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Collection: Parsons and Abbott Roll

1832 Creek Census – Cussetaw Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Cussetaw. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Cussetaw01Ne har Micco56415principal chief Cussetaw02Tus ke he ne haw Choo ley1113principal chief Cussetaw03Ar par lar Tus tun nuck ee3205principal chief Cussetaw04Is far ne E marth lar3407principal chief Cussetaw05Oke fus ke Yo ho lo2507principal chief Cussetaw06Tuck a batch ee Har jo1315principal chief Cussetaw07E far E marth lar241117principal chief Cussetaw08Cus se tau Micco2103principal chief Cussetaw09Mic co Chartee1203principal chief Cussetaw10Eas tee Charco Chopko1102principal chief Cussetaw 101Ko sar Ho po e thle2204 Cussetaw 102Thlar sar way1203 Cussetaw 103Mary1102wife of Joseph Wheeler Cussetaw 104Amanda1102wife of James Callahan Cussetaw 105Tus tun nuck ee1405 Cussetaw 106Wil se2103 Cussetaw 107E marth lar Har jo2406 Cussetaw 108In te narse ho ye2103 Cussetaw 109Po sul le2204 Cussetaw 110Ne har Thlock o1304 Cussetaw 111Mis ke Yar...

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1832 Creek Census – Cubihatcha Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Cubihatcha. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Cubihatcha1Peter Anderson2002 Cubihatcha2Mut teach kar1102 Cubihatcha3Sucky1203 Cubihatcha4Sam ar erkly1203 Cubihatcha5So lo di ga2204 Cubihatcha6Thomas Barefoot4307 Cubihatcha7William McGirth3328 Cubihatcha8Benjamin Walker2204 Cubihatcha9Thomas Piegeon2305 Cubihatcha10Betsy Piegeon0202 Cubihatcha11Fin ni har1102 Cubihatcha12Car bieth car1102 Cubihatcha13Joseph Pieggieon2305 Cubihatcha14Patta4105 Cubihatcha15Con chart3205 Cubihatcha16Chu culis Har go2103 Cubihatcha17Ta wos sa Micco2103 Cubihatcha18Pin Har go1102 Cubihatcha19David Piegeon2305 Cubihatcha20Cho nat kar1102 Cubihatcha21Thick han nick1102 Cubihatcha22William Walker323237 Cubihatcha23Mary Wills0202 Cubihatcha24Good Day2204 Cubihatcha25Ar wat ta liga1102 Cubihatcha26Mahaley Tooley1326 Cubihatcha27Vardy Jolly1405 Cubihatcha28Slar hie4206 Cubihatcha29Homer Har go0202 Cubihatcha30Si ob bie4206 Cubihatcha31Widdow Cornels111012 Cubihatcha32Lit to kie1135 Cubihatcha33Betsy3407a free negro Cubihatcha34Tus ko nar Har jo1102 Cubihatcha35Te me e thli che1102 Cubihatcha36Tal marse Yo ho lo1203(alias...

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1832 Creek Census – Cowyka Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Cowyka. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Cowyka1Yo ho lo Micco5207 Cowyka2E marth lar Tustunnuckee1304 Cowyka3E marth lo che2204 Cowyka4Chot to mic co che3306 Cowyka5Kose hatch ee Marthlar1304 Cowyka6Po fore te1304 Cowyka7Par sock e marth lar2204 Cowyka8Oke o larth le ne har3306 Cowyka9Ha li ke1203 Cowyka10Oke pis Har jo1102 Cowyka11O lar tar mee coo che2103 Cowyka12Me se pe3306 Cowyka13Tup pe ye che1102 Cowyka14OkeolartHar jo2305 Cowyka15Yar har Lar ne4105 Cowyka16Ot to se2305 Cowyka17E sar ke1102 Cowyka18Tol lar Lar ke1102 Cowyka19Chart o Lus te1102 Cowyka20Char ley2305 Cowyka21Se me no ke1203 Cowyka22Tal la see Har jo1102 Cowyka23Tar ho yile te1102 Cowyka24Ke ni ke2204 Cowyka25Ki o ge2103 Cowyka26Fan ny2103wife of Sear Hardridge Cowyka27Ar che we1304 Cowyka28Le te che1102 Cowyka29Ki yar le0202 Cowyka30Fose hatch ee Yo ho...

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1832 Creek Census – Coweta Towns

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Coweta. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Coweta11Kotch ar Tus tun nuck ee1203principal chief Coweta12James Island4408principal chief Coweta13E far Tus ke ne haw1203principal chief Coweta14Absolom Islands1102principal chief Coweta15Jacob Beavers2303principal chief Coweta16Tal marse Har jo2204principal chief Coweta17Char lo Har jo Co cho ko ne3205principal chief Coweta18E marth lar Har jo1203principal chief Coweta19Joseph Marshall421692principal chief Coweta 101Tus ke ne haw1203 Coweta 102Hath lan Har jo2305 Coweta 103Ho lar tar (alias Col. Blue)3205 Coweta 104Oke chun Ho tar te2201 Coweta 105Par hose Har jo3205 Coweta 106Ko wok koo che Yo ho lo1102 Coweta 107Yar te kar Har jo3205 Coweta 108Har pe koo che1102 Coweta 109Thomas Carr121013 Coweta 110Har har lok E marth lar1102 Coweta 111See har ye1102 Coweta 112Chock ko thle0202 Coweta 113See har par...

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1832 Creek Census – Corn House Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Corn House. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Corn House1Artus Har jo1203 Corn House2Og ge de Yo ho lo2204 Corn House3No ko se Yo ho lo1203 Corn House4Ho spo tok Har jo1203 Corn House5Ti ar che Yo ho lo1203 Corn House6Nin o ne heagar0303 Corn House7Tus se ki Chop ko3205 Corn House8Ho bi e Fix i co3104 Corn House9Dick3104 Corn House10Ne har Loc coo che2103 Corn House11Kotch ar Har jo1203 Corn House12Ok ko lo dega2103 Corn House13Ok cos Ne har lock o2103 Corn House14Ti ar che Fix i co1102 Corn House15Ot tus Micco2204 Corn House16See Hoga1203 Corn House17Chok char tee E marth lar2204 Corn House18Cho co was Har jo3104 Corn House19Tin lan nis Har jo3306 Corn House20Wil lie3407 Corn House21Se war lot...

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1832 Creek Census – Coosawda Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Coosawda. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Coosawda1Micco Hatka3205 Coosawda2Coch char Har go1102 Coosawda3No ko sic kar1102 Coosawda4Co lo che E marth lar1102 Coosawda5Ne har Fix i co2305 Coosawda6Tommy Yo ho lo2103 Coosawda7Ech hos Har go3306 Coosawda8Archi Yo ho lo2204 Coosawda9Emarthlo che1102 Coosawda10Al bud dar Har go1102 Coosawda11Toat kar to che1102 Coosawda12Ne har Har go1102 Coosawda13Cus sea tar Har go1102 Coosawda14No sic car Har go1102 Coosawda15Mit tee tar kee2204 Coosawda16Os po dark Har go1102 Coosawda17Samuel Sizemore1102 Coosawda18Sin no che1102 Coosawda19Sic co kie1102 Coosawda20Fus hatch Yo ho lo1102 Coosawda21Con ner hie0202 Coosawda22Hath la1102 Coosawda23Soc coo che0202 Coosawda24Molly0303 Coosawda25In ho kie0202 Coosawda26Konip Har go2002 Coosawda27Tal li ah0202 Coosawda28Tun ho ie0404 Coosawda29Char hie0202 Coosawda30Tal li ka1103 Coosawda31Sekena0202...

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1832 Creek Census – Conchartetie Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Conchartetie. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Conchartetie1Oak choy Fix i co2305 Conchartetie2Cil le boy E marth lar4105 Conchartetie3Ho Tul ga Fix i co1102 Conchartetie4Ko lip Har jo2103 Conchartetie5Tusta nug eigie1102 Conchartetie6O cul lote Nie?1102 Conchartetie7Tal lip Har jo1203 Conchartetie8So co li ga1102 Conchartetie9Emarth Har jo2204 Conchartetie10Tus ke ne3205 Conchartetie11Far ney Fix i co1304 Conchartetie12Ar to tie1102 Conchartetie13Slar fo che2103 Conchartetie14Mi ma1102 Conchartetie15Tal war Har jo2103 Conchartetie16Con chart Fix i co3104 Conchartetie17Thlathlo1102 Conchartetie18Eliza1102 Conchartetie19John2103 Conchartetie20Jim1102 Conchartetie21No ko se Fix i co3205 Conchartetie22Tal la dig Fix i co2204 Conchartetie23Toat ko hos E marth lar1405 Conchartetie24Loney1102 Conchartetie25To car lie2103 Conchartetie26Ar fus kee2103 Conchartetie27Ottis ho bie1102 Conchartetie28Billy2103 Conchartetie29Daniel Bruner4408 Conchartetie30Mosey2103 Conchartetie31Emarth lar Har jo5207 Conchartetie32Peggy2103 Conchartetie33Salli hoga2204 Conchartetie34E Toat Yo ho lo3104 Conchartetie35Pe ti fe1203...

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1832 Creek Census – Clewalla Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Clewalla. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Clewalla1Micco Chopco2204 Clewalla2Micco E marth lar4105 Clewalla3Lar tar Micco2204 Clewalla4Ufawla Tustunnuggy1102 Clewalla5Talledega Tustunnuggy2103 Clewalla6Fus hatch che Micco1102 Clewalla7Micco Har go4206 Clewalla8Woc se Har go1405 Clewalla9Ho loc Ke Yo ho lo2204 Clewalla10Tallessee Hopoiethly5308 Clewalla11Toat Kis Har go2305 Clewalla12Coch che Yo ho lo1102 Clewalla13Ufawla Har go2204 Clewalla14In clannis Har go3306 Clewalla15Paw hos Har go2406 Clewalla16Micco Chitta1506 Clewalla17Clan Tal Fix i co4307 Clewalla18Ne har Yo ho lo2305 Clewalla19W. J. Shumo411217 Clewalla20Le both Ka2204 Clewalla21Peggy Elliott0202 Clewalla22Tatth Hocar1304 Clewathla22Jim Boy25512principal chief Clewalla23Betsey1102 Clewathla23Sangty? Micco??2204principal chief Clewalla24Fitz Tug ga2406 Clewalla25Hick co iega1304 Clewalla26O Sook Fix i co2103 Clewalla27Smed1203 Clewalla28Ca bick Ke Yo ho lo1102 Clewalla29Put it Sar1304 Clewalla30Mith la na ga4206 Clewalla31Fuck os ke1102 Clewalla32Is tin liga0202 Clewalla33Ho lat tie...

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1832 Creek Census – Chockolocko Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Chockolocko. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Chockolocko1Jim Fife88723 Chockolocko2Yo ho lo E marth lar1203 Chockolocko3Cho Fix i co1405 Chockolocko4Is war he2305 Chockolocko5My e per1203 Chockolocko6Tim an ol go3104 Chockolocko7Widow Wolf1203 Chockolocko8Tal las se Har jo1102 Chockolocko9John Leisco1607 Chockolocko10Sally Kogee1203 Chockolocko11Billy Fife3205 Chockolocko12Beaver3205 Chockolocko13Is far ne o boy1203 Chockolocko14Oke chum Yo ho lo4408 Chockolocko15Tus se ki ar ho lof ter3205 Chockolocko16Tus se ki ar art? Ke1304 Chockolocko17Is fa rne Yo ho lo1102 Chockolocko18Che haw Har jo3306 Chockolocko19Cle chum me Har jo3205 Chockolocko20Mol le cher1203 Chockolocko21Tus ko nar Har jo5308 Chockolocko22Ko chum nar2204 Chockolocko23Ko tock I a3306 Chockolocko24Math ho de0404 Chockolocko25Law tub ba2103 Chockolocko26Tik ko e gey2103 Chockolocko27Til lo1102 Chockolocko28Le tif Har jo2305 Chockolocko29Tom my E marth lar2103 Chockolocko30Foke a la ti ke1304...

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1832 Creek Census – Chehawah Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Chehawah. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Chehawah1John O pon nee311923 Chehawah2No cose Yo ho lo2406 Chehawah3Har pi uk Har jo2103 Chehawah4Ne har Thlock o3104 Chehawah5Kar pic char3205 Chehawah6Le tif Har jo2103 Chehawah7Ing koo tar1102 Chehawah8Oke e Tus tun nuck ee (alias Washington)3306 Chehawah9Ko cho ko nar Har jo47718 Chehawah10Kot char Har coo che2305 Chehawah11Kese Hatch Yo ho lo2406 Chehawah12Thlar hi ke3205 Chehawah13How o li chay2204 Chehawah14Nin ne o marthlar Tus tun nuck ee3205 Chehawah15Che haw Har jo2204 Chehawah16Eu po yi thle4408 Chehawah17Yar kar mitch e2406 Chehawah18Tus ko nar Har jo1102 Chehawah19Is ko you32611 Chehawah20Ful lo Har jo2204 Chehawah21Fut cher2204 Chehawah22Cho kar te Fix i co1203 Chehawah23Te wok ar le2204 Chehawah24E sar par1102 Chehawah25Tim ful kar2103 Chehawah26Tal o pe Thlock o3104 Chehawah27Sap...

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1832 Creek Census – Chehaw Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Chehaw. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Chehaw1Par hos Fix i co5106 Chehaw2No kos Har go3205 Chehaw3Spoak Oak Har go2305 Chehaw4Nos cop Fix i co5106 Chehaw5Cho gart tie Yo ho lo2103 Chehaw6Nolth bob Emarthloche2406 Chehaw7Charley4206 Chehaw9Nus cop Har go4408 Chehaw10Thlath lo Yo ho lo1102 Chehaw11Clis Sar hoie1102 Chehaw12Tus coner Har go4509 Chehaw13Con nath lar1102 Chehaw14So ful liga1102 Chehaw15Tal Loaf Har go5207 Chehaw16Ho mi ga1203 Chehaw17Sim mar la2103 Chehaw18Cock la diga2103 Chehaw19Jack1203 Chehaw20Caup hi ga3204 Chehaw21O te hia1102 Chehaw22No chi cha1102 Chehaw23Slar ho ie0303 Chehaw24Matta1102 Chehaw25E kin gar1203 Chehaw26Marth lo hie3104 Chehaw27War ga1102 Chehaw28Billy2103 Chehaw29Summer3103 Chehaw43In Thlanis Har go2103principal chief Chehaw44Salotta (alias E marth lar Yo ho lo)4206principal chief Chehaw45Fushatch Fix i co3508principal chief...

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1832 Creek Census – Chearhaw Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Chearhaw. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Chearhaw1Con chasta Micco1405 Chearhaw2Oc ti ar che Har jo4307 Chearhaw3Micco Nub bar2103 Chearhaw4Ar chu loc Har jo3407 Chearhaw5Tal le Har jo3407 Chearhaw6Star ho sie5106 Chearhaw7So fa1102 Chearhaw8Se lit ca4307 Chearhaw9Sammy4105 Chearhaw10Co e wa1203 Chearhaw11Cle Har jo3205 Chearhaw12Wox see Har jo3205 Chearhaw13Ar loc Har jo5207 Chearhaw14Ar che les lie2103 Chearhaw15Sock up po ky2103 Chearhaw16Sock hul ga2103 Chearhaw17Chu e car Har jo1102 Chearhaw18So co le ja5308 Chearhaw19Tal marse Har jo2103 Chearhaw20Hil li che3205 Chearhaw21Lo loc Kie2103 Chearhaw22Wat co Har jo1203 Chearhaw23Think in Tus ka2305 Chearhaw24Os sar ga1203 Chearhaw25To Yol Kie1102 Chearhaw26To whal lop Rie1102 Chearhaw27Te wox ho lattie1102 Chearhaw28Yoke Sar Sa1203 Chearhaw29He bilt hinne har2305 Chearhaw30Sine mat tie he che3104 Chearhaw31Sut ho ie1102 Chearhaw32Jim my1102 Chearhaw33Kin ge...

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1832 Creek Census – Chattoksofke Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Chattoksofke. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Chattoksofke1Is hat up ho gey2204 Chattoksofke2Ho bo ethe le0203 Chattoksofke3No cose Har jo2204 Chattoksofke4Chu e le2204 Chattoksofke5Ne har lock o2204 Chattoksofke6Har lot har ke1304 Chattoksofke7Wat Grayson1102 Chattoksofke8Sandy Grayson, jr.1203 Chattoksofke9Rachael Spiller1225 Chattoksofke10Walter Grayson, jr.2204 Chattoksofke11O sar Har jo2204 Chattoksofke12Pi kar1203 Chattoksofke13Nelly1304 Chattoksofke14Coch e er har1203 Chattoksofke15Fanny0404 Chattoksofke16Charles/Charley1203 Chattoksofke17San no ker2103 Chattoksofke18Cau up ho gee1102 Chattoksofke19So fick ho ni a2204 Chattoksofke20E ne he marthlar2103 Chattoksofke21Cho Fix i co2204 Chattoksofke22I yar ho me2204 Chattoksofke23Ho thle po ya1304 Chattoksofke24Kotch ar Yo ho lo2103 Chattoksofke25Fose Hatch ee Har jo1203 Chattoksofke26Ho tul ge E marth lar3203 Chattoksofke27Chock I he2103 Chattoksofke28Yar har Har jo2204 Chattoksofke29Ko lum me Har jo2103 Chattoksofke30Yo ho lo Chopko2305 Chattoksofke31I yar ho me12032nd of same name Chattoksofke32Fose...

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1832 Creek Census – Arbiccooche Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Arbiccooche. TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Arbiccooche1Cub bitche che Har jo1506 Arbiccooche2Clo cus co Micco3204 Arbiccooche3Cob biech char Micco1203 Arbiccooche4Oak fus ka Micco1102 Arbiccooche5Cha woc ca la Micco1203 Arbiccooche6O gillis Micco3104 Arbiccooche7Ne har loc co Har jo1102 Arbiccooche8Oak fus ka Har jo2204 Arbiccooche9Tul ge E marth lar3104 Arbiccooche10Coo sar Fix i co2103 Arbiccooche11Oak fus ca che Micco4105 Arbiccooche12Fo lote Har jo2305 Arbiccooche13Oak choy Har jo2204 Arbiccooche14Coo sar Har jo3306 Arbiccooche15Al lo way Har jo1102 Arbiccooche16Benne2103 Arbiccooche17Fit tal li ga1203 Arbiccooche18Con hart Emarthlo che1304 Arbiccooche19I spanny Har jo2406 Arbiccooche20Pow hos Yo ho lo2103 Arbiccooche21Tal war Har jo1304 Arbiccooche22Tal marsey2103 Arbiccooche23Coth bo boe gar??3104 Arbiccooche24Wox si Har go2305 Arbiccooche25Lif tif Har jo3104 Arbiccooche26Ko nip Har jo1203 Arbiccooche27Alla bud der4105 Arbiccooche28Cotch Yarholo2305 Arbiccooche29Yar har1304...

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