Collection: History of the Pacific Northwest Oregon and Washington 1889

Biography of Charles Nickell

CHARLES NICKELL. – Among the young men of ability and energy in the Pacific Northwest who have come to the front through their own efforts is the gentleman whose name is given above. He is a native of the Golden state, having been born at Yreka in 1856. The advantages for receiving an education in early days were not good; but, notwithstanding this fact, his natural push gave impetus to a spirit to improve each opportunity for storing his mind with that which would fit him for a sphere of usefulness in the future; and so well did he succeed that at the age of thirteen years he was assistant teacher at Yreka with Professor William Duenkal. In 1869 he quit that most trying of all pursuits, and in 1870 entered the office of the Yreka Journal, completing his printer’s apprenticeship in twenty months. In 1871 he permanently removed to Jacksonville, and worked as compositor and reporter on the Democratic Times until December, 1872, when, at the age of sixteen years, he formed a partnership with P.D. Hull, and launched out as a full-fledged journalist by the purchase of that paper. The great fire in 1873 swept away the office and entire plant in common with other buildings. But the Times existed in a few active brains, not simply in types and plates, and was running as lively as...

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Biography of Johnson Mulkey

JOHNSON MULKEY. – This prominent pioneer of Oregon was born in Knox County, Kentucky, in January, 1808. His father, Philip Mulkey, and mother (whose maiden name was Margaret Miller), were natives of Germany. In the year 1818 they moved with their young family to Missouri, settling in Lafayette County, where the father soon after died, leaving his widow with nine children. Johnson was married in 1835 to Mrs. Susan Roberts, née Brown. In the summer of 1845 he crossed the plains to Oregon, and on arriving took up a land claim in Benton county three miles west of what is now Corvallis. Returning to Missouri in 1846, in the spring of 1847 he again started westward, accompanied by his family, two brothers, Luke and Thomas, with their families, and also a large number of old friends and neighbors. The company brought a large herd of cattle. after a summer’s long, hard travel, so well remembered by all early pioneers, they arrived in the Willamette valley in the month of October. Mr. Mulkey engaged in the avocation of rearing and dealing in stock. His home was always open to new settlers, whom he assisted according to their necessities with work, seeds, and kind, encouraging words. Finding the church organization to which he belonged struggling to gain a foothold in the new country, he immediately connected therewith and contributed liberally toward...

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Biography of William Munks

WILLIAM MUNKS. – Mr. Munks, an excellent portrait of whom is placed in this history, is a veteran of several wars, as well as a pioneer, trapper and scout in the early days of the Pacific coast. He is to-day one of the most widely known men on Puget Sound, being often called “king of the Fidalgo Island” as he was the first white man to locate on its shores. It was then a part of Whatcom County, Washington Territory, but is now included in the boundary of Skagit. Mr. Munk was the first white man that lived within the present confines of the latter county, and was born in Canton, Ohio. At the early age of six years he suffered the loss, by death, of his father. Upon the breaking out of the war with Mexico, he enlisted in the Fifteenth Infantry, United States volunteers, under General (then Colonel) George W. Morgan, with whom he remained until the close of hostilities. The military record of the family is rather bright, his grandfather having served in the war for independence, his father in the war of 1812, and his only brother following the fortunes of Sherman on his march to the sea. In 1849 he left the East to seek his fortune in the far West. After hunting and trapping for a time on the western slope of the...

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Biography of Hon. Jackson L. Morrow

HON. JACKSON L. MORROW.- It is not so uncommon a thing in this land of a great future for a man to lay out a town or build a city; but there is, we believe, but one man in the state who may be called the maker of a county, and whose name is perpetuated in its designation: that man is Jackson L. Morrow, of Heppner, Oregon, whose sketch is here presented. This honor was worthily bestowed upon him at the instance and almost insistence of his neighbors, in recognition of his privations and labors in settling up the region, in building Heppner, and in securing the division of Morrow county from Umatilla. A region which was once regarded as inaccessible and desolate has now become, by the efforts of a driving body of men, beginning with Mr. Morrow and Mr. Heppner, a thriving and prosperous portion of Oregon. The population of the county is now six thousand, and of Heppner itself about one thousand, with a good outlook in the near future for five thousand. A branch line of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company brings the city within easy reach of all the markets, and taps a great grain and grazing belt. The first settler upon the townsite of the city was G.W. Standsbury. Morrow and Heppner came next; and together they set in operation the works...

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Biography of Col. La Fayette Mosher

COL. LA FAYETTE MOSHER. – There is perhaps no resident of Oregon more widely known and generally respected than L.F. Mosher. He has held so many prominent positions, and is so well qualified to fill them, that it only seems a natural thing to see him in the senate, and as a justice of the supreme court. He was born in Benton County, Kentucky, September 1, 1824. So entirely did he bend his energies tot he gaining of an education, that at the age of nineteen years we find him a graduate of Woodward College, Cincinnati, where he carried off honors on June 30, 1843. After graduating, he acted as deputy clerk of the supreme court of Hamilton County, where he remained until the breaking out of the Mexican war. He at once came valiantly forward and joined the Fourth Ohio Regiment, and served in the brigade of General Joseph Lane until the close of the war. When the war was ended he entered the law office of Pugh & Pendleton, the members of the firm being ex-Senator George E. Pugh, now deceased, and ex-Senator George H. Pendleton. He was admitted to the bar in May, 1852, and at once began the practice of his profession in Cincinnati. He came to Oregon with General Lane in 1853, landing in Portland in May of that year. The following months he...

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Biography of Sidney Walter Moss

SIDNEY WALTER MOSS. – Mr. Moss is a venerable and noticeable character among the pioneers, not only for his long residence in Oregon, but for the esteem in which he has ever been held by the people. He has, in an eminent degree, that quality for which the early Oregonians have been remarkable, – liberality. He was born in Paris, Kentucky, March 17,1810. His father, Moses Moss, was a Baptist minister; and his mother, Katherine Buckford Moss, was a woman of great force and elevation of character. The young man learned the trade of stone-cutting, and in 1828 left Kentucky for Ohio. He found an abundance of work in the Buckeye state, but in 1837 went on to Indiana, working at Madison and on the Madison & Indianapolis Railway. At the state capital he erected two bank buildings. In 1839 he was back in Kentucky working on lock three on the Licking river canal. In 1841 he was at Fort Smith in full charge of the stone-cutting department in work then under construction. But a desire for the wild West there overtook him; and he joined the company of Doctor White for Oregon. That was the first genuine immigration; and the particulars are given elsewhere. At Waiilatpu Mr. Moss met Doctor Whitman, and remembers his inquiries about the Ashburton treaty, and in what shape Oregon would be left, and...

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Biography of M. J. Morlan

M.J. MORLAN. – This prominent citizen of The Dalles was born in Lake County, Ohio, in 1835. In 1846 he moved to La Salle County, Illinois. In that state his parents were successful in securing good land and in improving their farms; and this was the home of our subject until he attained his majority. With a somewhat limited education, but with abundance of muscle and determination, he began life for himself working as a hired hand on his father’s farm, and saving nearly all his earnings. His innate ambition and desire to reach the higher walks of life induced him to cross the plains in1857 to Portland, Oregon. Being but ill suited with this Webfoot metropolis, he returned eastward as far as Walla Walla and found a desirable location on the Touchet River, improving his own place and assisting the various ranchers until, in1860, he was able to buy a ranch at Dayton. His venture there, however, proving but a partial success, he disposed of his property in 1864, and removed again to Western Oregon, returning eastward in 1867 to Wasco County and engaging in sheep-husbandry. The first four years of that occupation were but little remunerative; and in 1871 he moved to Umatilla county, engaging very successfully in agriculture. In 1873 he was married to Miss Mary E. Jones, who has born him two children, Charles and...

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Biography of Robert Wilson Morrison

ROBERT WILSON MORRISON. – This leading pioneer of the immigration of 1844 was born March 14, 1811, in Fleming County, Kentucky, of Scotch parentage. In 1822 he moved with his parents to Montgomery County, Missouri, living with them until his marriage in 1831, to Miss Nancy Irwin. Two years later a move was made to Clay County, and thence to Clinton County, on the border of the territory occupied by the Indians of the plains. Upon the consummation of the “Platte purchase,” he moved with his family into that frontier region, and for six years lived in Andrew County. The excitement and interest in respect to Oregon was then, in 1843-44, reaching a high pitch among the people of the frontier; and in that particular neighborhood the Oregon fever was still further inflamed by letters from a man named Smith, formerly of that section, but then in Oregon, who was urging his people to come to the land by the Pacific Ocean. Indeed, all information obtainable was found to be favorable to Oregon; and, in time for the trip next season, Mr. Morrison was among the number who were armed, equipped and well prepared for the march across the plains. His wife and six children were of course to accompany him; and there were two young men taken into the family as fellow-travelers, – John Minto and Willard H....

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Biography of John H. Moores

J.H. MOORES. – Among the immigrants who came to the Sate of Oregon in 1852 was Honorable John H. Moores, the subject of this sketch, who deserves more than passing mention for the service rendered by him to the commonwealth during an active business career in the state extending over a period of twenty-eight years. Among the older residents who played a prominent part in the earlier development of the state was his father, the late Colonel I.B. Moores, Sr., whose love of novelty and adventure brought him as one of the first pioneers to Oregon, where he located in Lane county. He was a man of great energy and activity, and had seen considerable military service, having served in the Seminole Indian war in two campaigns with Jackson in Florida. He also commanded a regiment in the Black Hawk war in 1831, and afterwards in 1846 enlisted for the Mexican war. He came to the Sate of Oregon in 1852, locating near Eugene. He represented Lane county in the legislative assembly, and afterwards in 1857 in the state constitutional convention. He was afterwards, a Republican candidate for state senator from the county. He died in 1861, and is buried in the Odd Fellows Rural Cemetery near Salem. John H. Moores was born on the 21st of June, 1821, near Huntsville, in Lawrence county, Alabama, where he remained until...

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Biography of Lee Moorhouse

LEE MOORHOUSE. – It was some years before the Inland Empire realized its own wealth. The hills were formerly accounted worthless. Mr. Moorhouse was among the first to dissipate that notion. The Prospect Hill farm, of four thousand acres, eighteen miles west of Pendleton, of which he was superintendent, during his incumbency of four years, produced two hundred and fifty thousand bushels of wheat. The Moorhouses were from Iowa, Lee having been born there in 1850. They came to Oregon in 1861, locating in Umatilla county, near the present site of Pendleton, and when the country was so sparsely settled that no more than fifteen families could be found within a radius of twenty-five miles of that point. The father bought a squatt4er’s right near Walla Walla; and Lee, at the tender age of fourteen, set off for a tour of the mines in Idaho and British Columbia. Despite his youth he met with fair success. Returning home he attended school at Walla Walla for some years, and studied civil engineering under Horace Hurlburt on the Oregon & California Railroad. Coming to Pendleton, he was appointed county surveyor by a Democratic board of commissioners, although he was himself an ardent Republican. Four years passing away, he engaged in business with the pioneer merchant, Lot Livermore, and subsequently with John R. Foster at Umatilla. The Bannack outbreak of 1878 now...

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Biography of Rev. Jesse Moreland

REV. JESSE MORELAND. – But few, if any, stand higher socially, morally or in the estimation of their neighbors and friends than the grand man whose name calls forth this brief pen-and-ink sketch. We do not attempt to give the likeness of the man drawn from opinion. Our purpose is to sketch what he is in a few selected facts from his life. With this intention, what we have essayed to give to the public will furnish an instance of the influence of piety and industry, united with sound common-sense, in giving a noble character a distinguished position and eminent usefulness. His name is a synonym for all that is true and honorable in a man. The early settlers of Oregon, as well as others of more recent date, honor the name of Jesse Moreland for his liberality, hospitality, and absolute and uncorruptible integrity. His clear and discriminating mind, impartial judgement, strong, practical good sense, and a profound and instinctive sense of right and wrong, patience in investigation, and a sincere, earnest desire to reach just and correct conclusions, lead to the inevitable conviction that, had he sought position in public life, he would have been pre-eminently a christian statesman; and a christian statesman is the glory of his country. We find him like many of America’s noblemen, – rising from a humble origin, without artificial aid, and with...

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Biographical Sketch of Edward B. Morelock

EDWARD B. MORELOCK. – Mr. Morelock was born in Missouri in 1845. While but a child of two years he suffered the loss of his father, who, as sheriff of Sullivan County, was killed by the owner of property that he was selling under execution. Upon the outbreak of the Rebellion, Edward, a youth of sixteen, joined the Missouri state militia, and in 1863 and enlisted in the Forty-second Missouri Volunteer Infantry, wherein he served until the end of the war. In 1865 he crossed the plains to Oregon, locating near Summerville in Union county, where he took a claim and farmed and raised stock until 1881. In that year he sold his realty and located in the town of Summerville, engaging in the agricultural implement business, in which he still continues. He has been city marshal ever since the incorporation of the place in 1885. He has also acted as deputy sheriff, and has served in similar capacities in connection with his regular business. During the Nez Perce trouble of 1877 he was a member of Captain William Booth’s company of Grande Ronde volunteers. He was also a lieutenant in Captain Morant’s company of volunteers during the Bannack war of 1878. He was married in Missouri in 1864 to Miss Rebecca, daughter of Joseph and Mary Ann Harris, of a noted family in that...

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Biography of Hon. Zenas Ferry Moody

HON. Z.F. MOODY. – Zenas Ferry Moody, ex-Governor of the State of Oregon, was born on the 27th of May, 1832, in Granby, Massachusetts. His father was Major Thomas H. Moody. His mother was Hannah M. Ferry, an aunt of ex-Senator T.W. Ferry, of Michigan, formerly vice-president of the United States. Governor Moody comes of good old New England Revolutionary stock, his grandfather, Gideon Moody, having borne arms as a soldier during the Revolutionary war. He has proved himself worthy of his lineage; and the principles which he imbibed on New England soil have been the guide of his whole subsequent life. The sturdy virtues of that stock are too well known to require comment; they have become historical. The public men of New England have led the van in every reform, and have taken a most prominent part in molding all of that history of which the American people are most proud. New England ideas have been infused throughout the whole of our national life; and we have come to expect from men of New England ancestry those sturdy qualities which have contributed so largely to our happiness and prosperity as a people. Mr. Moody’s childhood was spent in Granby. January, 1848, he removed to Chicopee, Massachusetts, where he remained the ensuing three years. On the 14th of March, 1851, he sailed from New York to Oregon by...

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Biographical Sketch of Matthew W. Mitchell

MATTHEW W. MITCHELL. – This representative man of Eastern Oregon was born in Missouri in 1843, and with his parents crossed the plains to the Pacific Northwest in 1852. The first winter was passed by the family at Portland; and the year following a Donation claim was selected and a home made at Looking Glass, in Douglas county. Our subject was there raised, and at Roseburg received his education. In 1866 he was so far equipped as to begin school-teaching, and for some years followed that as a profession. In 1870 he was united in marriage with Miss Josephine Stevens, of Looking Glass, and the same year removed to the Grande Ronde. He there engaged in stock-raising and farming. He became prominent in the political circles of that region, being elected in 1876 as representative from Union county to the Oregon legislature. His first wife having died in 1871, he was married secondly in 1882 to Miss Jessie Ritchie, of Multnomah county, who is also deceased. Mr. Mitchell is still engaged in farming at The Cove, Oregon, owning two hundred acres of excellent land, and also devotes much attention to the rearing of graded stock. He is a man of recognized worth, and of wide...

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Biography of Captain Z. C. Norton

CAPTAIN Z.C. NORTON. – Of the early pioneers to Oregon who were natives of the Pine Tree state, the subject of this sketch occupied a prominent place during his life. He was born in Farmington, Maine, December 29, 1808, and when fourteen years of age was sent to sea by his father for the purpose of learning navigation, and gaining possible promotion to the captaincy of a vessel. His patron was an old friend of his parents, and was the commander of the vessel in which our subject began his travels on the briny deep. By close attention to the duties of his calling, he rapidly rose in the estimation of shipowners, and on the arrival of his majority was given the command of a vessel. In 1833 he was married to Miss Caroline Norton, and took his bride on board of his vessel; and for ten years its cabin was their home. during that time he was in the European and West India trade, and by his energetic management and business tact accumulated sums sufficient to purchase an interest at different times in various vessels. In 1847 he built the brig Sequin, and in her made several trips to the West Indies and to South American ports. While in the latter trade there occurred the circumstances which brought about his coming to the Pacific coast, and his subsequent...

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