Collection: Parsons and Abbott Roll

1832 Creek Census – Cussetaw Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Cussetaw. 1832 Creek Census - Cussetaw Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Cussetaw 01 Ne har Micco 5 6 4 15 principal chief Cussetaw 02 Tus ke he ne haw Choo ley 1 1 1 3 principal chief Cussetaw 03 Ar par lar Tus tun nuck ee 3 2 0 5 principal chief Cussetaw 04 Is far ne E marth lar 3 4 0 7 principal chief Cussetaw 05 Oke fus ke Yo ho lo 2 5 0 7 principal chief Cussetaw 06 Tuck a batch ee Har jo 1 3 1 5 principal chief Cussetaw 07 E far E marth lar 2 4 11 17 principal chief Cussetaw 08 Cus se tau Micco 2 1 0 3 principal chief Cussetaw...

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1832 Creek Census – Cubihatcha Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Cubihatcha. 1832 Creek Census - Cubihatcha Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Cubihatcha 1 Peter Anderson 2 0 0 2 Cubihatcha 2 Mut teach kar 1 1 0 2 Cubihatcha 3 Sucky 1 2 0 3 Cubihatcha 4 Sam ar erkly 1 2 0 3 Cubihatcha 5 So lo di ga 2 2 0 4 Cubihatcha 6 Thomas Barefoot 4 3 0 7 Cubihatcha 7 William McGirth 3 3 2 8 Cubihatcha 8 Benjamin Walker 2 2 0 4 Cubihatcha 9 Thomas Piegeon 2 3 0 5 Cubihatcha 10 Betsy Piegeon 0 2 0 2 Cubihatcha 11 Fin ni har 1 1 0 2 Cubihatcha 12 Car bieth car 1 1 0 2 Cubihatcha 13 Joseph Pieggieon 2 3 0 5...

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1832 Creek Census – Cowyka Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Cowyka. 1832 Creek Census - Cowyka Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Cowyka 1 Yo ho lo Micco 5 2 0 7 Cowyka 2 E marth lar Tustunnuckee 1 3 0 4 Cowyka 3 E marth lo che 2 2 0 4 Cowyka 4 Chot to mic co che 3 3 0 6 Cowyka 5 Kose hatch ee Marthlar 1 3 0 4 Cowyka 6 Po fore te 1 3 0 4 Cowyka 7 Par sock e marth lar 2 2 0 4 Cowyka 8 Oke o larth le ne har 3 3 0 6 Cowyka 9 Ha li ke 1 2 0 3 Cowyka 10 Oke pis Har jo 1 1 0 2 Cowyka 11 O lar tar mee coo...

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1832 Creek Census – Coweta Towns

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Coweta. 1832 Creek Census - Coweta Towns TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Coweta 11 Kotch ar Tus tun nuck ee 1 2 0 3 principal chief Coweta 12 James Island 4 4 0 8 principal chief Coweta 13 E far Tus ke ne haw 1 2 0 3 principal chief Coweta 14 Absolom Islands 1 1 0 2 principal chief Coweta 15 Jacob Beavers 2 3 0 3 principal chief Coweta 16 Tal marse Har jo 2 2 0 4 principal chief Coweta 17 Char lo Har jo Co cho ko ne 3 2 0 5 principal chief Coweta 18 E marth lar Har jo 1 2 0 3 principal chief Coweta 19 Joseph Marshall 4 2 16 92 principal chief...

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1832 Creek Census – Corn House Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Corn House. 1832 Creek Census - Corn House Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Corn House 1 Artus Har jo 1 2 0 3 Corn House 2 Og ge de Yo ho lo 2 2 0 4 Corn House 3 No ko se Yo ho lo 1 2 0 3 Corn House 4 Ho spo tok Har jo 1 2 0 3 Corn House 5 Ti ar che Yo ho lo 1 2 0 3 Corn House 6 Nin o ne heagar 0 3 0 3 Corn House 7 Tus se ki Chop ko 3 2 0 5 Corn House 8 Ho bi e Fix i co 3 1 0 4 Corn House 9 Dick 3 1 0 4 Corn House...

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1832 Creek Census – Coosawda Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Coosawda. 1832 Creek Census - Coosawda Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Coosawda 1 Micco Hatka 3 2 0 5 Coosawda 2 Coch char Har go 1 1 0 2 Coosawda 3 No ko sic kar 1 1 0 2 Coosawda 4 Co lo che E marth lar 1 1 0 2 Coosawda 5 Ne har Fix i co 2 3 0 5 Coosawda 6 Tommy Yo ho lo 2 1 0 3 Coosawda 7 Ech hos Har go 3 3 0 6 Coosawda 8 Archi Yo ho lo 2 2 0 4 Coosawda 9 Emarthlo che 1 1 0 2 Coosawda 10 Al bud dar Har go 1 1 0 2 Coosawda 11 Toat kar to che 1 1 0...

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1832 Creek Census – Conchartetie Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Conchartetie. 1832 Creek Census - Conchartetie Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Conchartetie 1 Oak choy Fix i co 2 3 0 5 Conchartetie 2 Cil le boy E marth lar 4 1 0 5 Conchartetie 3 Ho Tul ga Fix i co 1 1 0 2 Conchartetie 4 Ko lip Har jo 2 1 0 3 Conchartetie 5 Tusta nug eigie 1 1 0 2 Conchartetie 6 O cul lote Nie? 1 1 0 2 Conchartetie 7 Tal lip Har jo 1 2 0 3 Conchartetie 8 So co li ga 1 1 0 2 Conchartetie 9 Emarth Har jo 2 2 0 4 Conchartetie 10 Tus ke ne 3 2 0 5 Conchartetie 11 Far ney Fix i co...

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1832 Creek Census – Clewalla Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Clewalla. 1832 Creek Census - Clewalla Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Clewalla 1 Micco Chopco 2 2 0 4 Clewalla 2 Micco E marth lar 4 1 0 5 Clewalla 3 Lar tar Micco 2 2 0 4 Clewalla 4 Ufawla Tustunnuggy 1 1 0 2 Clewalla 5 Talledega Tustunnuggy 2 1 0 3 Clewalla 6 Fus hatch che Micco 1 1 0 2 Clewalla 7 Micco Har go 4 2 0 6 Clewalla 8 Woc se Har go 1 4 0 5 Clewalla 9 Ho loc Ke Yo ho lo 2 2 0 4 Clewalla 10 Tallessee Hopoiethly 5 3 0 8 Clewalla 11 Toat Kis Har go 2 3 0 5 Clewalla 12 Coch che Yo ho lo...

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1832 Creek Census – Chockolocko Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Chockolocko. 1832 Creek Census - Chockolocko Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Chockolocko 1 Jim Fife 8 8 7 23 Chockolocko 2 Yo ho lo E marth lar 1 2 0 3 Chockolocko 3 Cho Fix i co 1 4 0 5 Chockolocko 4 Is war he 2 3 0 5 Chockolocko 5 My e per 1 2 0 3 Chockolocko 6 Tim an ol go 3 1 0 4 Chockolocko 7 Widow Wolf 1 2 0 3 Chockolocko 8 Tal las se Har jo 1 1 0 2 Chockolocko 9 John Leisco 1 6 0 7 Chockolocko 10 Sally Kogee 1 2 0 3 Chockolocko 11 Billy Fife 3 2 0 5 Chockolocko 12 Beaver 3 2 0 5 Chockolocko...

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1832 Creek Census – Chehawah Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Chehawah. 1832 Creek Census - Chehawah Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Chehawah 1 John O pon nee 3 1 19 23 Chehawah 2 No cose Yo ho lo 2 4 0 6 Chehawah 3 Har pi uk Har jo 2 1 0 3 Chehawah 4 Ne har Thlock o 3 1 0 4 Chehawah 5 Kar pic char 3 2 0 5 Chehawah 6 Le tif Har jo 2 1 0 3 Chehawah 7 Ing koo tar 1 1 0 2 Chehawah 8 Oke e Tus tun nuck ee (alias Washington) 3 3 0 6 Chehawah 9 Ko cho ko nar Har jo 4 7 7 18 Chehawah 10 Kot char Har coo che 2 3 0 5 Chehawah 11...

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1832 Creek Census – Chehaw Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Chehaw. 1832 Creek Census - Chehaw Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Chehaw 1 Par hos Fix i co 5 1 0 6 Chehaw 2 No kos Har go 3 2 0 5 Chehaw 3 Spoak Oak Har go 2 3 0 5 Chehaw 4 Nos cop Fix i co 5 1 0 6 Chehaw 5 Cho gart tie Yo ho lo 2 1 0 3 Chehaw 6 Nolth bob Emarthloche 2 4 0 6 Chehaw 7 Charley 4 2 0 6 Chehaw 9 Nus cop Har go 4 4 0 8 Chehaw 10 Thlath lo Yo ho lo 1 1 0 2 Chehaw 11 Clis Sar hoie 1 1 0 2 Chehaw 12 Tus coner Har go 4 5 0...

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1832 Creek Census – Chearhaw Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Chearhaw. 1832 Creek Census - Chearhaw Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Chearhaw 1 Con chasta Micco 1 4 0 5 Chearhaw 2 Oc ti ar che Har jo 4 3 0 7 Chearhaw 3 Micco Nub bar 2 1 0 3 Chearhaw 4 Ar chu loc Har jo 3 4 0 7 Chearhaw 5 Tal le Har jo 3 4 0 7 Chearhaw 6 Star ho sie 5 1 0 6 Chearhaw 7 So fa 1 1 0 2 Chearhaw 8 Se lit ca 4 3 0 7 Chearhaw 9 Sammy 4 1 0 5 Chearhaw 10 Co e wa 1 2 0 3 Chearhaw 11 Cle Har jo 3 2 0 5 Chearhaw 12 Wox see Har jo 3...

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1832 Creek Census – Chattoksofke Town

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By a treaty of March 24, 1832, the Creek Indians ceded to the United States all of their land east of the Mississippi River. Heads of families were entitled to tracts of land, which, if possible, were to include their improvements. In 1833 Benjamin S. Parsons and Thomas J. Abbott prepared a census of Creek Indian heads of families, which gave their names and the number of males, females, and slaves in each family. The entries were arranged by town and numbered; these numbers were used for identification in later records. This is the census for the town of Chattoksofke. 1832 Creek Census - Chattoksofke Town TownNumberHeadMalesFemalesSlavesTotalRemarks Chattoksofke 1 Is hat up ho gey 2 2 0 4 Chattoksofke 2 Ho bo ethe le 0 2 0 3 Chattoksofke 3 No cose Har jo 2 2 0 4 Chattoksofke 4 Chu e le 2 2 0 4 Chattoksofke 5 Ne har lock o 2 2 0 4 Chattoksofke 6 Har lot har ke 1 3 0 4 Chattoksofke 7 Wat Grayson 1 1 0 2 Chattoksofke 8 Sandy Grayson, jr. 1 2 0 3 Chattoksofke 9 Rachael Spiller 1 2 2 5 Chattoksofke 10 Walter Grayson, jr. 2 2 0 4 Chattoksofke 11 O sar Har jo 2 2 0 4 Chattoksofke 12 Pi kar 1...

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