Select Page

Collection: Indian Treaties Acts and Agreements

Treaty of January 8, 1821

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty entered into at the Indian Spring, in the Creek Nation, by Daniel M. Forney, of the State of North Carolina, and David Meriwether, of the State of Georgia, specially appointed for that purpose, on the part of the United States; and the Chiefs, Head Men, and Warriors, of the Creek Nation, in council assembled. Article 1. The Chiefs, Head Men, and Warriors, of the Creek Nation, in behalf of the said nation, do, by these presents, cede to the United States all that tract or parcel of land, situate, lying, and being, east of the following bounds and limits, viz: Beginning on the east bank of Flint river, where Jackson’s line crosses, running thence, up the eastern bank of the same, along the water’s edge, to the head of the principal western branch; from thence, the nearest and a direct line, to the Chatahooche river, up the eastern bank of the said river, along the water’s edge, to the shallow Ford, where the present boundary line between the state of Georgia and the Creek nation touches the said river: Provided, however, That, if the said line should strike the Chatahooche river, below the Creek village Buzzard-Roost, there shall be a set-off made, so as to leave the said village one mile within...

Read More

Treaty of January 22, 1818

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of limits between the United States and the Creek nation of Indians, made and concluded at the Creek Agency, on Flint river, the twenty-second day of January, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and eighteen. JAMES MONROE, President of the United States of America, by David Brydie Mitchell, of the state of Georgia, agent of Indian affairs for the Creek nation, and sole commissioner, specially appointed for that purpose, on the one part, and the undersigned kings, chiefs, head men, and warriors, of the Creek nation, in council assembled, on behalf of the said nation, of the other part, have entered into the following articles and conditions, viz: Article 1. The said kings, chiefs, head men, and warriors, do hereby agree, in consideration of certain sums of money to be paid to the said Creek nation, by the government of the United States, as hereinafter stipulated, to cede and forever quit claim, [and do, in behalf of their said nation, hereby cede, relinquish, and forever quit claim,] unto the United States, all right, title, and interest, which the said nation have, or claim, in or unto, the two following tracts of land, situate, lying, and being, within the following bounds; that is to say: 1st. Beginning at the mouth of...

Read More

Agreement of June 29, 1825

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Council House, Broken Arrow, Creek Nation, 29 June, 1825. Resolved by the Chiefs and Warriors in Council assembled that after a suitable consideration which the nature of the case demands, they solemnly and strictly declare for themselves and for the whole Muscogee Nation, that all of the late General McIntosh’s party who have opposed the Laws of the Nation, are hereby pardoned to all intents and purposes, and they are hereby invited to return to their usual places of abode or elsewhere, and their to dwell in the full enjoyment of peace & security and of all their rights and privileges guaranteed to them by our Laws. The property which they have with them, & that which is in the Nation owned by them when they left it is theirs. Such of their property as may have been lost or destroyed contrary to the known laws of the Nation which once belonged to General McIntosh & Samuel Hawkins or others shall be restored or paid for to the proper owners by the Nation whenever it shall appear to the satisfaction of the United States Agent after hearing both parties in Council that it was or any part of it taken or destroyed contrary to the Laws of the Nation. Either party may appeal from the decision...

Read More

Indian Treaties Omaha to Ottawa

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now We have treaties for the Omaha, Oneida, Onondaga, Osage, Oto and Ottawa Tribes. These treaties provide a unique history specific to many tribes, and often contain names of Native Americans and Whites living at that time. Omaha Treaties (Omahawa) Treaty of July 15, 1830 Treaty of 16 March 1854 Treaty of March 6, 1865 Oneida Treaties Treaty of October 22, 1784 Treaty of January 9, 1789 Agreement of April 24, 1792 Treaty of December 2, 1794 Treaty of January 15, 1838 Treaty of February 3, 1838 Onondaga Treaties Treaty of October 22, 1784 Treaty of January 9, 1789 Agreement of April 24, 1792 Treaty of January 5, 1838 Osage Treaties Treaty of November 10, 1808 Treaty of September 12, 1815 Treaty of September 25, 1818 Treaty of August 31, 1822 Treaty of June 2, 1825 Treaty of August 10, 1825 Treaty of August 24, 1835 Treaty of January 11, 1839 Treaty of September 29, 1865 Agreement of September 13, 1865 Oto Treaties (Ottoe) Treaty of June 24, 1817 Treaty of September 26, 1825 Treaty of July 15, 1830 Treaty of September 21, 1833 Treaty of October 15, 1836 Treaty of December 9, 1854 Treaty of March 15, 1854 Ottawa Treaties (Ottowa, Ottoway) Treaty of January 21, 1785 Treaty of January 9, 1789 Treaty of August 3, 1795...

Read More

Treaty of July 29, 1829

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Prairie du Chien, in the Territory of Michigan, between the United States of America, by their Commissioners, General John McNeil, Colonel Pierre Menard, and Caleb Atwater, Esq. and the United Nations of Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatamie Indians, of the waters of the Illinois, Milwaukee, and Manitoouck Rivers. Article 1. The aforesaid nations of Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatamie Indians, do hereby cede to the United States aforesaid, all the lands comprehended within the following limits, to wit: Beginning at the Winnebago Village, on Rock river, forty miles from its mouth, and running thence down the Rock river, to a line which runs due west from the most southern bend of Lake Michigan to the Mississippi river, and with that line to the Mississippi river opposite to Rock Island; thence, up that river, to the United States’ reservation at the mouth of the Ouisconsin; thence, with the south and east lines of said reservation, to the Ouisconsin river; thence, southerly, passing the heads of the small streams emptying into the Mississippi, to the Rock River aforesaid, at the Winnebago Village, the place of beginning. And, also, one other tract of land, described as follows, to wit: Beginning on the Western Shore of Lake Michigan, at the northeast corner of the...

Read More

Treaty of September 26, 1825

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now For the purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, of the United States’ army, and Major Benjamin O’Fallon, Indian Agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Head-men, and Warriors, of the said Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians, on behalf of their tribe, of the other part, have made and entered into the following articles and conditions, which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding on both parties—to wit: Article I. It is admitted by the Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians, that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection. The said tribe also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them. Article II. The United States agree to receive the Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians into their friendship, and under their protection,...

Read More

Treaty of June 2, 1825

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded at St. Louis, in the State of Missouri, between William Clark, Superintendent of Indian Affairs, Commissioner on the part of the United States, and the undersigned, Chiefs, Head-Men, and Warriors, of the Great and Little Osage Tribes of Indians, duly authorized and empowered by their respective Tribes or Nations. In order more effectually to extend to said Tribes that protection of the Government so much desired by them, it is agreed as follows: Article I. The Great and Little Osage Tribes or Nations do, hereby, cede and relinquish to the United States, all their right, title, interest, and claim, to lands lying within the State of Missouri and Territory of Arkansas, and to all lands lying West of the said State of Missouri and Territory of Arkansas, North and West of the Red River, South of the Kansas River, and East of a line to be drawn from the head sources of the Kansas, Southwardly through the Rock Saline, with such reservations, for such considerations, and upon such terms as are hereinafter specified, expressed, and provided for. Article II. Within the limits of the country, above ceded and relinquished, there shall be reserved, to, and for, the Great and Little Osage Tribes or Nations, aforesaid, so long as they...

Read More

Treaty of August 31, 1822

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a Treaty, entered into and concluded at the United States’ Factory on the M. De Cigue Augt. by and between Richard Graham, Agent of Indian Affairs, authorized on the part of the United States for that purpose, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the Tribes of Great and Little Osage Indians, for themselves and their respective Tribes, of the other part. Whereas, by the second article of the Treaty made and entered into between the United States and the Great and Little Osage nation of Indians, concluded and signed at Fort Clark, on the Missouri, on the tenth day of November, one thousand eight hundred and eight (Treaty of 10 November 1808), it is stipulated that the United States shall establish at that place, and permanently continue, at all seasons of the year, a well assorted store of goods, for the purpose of bartering with them on moderate terms for their peltries and furs: Now, we, the said Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, in behalf of our said Tribes, for and in consideration of two thousand three hundred and twenty-nine dollars and forty cents, to us now paid in merchandise, out of the United States’ Factory, by said Richard Graham, on behalf of the United States, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged,...

Read More

Indian Treaties Navaho to Noo-Wha-Ha

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now We have treaties for the Navaho, New York, Nez Percé, Nisqually and Noo-Wha-Ha Tribes. These treaties provide a unique history specific to many tribes, and often contain names of Native Americans and Whites living at that time. Navaho Indian Treaties (Navaho) Treaty of September 9, 1849 Treaty of June 1, 1868 New York Indian Treaties Treaty of January 15, 1838 Nez Percé Treaties Treaty of 11 June 1855 Treaty of October 17, 1855 Treaty of June 9, 1863 Treaty of August 13, 1868 Nisqually Treaties (Nisqualli) Treaty of December 26, 1854 Noo-Wha-Ha Treaty of January 22,...

Read More

Indian Treaties Pawnee to Rogue River

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now We have treaties for the Pawnee, Peoria, Piankashaw, Piegan, Ponca, Potawatomi, Puyallup, Quapaw, Qui-Nai-Elt, Quil-Leh-Ute, Ricara, and Rogue River Tribes. These treaties provide a unique history specific to many tribes, and often contain names of Native Americans and Whites living at that time. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe. Pawnee Treaties Treaty of June 18, 1818 Treaty of June 19, 1818 Treaty of June 20, 1818 Treaty of June 22, 1818 Treaty of September 30, 1825 Treaty of October 9, 1833 Treaty of August 6, 1848 Treaty of September 24, 1857 Peoria Treaties Treaty of September 25, 1818 Treaty of October 27, 1832 Treaty of May 30, 1854 Treaty of February 23, 1867 Piankashaw Treaties Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 7, 1803 Treaty of August 27, 1804 Treaty of December 30, 1805 Treaty of July 18, 1815 Agreement of January 3, 1818 Treaty of October 29, 1832 Treaty of May 30, 1854 Treaty of February 23, 1867 Piegan Treaties Treaty of October 17, 1855 Ponca Treaties (Poncar, Poncarar) Treaty of June 25, 1817 Treaty of June 9, 1825 Treaty of March 12, 1858 Treaty of March 10, 1865 Potawatomi Treaties 1Other Potawatomi Tribe names used, (Potawatami, Potawatamie, Putawatimi, Pattawatima, Patawattimie, Pottawatami, Pottawatimie, Potowatomi, Potawattimie, Pottawattimie,...

Read More

Treaty of September 19, 1827

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty between the United States and the Potawatamie Tribe of Indians. In order to consolidate some of the dispersed bands of the Potawatamie Tribe in the Territory of Michigan at a point removed from the road leading from Detroit to Chicago, and as far as practicable from the settlements of the Whites, it is agreed that the following tracts of land, heretofore reserved for the use of the said Tribe, shall be, and they are hereby, ceded to the United States. Two sections of land on the river Rouge at Seginsairn’s village. Two sections of land at Tonguish’s village, near the river Rouge. That part of the reservation at Macon on the river Raisin, which yet belongs to the said tribe, containing six sections, excepting therefrom one half of a section where the Potawatamie Chief Moran resides, which shall be reserved for his use. One tract at Mang ach qua village, on the river Peble, of six miles square. One tract at Mickesawbe, of six miles square. One tract at the village of Prairie Ronde, of three miles square. One tract at the village of Match e be nash she wish, at the head of the Kekalamazoo river, of three miles square, which tracts contain in the whole ninety nine sections and one half section...

Read More

Treaty of June 25, 1817

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded between William Clark and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners on the part and behalf of the United states of America, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors of the Poncarar tribe of Indians, on the [their] part and of their said tribe of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-established peace and friendship between the United States and their said tribe, and of being placed, in all things and every respect, upon the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the said Poncarar tribe; and all the friendly relations that existed between them before the war shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Article III. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, sovereign,...

Read More

Agreement of January 3, 1818

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Contract entered into under the authority of the United States, between governor Thomas Posey, superintendent of Indian affairs, and Chekommia or Big River, principal chief of the Piankeshaws. This indenture, made this third day of January, 1818, between governor Thomas Posey, superintendent of Indian affairs, on the one part, and Chekommia or Big River, principal chief of the Piankeshaw tribe of Indians, acting as well in his own name, as in the name and behalf of the said Piankeshaw tribe of Indians, on the other part, witnesseth: Whereas, at a treaty held under the authority of the United States, with the chiefs and head men of the said Piankeshaw nation of Indians, at Vincennes, in the Indiana territory, the 27th day of August, 1804, and William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian Affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States, for concluding any treaty or treaties with said tribe, it was agreed by said William Henry Harrison, on the one part, and the chiefs and head men of said tribe, on the other; that the Piankeshaw tribe, for the consideration therein mentioned, should cede and relinquish to the United States forever, all that tract of country, which lies between the Wabash and the tract ceded by the Kaskaskia tribe, in the year...

Read More

Treaty of July 18, 1815

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at Portage des Sioux between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Piankishaw Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part. The parties being anxious of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the Piankishaw tribe or nation. Article III. The contracting parties, in the sincerity of mutual friendship, recognize, re-establish, and confirm, all and every treaty, contract, or agreement, heretofore concluded between the United States and the said Piankishaw tribe or nation. In witness of all and every thing herein determined between the...

Read More

Treaty of August 6, 1848

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaty with the Pawnees; articles of agreement and convention made this sixth day of August, A. D. 1848, at Fort Childs, near the head of Grand Island, on the south side of the Nebraska or Great Platte River, between Lieutenant-Colonel Ludwell E. Powell, commanding battalion Missouri Mounted Volunteers, en route to Oregon, in behalf of the United States, and the chiefs and head-men of the four confederated bands of Pawnees, viz: Grand Pawnees, Pawnee Loups, Pawnee Republicans, and Pawnee Tappage, at present residing on the south side of the Platte River. Article I.The confederated bands of the Pawnees hereby cede and relinquish to the United States all their right, title, and interest in and to all that tract of land described as follows, viz: Commencing on the south side of the Platte River, five miles west of this post, “Fort Childs;” thence due north to the crest of the bluffs north of said Platte River: thence east and along the crest of said bluffs to the termination of Grand Island, supposed to be about sixty miles distant; thence south to the southern shore of said Platte River: and thence west and along the southern shore of the said Platte River to the place of beginning. The land hereby conveyed is designated within the red lines of...

Read More

Search

Genealogy Specials and Codes

Access Genealogy is the largest free genealogy website not owned by Ancestry.com. As such, it relies on the revenue from commercial genealogy companies such as Ancestry and Fold3 to pay for the server and other expenses related to producing and warehousing such a large collection of data. If you're considering joining either of these programs, please join from our pages, and help support free genealogy online!


Free Shipping with DNA Kit Purchase! Use Code: FREESHIPDNA


40% Off -
Special Offer for Fold3


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest