Select Page

Collection: Town History of Fryeburg Maine

Bridges, Canal, Post Offices of Fryeburg, Maine

Dea. Richard Eastman operated a ferry for many years near the point where the toll bridge was erected in 1870; this bridge is 76 feet long, being the shortest of the seven bridges which span the Saco and Canal. The first bridge built was at Swan’s Falls about 1780. The oldest now in use is Weston’s bridge, 250 feet long, built in 1844, according to Wm. Gordon. Canal bridge 272 feet long, was built in 1846; Walker’s bridge 164 feet, in 1848; Charles river bridge (a tributary) 87 feet, in 1856; Island bridge, 110 feet, in 1862; Hemlock bridge 116, in 1867; the Toll bridge (now free), in 1870; and the new iron bridge at the Harbor 80 feet, built in 1894. All except the latter are covered. The canal was begun in 1812, when a narrow channel was cut. The freshet of 1820 greatly widened the channel, reduced the length of the Saco in town from 36 miles to 24 miles, and draining an extensive area of valuable arable land. Fryeburg post office was established Jan. 1, 1798, with Moses Ames, postmaster. The post office at the Center was established Feb. 19, 1833, Henry G. Farrington, P. M. West Fryeburg post office was established in July 1887, Mrs. E. P. Hutchins,...

Read More

West Oxford Agricultural Association

The WEST OXFORD AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION AND FAIR was organized and established in 1851. For over half a century this has been an important factor in the life and social and commercial developement of a wide...

Read More

Act of Incorporation – Organization of Fryeburg, Maine

In the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy six. An Act for erecting a Tract of Land Coold Fryeburg of two thousand one hundred and seventy two Rods square Lying in the County of York, which was granted as a Township to Joseph Frye, Esq., Anno Domoni seventeen hundred sixty-two and Confirmed Anno Domoni seventeen hundred sixty-three into a town by the name of Fryeburg. Whereas the Inhabitance of that tract of Land Consisting of Proprietors & non Proprietors Promiscuously settled thereon Having lately been united in ordaining a Minister of the Gospel among them, are Desirous of a unity in the Expense of his Support of Building a Meeting House and other Public Charges of the place, but Cannot Lay a Tax upon themselves for those Purposes till said Tract of Land is incorporated into a Town. Therefore be it enacted by the Council and House of Representatives in General Court Assembled and by the Authority of the same that the aforesaid Tract of Land originally Bounded as Followeth viz: at the South Corner to a Spruce Tree marked thence running (?) North forty-five Degrees west, (by the needal) two thousand one hundred and seventy-two Rods to a Beach Tree marked thence North forty-five Degrees East, two thousand one hundred and seventy-two Rods to a Maple Tree marked thence south forty-five Degrees East, two...

Read More

The Maine Indians

Before the encroachment of pale faced settlers, the entire valley of the Saco and its tributaries was peopled by the numerous Sokokis Indians. These were considered the parent tribe of the Abenaki Nation, which at one time peopled the whole of Maine. One of the most eloquent and statesmanlike of their chiefs once said in council, “We received our lands from the Great Father of Life; we hold only from Him.” Their title was unquestionable and unmolested, they roamed the valley from their village at the Lower Falls (Saco) to the settlement on the great bend, on the intervales of Fryeburg. These were in many respects a noble race of red men, evincing unmistakable evidence of having descended from a higher state, and still retained a fine sense of honor and personal dignity. The Sokokis tribe 1Saco Valley Settlements and Families. was once so numerous that they could call nine hundred warriors to arms, but war and pestilence reduced their number to a, mere handful.1 The residence of the sagamores was on Indian Island, above the lower falls. Among the names of the chiefs who dwelt hereabout were those of Capt. Sunday, the two Heagons, and Squando who succeeded Fluellen. For some years these Indians lived with the white settlers in peace and quietness, some of them acquiring a fair knowledge of the English language by their intercourse. When...

Read More

The Pequawket Expedition

On April 16, the company bade farewell to their friends and kindred in Dunstable, Mass., the home of many of the party, and proceeded to Contoocook, and to the west shore of Ossipee Lake. Here they halted and erected a fort which should serve as a rallying point and base of supplies. By this time two men had become disabled. One had returned home accompanied by a friend, Benj. Kidder was left at the fort, with the surgeon and a guard of eight. The remaining thirty-four men took up the trail to Pequawket with good courage. On Tuesday, two days before the battle, the party were suspicious that they had been discovered by the enemy, and on Friday night the guard heard them creeping through the underbrush about their encampment. At an early hour Saturday morning, May 8th, while they were yet at their devotions, the report of a gun was heard, and soon an Indian was seen standing upon a point of land extending into Saco (now Lovewell’s) pond. They supposed this was a decoy, to draw them into ambush. A conference was immediately held to determine what course to pursue. The men were anxious for an engagement, but Capt. Lovewell seems to have assented against his wishes. They prepared for action. Assuming that the foe was still in front he ordered the men to lay down their...

Read More

Town History of Fryeburg, Maine

Nestled close to the New Hampshire border is the small community of Fryeburg, Maine. Our newest online free manuscript provides you a look into the history of this community. Included with this manuscript is information on the Sokokis Indians, and a brief military history of Fryeburg.

Read More

1907 Fryeburg Maine Census

The population of the towns of Fryeburg, Lovell, Sweden Stow and Chatham has been arranged in families, where that arrangement has been possible. In these families, in addition to the resident living members, the names of the nonresident members are included. It should be borne in mind that this plan does not include the names of all former residents of this town, as the names of the non-residents appear only when one or both of the parents are still living in the town. After the name of each non-resident will be found the present address, when such address has...

Read More
  • 1
  • 2

Search


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Pin It on Pinterest