary to Osawatomie, Kansas. In March, 1856, he returned to Patterson, Missouri, married Lucy A. McCormick, and spent most of his bridal trip on horseback with his wife, returning to Kansas. During the succeeding three years he organized various societies along the Neoshe River, at Fort Scott and Tecumseh, and in 1859 was assigned to the Shawneetown charge, where he ministered for two years. During the Civil war the Methodist Church, South, withdrew from Kansas and Mr. Rice was without regular appointment until March, 1865, when he united with the conference of the Methodist Episeopal Church and was assigned to the congregations at Centropolis and Prairie City. In 1867 he moved to Lyon County, and was the first presiding elder of the district. After four years of service in that capacity...

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Biographical Sketch of Rev. Thomas Johnson

Rev. Thomas Johnson, for twenty-six years a missionary among the Shawnee and other Indian tribes of Kansas and one of the prominent characters in American Methodism of his day, was born in Virginia, July 11, 1802. When comparatively young he came to Missouri and in 1826 entered the Methodist ministry. His first charge was at Mount Prairie, Arkansas, and in 1828, having been received into full connection, he was appointed to Fishing River. In 1830 he was appointed to the Shawnee mission, which was in the Missouri district, and served as its super-intendent until 1841, when he resigned on account of failing health. Having regained his health by medical treatment and a period of relaxation, in the fall of 1847 he was reappointed to the manual-labor school, serving thus until the establishment was discontinued in 1862. Mr. Johnson had already made quite a name in the politics of the day. As early as 1853 he had been elected, by Indian votes, as a delegate to Congress of the territorial government projected for Kansas and Nebraska, but as it was never organized he was, of course, not received, although he went to Washington for the purpose. In March, 1855, he had been elected to the Kansas Territorial Council on the pro-slavery ticket, and his son, twenty-three years of age, was returned to the lower house as its youngest member. Although...

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Biography of Samuel Walker

Samuel Walker, for nearly forty years one of the most stirring figures in the military and civil commotions which centered in the Lawrence region, was a Pennsylvanian, born in Franklin County, October 19, 1822. In 1848 he moved to Ohio and followed his trade as a cabinet maker, and in April, 1855, settled permanently in Kansas. He came with a large party of emigrants and located near Lawrence, with other pronounced free-soil settlers. About six weeks later he was urged by the sheriff of Douglas County to leave the country, but his answer was made the next day, in the organization of a company of eighty-six free-soilers under the name of the Bloomington Guards. Mr. Walker was first sergeant of the body. In the following year he was elected colonel of the Fourth Kansas Cavalry, which participated in all the campaigus of the free-state men. In that capacity he was at the sieges of Lawrence and Fort Saunders and in command at the capture of Fort Titus. In 1856 Mr. Walker served as a member of the Territorial House of Representatives under the Topeka constitution, and it was he who, in February, 1858, found the returns of the election under the Lccompton constitution hidden in a candle box near the office of Surveyor General Calhoun at Lecompton. From June, 1861, until May, 1862, he served in the Civil war...

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Biography of William Henry Redeneraugh

Now conducting one of the best equipped and most orderly dairy farms in Shawnee County, W. H. Redenbeaugh was for many years an active railroad man, chiefly with the Santa Fe Company, and deserves mention as one of the early settlers of Shawnee County, where he had resided for forty-five years. His birth occurred in Boone County, Indiana, March 2, 1865. His father, James F. Redenbaugh, was born in Montgomery County, Indiana, in 1847. The grandfather, Fred Redenbeaugh, was also a native of Indiana, where the family settled when Indiana was a territory. George Redenbeaugh served as a soldier in the War of 1812. James F. Redenbeaugh was reared in Boone County, Indiana, followed his trade as carpenter there, but in 1871 set out for Kansas, bringing his family to Topeka and entering the service of the Santa Fe Railway Company as a carpenter. He continued as a railroad carpenter for twenty years, and on leaving the Santa Fe took up stone contracting, which he followed until his death. While not a church man, James F. Redenbeaugh had excellent moral character, was respected by all who knew him, and was a man of very tender heart and most gentle in the government of his family, for whom he provided well. He and his wife Rebecca Ann had seven children. Their names were Minerva; Catherine; William Henry; Amanda; David, deceased;...

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Biography of George Octavius Boone

George Octavius Boone had been a resident of Kansas since 1881. In that year he embarked on a career as a commercial traveler, and had been a traveling man now for more than thirty-five years. For several years he represented a Boston shoe firm with headquarters in St. Louis, Baxter Springs, Arkansas City and Longmont, Colorado. Since 1897 his home had been in Topeka, and with the exception of three years he had been connected with the Topeka Daily Capital. The Boone family from whom he is descended had an authentic record of ancestors as far back as 1516. Originally they were of French extraction, the original name being DeBun. Count DeBun in 1516 was exiled from France and settled on the coast of Wales, and his descendants of later generations came to America. Soon after his exile the name came to be spelled Boone, and the distinguished soldier and explorer Daniel Boone was of the same family as my great-grandfather, his ancestors having been born in Southern England. Correction: Octavius Cunningham Boone is not related to Daniel Boone. – David Botts George Octavius Boone was born at Louisville, Kentucky, December 25, Christmas Day, 1861. His grandfather John William Boone was born in 1768, and died in 1867 at the remarkably advanced age of ninety-nine years. He was a veteran of the War of 1812, and the old flintlock...

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Biography of John Baptist Miege

John Baptist Miege, first Catholic bishop of Kansas, was born in 1815, the youngest son of a wealthy and pions family of the parish of Chevron, Upper Savoy, France. At an early age he was committed to the care of his brother, the director of the episcopal seminary of Moutiers, and completed his literary studies at the age of nineteen. After spending two more years at the seminary in the study of philosophy, on October 23, 1836, he was admitted to the Society of Jesns. The following eleven years he spent in further study, a portion of the time at Rome under eminent masters. In 1847 he was ordained priest and completed his theological training in the following year. In the midsummer of 1849 Father Miege set sall for the Indian mission of North America, and reaching St. Louis in the fall was appointed pastor of the little church at St. Charles, Missouri, which included the mission of the Portage. Later he was removed to the house of probation at Florissant, Missouri, where he taught moral philosophy, and in 1851 was sent to St. Louis University. In the fall of that year he was appointed to the vicariate apostolic of all the territory from the Kansas River at its mouth north to the British possessions, and from the Missouri River west to the Rocky Mountains, being consecrated to that...

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Biography of Edward Shellenbaum

Edward Shellenbaum is co-editor and owner with D. E. Deputy of the Manhattan Nationalist. He entered the newspaper field a few years ago after long and competent service as postmaster at Randolph in Riley County. A native Kansan, he was born in Riley County on his father’s farm near Randolph, November 25, 1875, a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Siebecker) Shellenbaum. Mention of the name of the late Henry Shellenbaum serves to recall not only one of the most prominent pioneers of Riley County, but also some incidents of pioneer life that fittingly find a place in the history of Kansas. The Shellenbaums and their connections were among the first to occupy and develop that beantiful tract of Kansas landscape known as the Fancy Creek Valley. The Shellenbaums are of Swiss stock. Henry was born at Zurich, Canton Winterthur, Switzerland, October 1, 1833. At the age of twenty-one he came to the United States with his parents and brothers and sisters. His father died on the voyage and was buried at sea. The widowed mother and her children located at Seymour, Indiana. About two years later, in 1856, Henry Shellenbaum, with two other natives of Switzerland, Edward and Solomon Secrest, journeyed from Jackson County, Indiana, to Kansas. Kansas was still a territory and a hot bed of the critical troubles growing out of the free-state movement. In November of...

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Biography of Hon. Charles P. Hangen

Hon. Charles P. Hangen, who has recently finished his second term as member of the State Legislature, is one of the prominent bankers of Sumner County, being cashier of the National Bank of Commerce at Wellington. He was born in Darke County, Ohio, November 9, 1877, but has lived in Kansas since 1882. In that year his parents, Christian and Sarah Hangen, came to Kansas and located six miles southwest of Wellington on the farm still owned by Mrs. Hangen. Christian Hangen was a native of Germany and his wife of Ohio. He was successfully identified with general farming and stock raising in Sumner County until his death in 1903 at the age of fifty-five. In the meantime he had acquired a fine place of three quarter sections of land. His widow now resides in Wellington. Charles P. Hangen in addition to the local schools attended the business college at Fort Scott, and has lived in Wellington since he was twenty-one years of age. In 1906 upon the organization of the National Bank of Commerce he was elected cashier, and his financial ability and his personal popularity have been important factors in the success and growth of that institution to one of the strongest banks in that part of Kansas. Mr. Hangen is an active democrat. He was first elected a member of the House of Representatives from the...

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Biography of Capt. William E. Payton

Capt. William E. Payton, editor and owner of the Colony Free Press, had been a live factor in Kansas journalism for a number of years. He is also prominent in Kansas military circles, having seen service in actual warfare during the Philippine insurrection, and is now captain of Machine Gun Company of the Third Kansas Infantry. Captain Payton is a native of Kansas, having been born on a farm in Butler County December 15, 1879. His parents were Benjamin F. and Sarah C. Payton, both natives of Indiana. His father served as a soldier in the Civil war. The family came to Kansas in the early ’70s and his father died in 1915. They were the parents of nine children, eight sons and one daughter, William E. being the seventh in age. Captain Payton was educated in the public schools of Butler County and grew up on his father’s farm. Before he attained his majority he enlisted in Company A of the Thirty-second Regiment, United States Volunteer Infantry, and spent two years as a soldier in the Philippines. He made a good record in the army and his interest in military affairs had been unabated to the present time. In 1905 Mr. Payton bought the Burns Oitizen at Burns in Marion County, edited and published it three years, and selling out acquired the Bulletin at Florene, Kansas, having charge...

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Biography of Paul J. McBride

Every one who had had any relations with the Department of Labor in the state government during the last year realizes that Governor Capper could not have made a better ehoice for the office of State Labor Commission than when he selected Paul J. McBride for these important responsibilities. To his official duties Mr. McBride brought a long and varied experience, most of it obtained in the ranks of organized labor. He is in close touch with the men who toil and he also had that breadth of mind and sympathies which are the fruit of association with people and affairs in more than one field of work and in more than one locality. He had been a farmer, a machinist, both a worker and an employer, and for many years was active in railroad service. He was born in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, June 8, 1860, one of four children, all of whom are still living, and whose parents were David N. and Jane (Clarke) McBride. His father was born in Lawrence County and his mother in Washington County, Pennsylvania. When a young man David N. McBride learned the tailor’s trade, but most of his career was spent as a farmer. When the news of the discovery of gold on the Pacific coast reached his part of the county, he was one of those who eagerly accepted the opportunity...

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Biography of Rev. John Dunbar

Rev. John Dunbar was a missionary to the Pawnes Indians of the West for a period of more than twenty years before he became a resident of Kansas. He spent a little over a year in the territory and, as its first treasurer, assisted in the organization of Brown County. Mr. Dunbar was a native of Palmer, Massachusetts, born March 3, 1804. In 1832 he was graduated at Williams College, and later at the Auburn Theological Seminary. While a student at the latter institution he received an appointment as missionary to the western Indians; was ordained at Ithaca, New York, May 1, 1834, and on the 5th left there, with instructions to cross the Rocky Mountains to the Nez Perces. Upon arriving at St. Louis on the 23d, he learned that the party of traders with whom he was to travel had already left for the West, but was informed at the same time that the Pawnee tribe needed missionaries, and he decided to go there. As soon as possible he reported at the agency at Bellevue, nine miles above the mouth of the Platte River, on the west bank of the Missouri, and began his work as missionary. In September, 1836, he returned to Massachusetts, and while there superintended the printing of a book of seventy-four pages in the Pawnee language. On Jannary 12, 1837, he married Miss...

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Biographical Sketch of Josiah Miller

Josiah Miller, a pioneer newspaper man of Lawrence and Kansas, an ardent free-soiler and public official in the formative periods of the territory and the state, was born in Chester District, South Carolina, November 12, 1828. He gradnated from the Indiana University in 1851, and from the law school at Poughkeepsie, New York, and in August, 1854, came to Kansas. As his father had been waylaid and mobbed because of his anti-slavery views, it was but natural that Josiah should be an ardent opponent of slavery, and on January 5, 1855, he began the publication of the Kansas Free State at Lawrence. A pro-slavery jury found an indictment against him for maintaining a nuisance in its publication, and on May 21, 1856, his printing office was destroyed by the territorial anthorities. In that year he made speeches in several states for John C. Fremont, the republican candidate for president, and in 1857 was elected probate judge of Douglas County. In 1861 he was a member of the first State Senate, but resigned his seat in that body to become postmaster at Lawrence. In 1863 he was appointed a paymaster in the army, with the rank of major, and in 1866 was elected a member of the Legislature. His death occurred at Lawrence on July 7, 1870, after having a leg amputated. The inscription on the monument erected to his...

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Biographical Sketch of Edmond H. Madison

Edmond H. Madison, of Wichita, who died while serving his third term in Congress, was of the younger generation of the energetic and able members of the bench and bar in Kansas. He was born at Plymouth, Hancock County, Illinois, December 18, 1865, educated in the common schools and at the age of eighteen years began teaching. In 1885 he went to Wichita, Kansas, where he studied law in the office of G. W. C. Jones; and in 1888 was admitted to the bar. The same year he was elected county attorney of Ford County, which office he held for two terms. On January 1, 1900, he was appointed judge of the Thirty-first Judicial District and served in that capacity until September 17, 1906, when he resigned to enter the race for Congress. He was elected as the representative of the Seventh Congressional District that year, re-elected in 1908 and again in 1910, but died suddenly from apoplexy while seated at the breakfast table on the morning of September 18, 1911, before completing his third term. While in Congress Mr. Madison was a stanch supporter of President Roosevelt’s policies and was a member of the committee to settle the Ballinger-Pinehot eontroversy. He was president of the Kansas League of Republican Clubs in 1896-97, was a active member of the Sons of Veterans; was frequently called upon to serve as...

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Biography of John J. Ingalls

John J. Ingalls was a genius and one of the most versatile statesmen, scholars and writers which Kansas had produced. He was born at Middletown, Massachusetts, December 29, 1833, a son of Elias T. and Eliza (Chase) Ingalls, and a descendant of Edmond Ingalls, who, with his brother Francis, founded the town of Lynn, Massachusetts, in 1628. Mr. Ingalls graduated at Williams College, Massachusetts, in 1855, and two years later was admitted to the bar in his native county of Essex. In 1858 he came to Kansas and served as a member of the Wyandotte constitutional convention in 1859, in the following year being elected secretary of the territorial council. While secretary of the State Senate in 1861, at the first session of the Legislature, he submitted a design for a state seal, and in 1862 was elected to the State Senate. During the Civil war he served as judge advocate on the staff of Gen. George W. Deitzler, with the rank of lieutenant colonel, and in 1864 was nominated for lieutenant governor on the “Anti-Lane” ticket. Mr. Ingalls’ first election to the United States Senate, in 1873, as the successor of Samuel C. Pomeroy, followed one of the most sensational scenes which ever occurred in a nominating convention, and, as elsewhere narrated, marked Mr. Pomeroy’s permanent elimination from politics. He was twice re-elected and served in the Senate...

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